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Pressure ulcers

allied health
by

Noelle Hong

on 30 September 2013

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Transcript of Pressure ulcers

Definition
A pressure ulcer is an area of skin that breaks down when something keeps rubbing or pressing against the skin.
Etiology
Prognosis
Signs and Symptoms
Prevention
Make sure the patient is moved constantly to relieve pressure
Use items that help reduce pressure
Eat well-balanced meals that contain a good amount of calories
Drink eight to ten cups of water each day
Keep the skin clean and dry
Exercise daily
Treatment
After the necrosis, the dead tissue must be removed. The main goal is to promote blood flow to the area. Some doctors use leech therapy, possibly in combination with maggot therapy.

Pressure ulcers
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Pressure ulcers are simply caused by necrosis because of occluded blood. These injuries generally happen over a long course of time.
Younger people have a better outcome because of their ability to recuperate and their better immune system. Patients also have a better prognosis if the pressure ulcer is caught in an early stage.
Patients who are more prone to pressure ulcers are those that:
are bedridden or use a wheelchair
cannot use certain parts of the body
have a disease that affects blood flow
have a condition that affect mental status
have bowel/urinary incontinence
have fragile skin
are malnourished



Stage I: A reddened area on the skin that, when pressed, does not turn white.
Stage II: The skin blisters or forms an open sore. The area around the sore may be red and irritated.
Stage III: The skin now develops an open, sunken hole called a crater. There is damage to the tissue below the skin.
Stage IV: The pressure ulcer has become so deep that there is damage to the muscle and bone, and sometimes to tendons and joints.

Pressure sores are unstageable when the tissue at the base of the ulcer is covered by dead skin that is yellow, tan, green, or brown.
Pressure sores categorized as deep tissue injury may be purple or maroon. This may be an area of skin or blood-filled blister due to damage of soft tissue from pressure. The area around may be sore, firm, mushy, boggy, warmer, or cooler compared with tissue nearby.
The beginning symptoms of pressure ulcers is red skin that gets worse over time or an area that forms a blister, then an open sore.
Basic wound care involves keeping bandages clean and rotating times of exposure.
Other care includes:
Relieving pressure on that area by means of pillows or other soft material
Lightly powdering sheets (decreases friction)
Eating healthy foods
Cleaning the ulcer (generally, pressure ulcers are rinsed with a salt-water to remove loose, dead tissue; the sore is then covered with special gauze dressing made for pressure ulcers)
Typically, the doctor will prescribe a medicine.
If caught in a later stage, it depends on the age and health factors of the patient.
Simple steps can be taken to prevent pressure ulcers:
STAGE I
STAGE II
STAGE III
Credentials
STAGE IV
Full transcript