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John Spargo and Child Labor

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on 26 November 2013

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Transcript of John Spargo and Child Labor

Child Labor and The People Who Tried To Stop It
John Spargo
John Spargo was a social reformer and author, born in Cornwall England in 1876.
Child Labor
Child labor has been around throughout history. However, it reached new heights during the industrial revolution, and did not shrink back down until just one hundred years ago.
Bibliography
http://www2.webster.edu/~woolfm/gabbott.html
GRACE ABBOTT
Grace Abbott was a teacher, social reformer, and writer.
Her sister, Edith Abbott was also a social reformer, and they were both inspired by their mother's avid belief in equal rights.

She worked and lived at the Hull House for nine years from 1908 until 1917.

She also wrote a book called
The Immigrant and His Community.

In 1917 she also became a director of the Industrial Division of the Children's Bureau, a federal agency that protected children from abuse, and gave the children back their birth right. As the director she was responsible for making enforcement plans for the first child labor law passed by Congress in 1916.
What did Grace Abbott do about Child Labor?
For many years Grace Abbott worked to stop and prevent child labor.
Grace Abbott often made appearances on TV or radio, and talked about the best methods of childcare and the state's responsibility to child welfare.
Interesting Facts About Abbott
What would have been her 135th birthday was on Nov. 17th
She passed away on June 19th 19 1939 at the age of 61.
There is a children's park named after her in Grand Island.
She served on President FDR's council from 1934 until she died.
From 1922-1934 Grace Abbott was the official representative for the U.S. on the League of Nations' Advisory on children welfare.
She was also the President of the National Conference of Social Work in Paris.
She participated in the first social work ever held.
He served in the Socialist Party until 1917 because of the antiwar policy.
In 1917 after leaving the Socialist Party, John Spargo and Samuel Gompers, a labor and union leader, created the American Alliance for Labor and Democracy.
John Spargo also organized a settlement house in Yonkers, New York.
John Spargo's Many Books
John Spargo wrote many books some of his most famous one's include:
The Bitter Cry of Children (1906)
A Biography Of Karl Max (1910)
Applied Socialism (1912)
The Psychology of Bolshevism (1919)
Pictures of John Spargo
Pictures of Grace Abbott
Interesting Facts About Abbott
What would have been her 135th birthday passed on November 17th.
Grace Abbott participated in the first ever social work meeting.
She participated on President Franklin D. Roosevelt's council.
There is a park in Grand Island named after her.
www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/history-child-labor
www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/people/spargo-john.html
www.google.com/images
www.history.com/topics/children-labor
There were many children who worked for 70 hours or more just to earn a dollar. This money that they earned went towards giving food for themselves or their family.
The 5 W's
Who?
Children from ages 5-16 or so were "drafted" into work. By the Industrial Revolution there were about 2,000,000 school children working.
What?
These young children were forced to work at several different locations for up to about 70 hours a week, for a little amount of money that went towards food, clothing, and other needs.
When?
Child labor has been around for most of history, but it accelerated in the 1700 to late 1800s. Children were often forced to work for six days a week,
The 5 W's
Where?
Children were forced to work at many locations such as farms, mills, or in factories.
Why?
Some (and most) children were forced to work at the factories or farms etc. But a few amount went to work to earn money for their families and themselves.
Pictures of The Children Forced To Work
Child Labor Today
Child Labor is still, sadly a very real thing. It occurs in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean.
www.dol.gov/ILAB/programs/iclp/faqs_iclp.htm
Thank You For Watching
Full transcript