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Copy of Jekyll and Hyde

KS3 Prose Study
by

Matthew Bell

on 27 August 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Jekyll and Hyde

In Literature
What do we know?
Transformations
Know some historical background of Jekyll and Hyde.
Know about the basic story and plot.

Many people who have never read the novel you are about to read would use this phrase:
“...a bit of a Jekyll and Hyde”
as shorthand for something else. What do you think it might mean?

You might be able to think of characters in books, films or TV programmes who fit this description.

What is special about this picture?
Characters who transform themselves or who are changed against their will into a different outward form are a staple ingredient in many myths, legends and fairy tales. See how many more examples you can add to this table:

Why was the idea of transformation particularly important to people at the time the novella was written?

1.The Making of a Legend
En2 AF7 - Historical, social and cultural traditions
Activity
Mind-map everything you know about Jekyll and Hyde
Read the factsheet From Page, To Stage, To Screen and write down five facts that you did not know before.
Shortly after Jekyll and Hyde was published, there were a string of five gruesome murders in an area of London known as Whitechapel.

Do you know the murderer? Read the article for all the gory details!

From
To
Leda and the Swan
Prince
Zeus
Swan
Frog
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
Changes...
The Frog Prince
What genre is each story?
Why do so many stories make use of transformations?

Is it possible to classify them into sub-categories? For example:
Those which enable characters to escape
Those which give characters a greater power.

Are there other genres you enjoy reading where transformations occur?
When do they take place and why?

Reflect on what you have learnt
In Literature
What do we know?
Transformations
Know some historical background of Jekyll and Hyde.
Know about the basic story and plot.

Many people who have never read the novel you are about to read would use this phrase:
“...a bit of a Jekyll and Hyde”
as shorthand for something else. What do you think it might mean?

You might be able to think of characters in books, films or TV programmes who fit this description.

What is special about this picture?
Characters who transform themselves or who are changed against their will into a different outward form are a staple ingredient in many myths, legends and fairy tales. See how many more examples you can add to this table:

Why was the idea of transformation particularly important to people at the time the novella was written?

2.
En2 AF7 - Historical, social and cultural traditions
Activity
Read the factsheet From Page, To Stage, To Screen and write down five facts that you did not know before.
Shortly after Jekyll and Hyde was published, there were a string of five gruesome murders in an area of London known as Whitechapel.

Do you know the murderer? Read the article for all the gory details!

From
To
Leda and the Swan
Prince
Zeus
Swan
Frog
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
Changes...
The Frog Prince
What genre is each story?
Why do so many stories make use of transformations?

Is it possible to classify them into sub-categories? For example:
Those which enable characters to escape
Those which give characters a greater power.

Are there other genres you enjoy reading where transformations occur?
When do they take place and why?

Question what we have learnt
In Literature
What do we know?
Transformations
Know some historical background of Jekyll and Hyde.
Know about the basic story and plot.

Many people who have never read the novel you are about to read would use this phrase:
“...a bit of a Jekyll and Hyde”
as shorthand for something else. What do you think it might mean?

You might be able to think of characters in books, films or TV programmes who fit this description.

What is special about this picture?
Characters who transform themselves or who are changed against their will into a different outward form are a staple ingredient in many myths, legends and fairy tales. See how many more examples you can add to this table:

Why was the idea of transformation particularly important to people at the time the novella was written?

1.The Making of a Legend
En2 AF7 - Historical, social and cultural traditions
Activity
Read the factsheet From Page, To Stage, To Screen and write down five facts that you did not know before.
Shortly after Jekyll and Hyde was published, there were a string of five gruesome murders in an area of London known as Whitechapel.

Do you know the murderer? Read the article for all the gory details!

From
To
Leda and the Swan
Prince
Zeus
Swan
Frog
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
Changes...
The Frog Prince
What genre is each story?
Why do so many stories make use of transformations?

Is it possible to classify them into sub-categories? For example:
Those which enable characters to escape
Those which give characters a greater power.

Are there other genres you enjoy reading where transformations occur?
When do they take place and why?

Question what we have learnt
Is it a gothic novel?
Interpretations of the Title
Important Terminology
Read chapter 3.
Learn some important terminology.
Consider the character of Jekyll.

What does the title of the chapter suggest to you?

Think about how the other characters are feeling.


What do you know about the character of Jekyll?

5. Dr Jekyll was Quite at Ease
AF5 - explain and comment on writers' use of
language, including grammatical and literary
features at word and sentence level
Dr Jekyll was quite at ease
Read chapter 3.

We need to keep track of events so we don’t get confused.
What has happened?
Who was involved?
Who witnessed these events
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
What does each term mean?

Metamorphosis
Antithesis
Protagonist
Antagonist
Obfuscation
Supernatural
Melancholy


Check what you have learnt:
1
2
In Literature
What do we know?
Transformations
Know some historical background of Jekyll and Hyde.
Know about the basic story and plot.

Many people who have never read the novel you are about to read would use this phrase:
“...a bit of a Jekyll and Hyde”
as shorthand for something else. What do you think it might mean?

You might be able to think of characters in books, films or TV programmes who fit this description.

What is special about this picture?
Characters who transform themselves or who are changed against their will into a different outward form are a staple ingredient in many myths, legends and fairy tales. See how many more examples you can add to this table:

Why was the idea of transformation particularly important to people at the time the novella was written?

2.
En2 AF7 - Historical, social and cultural traditions
Activity
Read the factsheet From Page, To Stage, To Screen and write down five facts that you did not know before.
Shortly after Jekyll and Hyde was published, there were a string of five gruesome murders in an area of London known as Whitechapel.

Do you know the murderer? Read the article for all the gory details!

From
To
Leda and the Swan
Prince
Zeus
Swan
Frog
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
Changes...
The Frog Prince
What genre is each story?
Why do so many stories make use of transformations?

Is it possible to classify them into sub-categories? For example:
Those which enable characters to escape
Those which give characters a greater power.

Are there other genres you enjoy reading where transformations occur?
When do they take place and why?

Question what we have learnt
Mr Utterson – A Profile
Archaic Language
Find a way into the story by analysing the opening paragraphs.
Develop first impressions of Mr Utterson.


What is archaic language?


Use the table to help sort out your first impressions of Mr Utterson’s character. Jot down words and phrases from the description.




2. Meet Gabriel Utterson
AF3 - deduce, infer or interpret information, events or ideas from texts
Activity
Positive
Negative
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
First Impressions...
Draw and label an image of the character
Discuss with a partner any questions left in your mind after you have read the description.

What else would you like to know?
Is anything odd?

Choose one key question that you think might be answered by the rest of the book and write it down.


Reflect on what you have read
Why might people find the opening of the story difficult to read?

Look at the words on the cards. Match the archaic word to its modern counterpart.

Many modern readers have picked up this book, just as you are about to do, with high expectations of a famous horror story – and then found it surprisingly hard to get into the opening chapter. The first two paragraphs could hardly be slower or more complicated! You might be able to think of films where you spent the first five or ten minutes not quite knowing what was going on. We seem to cope better with this when watching films rather than reading.
Why might this be?

Read the extract on your own first. See if you can understand the gist of the story.

Then listen to your teacher read it.

What can you understand about what is written?

Chapter 1 Extracts
In 1886, Stevenson’s Victorian readers, with no cinema or television to tell them stories, and a more leisurely pace of life than ours, were more patient with prose than we are. They would have settled down quite comfortably to this long and detailed description of Mr Utterson, whereas we are more likely to ask, ‘Why do I need to know all this?’. Most film versions will miss out completely the character of the lawyer, but when you have read the whole novel you will understand why he is there.

3
Reading Detective
Door Description
Story of the Door
Look at visualising elements of the story.
Consider the genre of the story.
Start character dossiers.


Listen to a description of a door and house.

Draw a quick image of this.

Is it the sort of place that you would go near or choose to avoid?


Chapter 1

We need to keep track of events so we don’t get confused.
What has happened?
Who was involved?
Who witnessed these events?

When reading a book you become, in some ways, like a detective.

Think about what readers and detectives have in common.
What elements are there to suggest that ‘Jekyll and Hyde’ is a detective story?


3. Story of the Door
En2 AF7 - Historical, social and cultural traditions
Description
It was a beautiful tree-lined avenue that seemed to sparkle in the warm autumn light. The elegant homes stood tall and proud alongside eachother like collection of valuable antique books. The street narrowed towards the end and there, tucked in the corner was another type of house completely. This house was set back off the street with a disused look to it. The front garden was filled with litter and an old trolley lay on one side across the path. The house sneered at the weedy garden and the cracked windows showed the remains of eggs where children had bombed the property. Old, moth-eaten curtains hung lifelesslybeyond the glass, allowing glimpses of the rotting rooms beyond. A stray cat slinked over the doorstep and disappeared through th gap left by the door that now hung on just one rusted hinge. Darkness beckoned from within.
Detective
Reader
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
How many other similarities?
What is a metaphor? How could the door be seen as a metaphor? What could it represent?

What is personification? How can a house be personified? Think of three different examples.

How does Stevenson structure the story to show the importance of different characters?

Reflect on and extend your learning
For each chapter you will need to keep track of events but also ask some questions.

For this chapter you might ask:
Who wrote the cheque?
Why did Utterson and Enfield decide never to mention this again?

Genre


First of all, what is
How many types of genre can you name?
What would you expect to see from (what are the conventions of)...


DETECTIVE HORROR

Most people would classify Jekyll and Hyde as a horror story but it also has elements of the detective story (Mr Utterson is a perfect detective figure). Even the chapter names are mysterious:
Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
Story of the door
Search for Mr Hyde
Incident of the letter
Remarkable incident of Dr Lanyon
They would sound normal with ‘The’ in front of them. Without it they sound like notes – unconnected information that doesn’t make sense yet.

Meets people for
the first time.

Introduced to
new characters.

Begins knowing
very little.

Doesn’t know much
(if anything) about the
plot at the start of the
story.

Narrative
Perspective
'Detective'
Lawyer
Hyde
Utterson
Scientist
Split-personality
Respected
Jekyll
Lanyon
This is a complicated story. There are lots of connections between characters. We will make a file on each character, like a detective’s dossier in a crime investigation.

You will meet four main characters:
Utterson, Jekyll, Hyde and Lanyon.

(Are you surprised that Mr Enfield is not included? How did Stevenson indicate that you need to concentrate more on Utterson than on his cousin?)

In your dossier on each character you should find information on each of these headings. Use direct evidence (quotes with page numbers) where possible.

AGE
ADDRESS
APPEARANCE
OCCUPATION
HABITS
CHARACTERISTICS
FRIENDS AND CONTACTS
ANYTHING THAT PUZZLES YOU
OTHER

Connections
‘If he be Mr Hyde, I shall be Mr Seek’
Read Chapter 2
Read chapter 2.
Consider the relationship between Hyde, Jekyll and Utterson.


In the second chapter Utterson finds it hard to stick to the agreement he reached with Enfield at the end of Chapter 1 (to try and forget about Hyde’s crime and the events that followed).



Read chapter 2.

We need to keep track of events so we don’t get confused.
What has happened?
Who was involved?
Who witnessed these events?

How many links can you find between the characters so far?

Has your view or Utterson changed since chapter 1? How and why?


4. Search for Mr Hyde
En2 AF2 - understand, describe, select or
retrieve information, events or ideas
from texts and use quotation and
reference to text
Look again at the following extracts from chapter 1.
...The next thing was to get the money; and where do you think he carried us but to that place with the door? whipped out a key, went in, and presently came back with the matter of ten pounds in gold and a cheque for the balance on Coutt’s, drawn payable to bearer, and signed with a name that I can’t mention, though it’s one of the points of my story, but it was a name at least very well known and often printed. The figure was stiff; but the signature was good for more than that, if it was only genuine. I took the liberty of pointing out to my gentleman that the whole business looked apocryphal (deeply mysterious); and that a man does not, in real life, walk into a cellar door at four in the morning and come out of it with another man’s cheque for close upon a hundred pounds.
(To understand how shocked Enfield is by how easily Hyde obtains the money, you need to bear in mind that this sum of money in 1886 would be roughly what a factory worker would earn in a year!)
.
Although it is called ‘Search for Mr Hyde’, most readers will be impatient to meet Dr Jekyll (the one person who might have some answers).

Mini Essay: How does Stevenson use language to keep the reader in suspense in Chapter 2?


Reflect on what you have learnt and apply the knowledge
Next, notice Utterson’s slightly surprising reaction...

You are sure he used a key? ...I know it must seem strange. The fact is, if I do not ask you the name of the other party, it is because I know it already.

At the very start of the book, Utterson seemed to have nothing to do with Jekyll or Hyde. Chapter 2 is important because it reveals some threads that connect him to both of them.

Hyde
Utterson
Jekyll
Look at the extract describing Jekyll’s will.

Why might Utterson have been so unhappy about this will?

Utterson is becoming a part of the Jekyll and Hyde plot, rather than a mere observer.

Point
State the point clearly, bluntly and briefl

Evidence
Put a fact (or facts) to prove what you are saying

Explanation
Then explain how what you are saying answers the question you have been asked.

You get extra credit if you can:
offer a number of ideas,
give an assessment of how important this point is,
link this point to other paragraphs.
Show close textual analysis

NOTE, it is this bit of the paragraph that gets you your marks.


PEE
Add any new information and details to your character dossiers.

Do you have any questions about Jekyll now that you have met the character?

Metamorphosis – an animal modifying or changing, like Jekyll into Hyde. (This is like an evolutionary change – link to Darwin).
Antithesis – Complete opposite
Protagonist – Main character (good guy)
Antagonist – Bad guy (fights the main guy)
Obfuscation – Like ‘mist’ reflects cloudy judgement
Supernatural – beyond normal (human?)
Melancholy – depression

We may not have yet seen examples of each of the important terms shown. However, some of them we can find examples of.

The protagonist could be...
The antagonist could be...

See if you can find quotes that demonstrate:
Obfuscation
Melancholy
Supernatural.

Use these images to work out tropes and motifs of the gothic genre (things you expect to see):

Castles or unusual buildings (odd, creepy, dark windows, alleys)
Moon, night, use of weather
Darkness
Death
Church and religious references (sin, good vs. Evil, Hyde as the devil)

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Full transcript