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Representative Democracy Timeline

A timeline of representative democracy in the UK
by

Mike Britland

on 11 September 2014

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Transcript of Representative Democracy Timeline

Representative Democracy
1649-53
1688
1689
1832
1830s-1900
1884
1928
1945
2010
After the death of Charles I a number of attempts were made to
govern
by means of Parliament.
However, system was
not democratic
and the new
representative institution lacked legitimacy
Glorious Revolution, King James II was replaced by William III & his wife Mary
Bill of Rights
was agreed between the new
monarchy
&
Parliament
Effectively
transferred sovereignty
to Parliament (all laws required their approval)
However, both the
commons
and the
Lords
continued to
lack democratic legitimacy
John Locke

published
Two Treatises of Government
Highly influential

work set out the
principles of representative democracy operating within a limited monarchy
The Great Reform Act
introduced a fairer, regular system for the
election of MPs
Widened the franchise to inc.
property-owning middle classes
(still small proportion of the total population
Made the
House of Commons legitimate
& can be treated as the
dawn of parliamentary democracy
as we understand it today
Party System
developed over this period
The Conservative Party
evolved under Robert Peel (1788-1850),
Liberals
under William Gladstone (1809-1898),
Labour
founded in 1900.
Increasingly,
voting was based
on the
party affiliation of a candidate
rather than on his personal philosophy & qualities
Party representation
evolved
The Third Reform Act
granted voting rights to
most of the male
population
House of Commons could
claim even more legitimacy
and thus gained
superiority
over the unelected House of Lords
The
principle of universal suffrage
was finally established
Virtually
all adults, men and women
, over the age of
21
were granted the franchise
Britain could now be said to be a
true liberal democracy
First
truly modern election
manifesto
appeared, published by the
Labour Party
Labour elected with
clear programme of reform
, approved by the
electorate
Manifesto set out the Party's
policies
, implied that the
new government had a mandate
to carry out the policies contained in the manifesto
Introduced
the
representative concept of mandate & manifesto
Since 1945 manifestos have become
more detailed
& mandate become clearer
First coalition
government since 1945 ushered in a
new kind of representation
Such a government has
no clear mandate
but, instead has
developed policies
that represent a

consensus of support
These
policies
can be found on
page 111
in the text book
Full transcript