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Change Blindness between Males and Females

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dekeysha cooper

on 5 December 2014

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Transcript of Change Blindness between Males and Females

Gender Differences in Perception of Change
Presented By Adrianna , Carney, Dekeysha, Grace, Heather
Washburn University

Introduction
Hypothesis:
Women are more likely to notice and speak up about noticing drastic changes (Change Blindness)
Method
Results
1 woman spoke up out of 8
0 men spoke up out of 8
1 person spoke up out of 16 people
Discussion

Yes
No
Male
Female
0
8
1
Questions
Now would be the time for questions
Adrianna grabbed the subject's attention
Dekeysha stole the subject's attention
Adrianna and Carney switched
Dekeysha finished and left
Subjects returned to Carney to fill out survey
kept track of which subjects noticed the change
Location
In front of the Corner Store in Memorial Union
References
Fallon, M. Reis, V. Waite, B. (2014) Own-Gender Bias in Change Detection for Gender Specific Images. Journal of Psychological Research. Vol. 19 No. 2 71-76. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
Kadsosh, H. (2007). Effect of isolated facial feature transformations in a change blindness experiment involving a person as the object of change (Unpublished masters thesis). University of the Witwatersrand. November 25, 2014.
(2002). Is 'Change Blindness' Attenuated by Domain-specific Expertise? An Expert-Novices Comparison of Change Detection in Football Images. Visual Cognition: Vol. 7, No. 1-3, pp.163-173. doi10.1080/135062800394748 Retrieved November 25, 2014.
(Banaji, M. Greenwald, A.) Implicit Gender Stereotyping in Judgements of Fame. Journal of Personality and Social Pyschology, 1995. Vol. 68, No. 2 181-198. November 26, 2014.
Dretske, F. (2004). Change Blindness. Philosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition, 120(1/3, Proceedings of the Thirty-Fifth Oberlin Colloquium in Philosophy: Philosophy of Perception), 1-18. Retrieved December 02, 2014, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/4321506?ref=no-x-route:ff03902b3899b773701e1bc9e5181632
**Note**
Yielded no data after 1 hour of waiting
Method
Adrianna, Dekeysha, and Adrianna sister sat behind desk
Person walked up, caught attention from desk
Heather interrupted with survey
Person returns to desk and Adrianna's sister replaced Dekeysha/Adrianna
Location
Carnegie Library
Time
Approx. 1 hour
7
**Note**
All results from Corner Store
Results
Hypothesis=Supported
What is Change Blindness?
39% of women noticed changes in photographs of people compared to only 25% of men (2)
On a scale of 1-5, women achieved a 3.5 while men received a 3 with female-oriented changes within photographs (1)
If a person knows about change blindness or the person they will notice the change more likely (3)
Women are more likely to notice change in women (1)
Women noticed change more in photographs than men (2)
People
Materials
surveys
positivity notes
experimenters
Full transcript