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A Conceptual History Of Computing

The basic concepts behind modern computers and the history of their development
by

Mike Caprio

on 14 November 2014

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Transcript of A Conceptual History Of Computing

What Do You
Know About
Computers?

OS
Thinking Like A Programmer
CPU
hardware
shell
Hard Drive
The Unit Of Information: Binary Digits (a.k.a. bits)
Modern Digital Computers
Analog to Digital - Everything is Numbers
Early Devices For Computing
Analog
Computers
The Church-Turing
Thesis
Alan Turing's Enigma
"Every effectively calculable function is a computable function."

In other words, if it can be calculated, it can be done by a computer.
Digital
Computers

Binary: 0 or 1 [base 2]
Decimal: 0, 1, 2, 3... 9 [base 10]
Hexadecimal: 0, 1, 2... 9, A, B, C, D, E, F [base 16]
Two Hex digits can be a byte
0011 1111
3 F
63
DEC BIN
O O
1 1
2 10
3 11
4 100
5 101
6 110
7 111
ANYTHING Can Be Represented As A Number
A byte is 8 bits - a Kilobyte is 1024 bytes (2^10)
CPU
Memory
MegaBytes MB (1024 x 1024)
GigaBytes GB
TeraBytes TB
PetaBytes PB
Hertz - "cycles per second" GigaHertz (GHz)
The "working area" that's "near" the processor
where data moves back and forth quickly
(also measured in Bytes)
You Don't Have To Be Harry Potter To
Be A Programmer
hypertext
computer networks
graphical user interface
$$
No.
Hard drive
Memory
Graphics card
USB
CD/DVD
kernel
System Software
Drivers
Applications
word processor
spreadsheet
web
browser
Utilities
Full transcript