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proposal writing

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by

Amr Tarek

on 20 July 2013

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Transcript of proposal writing

By:
Amr Tarek

Writing A Good Proposal
Energizer
Main Parts of a Proposal
Title Page
Project Overview
Available Resources
What is a proposal ?
Support
financial
Human Resources
Equipment
Technical support
Why do we write proposals ?
Facts to Keep in Mind Before Writing a Proposal
•Your proposal is often read by one or two experts in your field. However, the program manager, and perhaps other reviewers are not experts.
Fact 1: Reviewers
Fact 2: Busy Managers
Fact 3: First Page-First Impression
Common Mistakes in writing a proposal
•What you want to do?
•Whether the idea is new?
•why it is important?
•Why you should succeed?
•How much it will cost?
In your introduction you have to address the following:
•The proposal is vague in key areas:
–The question addressed by the proposal
–The outcome of the project
–The measure of success or failure

–Clearly state all of your ideas
–Describe your preliminary work that shows evidence that the idea is good.
"give us the money and we will figure out how to do the work”
The proposal is written in such a way that gives the impression of:
The proposal is comprehensible to only expert in the field.
Some of the evaluators are not experts in all areas of the proposal.
–A good proposal should be comprehensible to non-experts, while also convincing experts that you know your subject.
–Avoid highly technical material in the introduction.
The proposal is too expensive for the probable gain.
Expensive proposals are more likely to be rejected.
1.TITLE
2.PROJECT OVERVIEW
3.BACKGROUND INFORMATION/STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
4.PROJECT DETAILs:
Goals & Objectives
Clientele
Methods
Staff/Administration
5.AVAILABLE RESOURCES/NEEDED RESOURCES:
Personnel
Facilities
Equipment/Supplies/Communication
Budget
6.EVALUATION PLAN
7.APPENDICES
Funding agencies often have specifications for the Title Page
Your cover page should look professional and neat.
The title should gives a quick image of the key ideas of your proposal

–Remove words that are not necessary for understanding the merit of the proposal.
–Major word in the title should be in capital letters.
–Try and use only a single sentence for your title.
Example:
1 –Observing the Ocean Actions by Local Initiative to Create a Cable-based Underwater Power System.
2 -Power System for Ocean Observatories
Analysis:•
-Title 1 is too complex with unnecessary clauses
-Title 2 is as informative... Perfect for a title.
Projects Details
Background Information/Statement of the Problem
The Project Overview should be an Executive Summary of the ideas.
- Executives are busy and they often have enough time to read just the overview
•The Project Overview should be specific and concise.
-Details should be clarified at a later point in your proposal.
•The Project Overview should show your knowledge of the funding agency.
The Project Overview should be written after you have completed the entire proposal.
- It is a review of relevant previous work
• Show how your project:
– extends the previous work
– avoids the mistakes of earlier work
-You should address the following questions:
-What are the pressing problems that you want to
address?
–How do you know these problems are important?
• Check to see that the potential funding agency is committed to the same problems that your proposal is addressing.

Show any special reason that your organization is uniquely suited to conduct the project.
Geographic location, expertise, prior involvements in this area, close relationship to the project clientele, etc.
- Be careful in your use of language. Minimizes the use of:
– Jargons ex. ( medical, political registers..... etc)
– Acronyms ex. (U.S.A, uk, OPEC.....etc)
– Redundant phrase
– Colloquial expressions
A- Goals and Objectives
B- Clientele
C- Methods
• There should be a very clear link between the methods
you describe in this section and the objectives you have
previously defined.
The funding agency will examine your methods looking for:
– what is new in your proposal?
– what is unique or innovative?
– the importance of the proposed method to the solution
- Clearly indicate how the methods allow the outcomes.
D- Staff/Administration
A steering committee
A viable Steering Committee can suggest to a funding agency that :
-The project has strong links to the community
-The project has a good chance of continuing after the funding period is over.
Resources
Needed Resources
- Consider describing existing facilities as in-kind contributions to the project.
–free access to classrooms
–meeting space at a libraries
–project room in a local office building
A-personnel
B-Facilities
C- Equipment / supplies
D-Budget
- Make your budget realistic.
- Check with the agency to see if they have suggested/required budget categories that they want you to use
Evaluation Plan
- Try to Include
Formative
evaluation and
Summative
evaluation
- Consider giving a draft of what you are considering for the questionnaire/survey. (if included)
Appendices
A- Dissemination Plan
B- Time Line
sample for Goals and objectives section
sample for clientele section
sample for available resources section
References
websites:
http://learnerassociates.net/proposal/
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/shortcourse/index.html
http://education.monash.edu/students/current/study-resources/proposalwriting.html
http://researchguides.library.wisc.edu/content.php?pid=16143&sid=108666
books:
- Grant Writing for Dummies by Beverly A. Browning.
- Designing Successful Grant Proposals by Donald C. Orlich.
Full transcript