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Copy of Idioms (H)

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Shante Nichols

on 10 February 2015

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Transcript of Copy of Idioms (H)

What we are learning today...
What is an Idiom?


Figurative Meaning
: a sample of the unpleasantness that one has been giving other people

Literal Meaning:
to receive the same bad treatment that you just gave to someone else

Example:
If someone is rude to you, and you are rude back to them it would be giving them a taste of their own medicine

Etymology:
The saying “a taste of your own medicine” comes from one of Æesop’s fables.

You're Killing Me!
Literal Definition
: A person might think that you are actually killing them.

Figurative Definition
: Used in reference to being let down by an individual who is not doing their share of work.

Example
: Thanks Frank, once again you didn't complete the assignment, ughhh you're killing me!!

Etymology (Origin)
: From a 1993 movie called the "Sandlot"
Idioms
A group of words established by usage of expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meaning of its constituent elements.
It's a piece of cake!
You're Killing Me!
Literal Definition: The person expresses extreme discontent or frustration towards someone for their lack of knowledge.

Figurative Definition: A person is laughing so hard that they can not contain their excitement or shock.

Example: "You're killing me smalls!" Movie quote

Etymology (Origin): From a 1993 movie called the "Sandlot"
A Taste of one's own medicine!
A Taste of One's own Medicine!
Literal Meaning: Piece of cake means literally a piece of cake.
Figurative meaning: "Piece of cake" an activity that requires little effort to finish; a job that's simple; easy.
Example: To do the report for the board meeting was a "piece of cake."
Etymology of the phrase 'piece of cake'
The figurative meaning of this phrase goes back to at least the 1930s. The term used by an American poet named Ogden Nash, who wrote Primrose Path in 1936. There's a quote from it that reads:
"Her picture's in the papers now, And life's a piece of cake."
It was thought that this idiom originated in the 1870s when it was tradition to give cakes as prizes in competitions. In some parts of the US at this time, slaves would participate in 'cake walks' where couples would perform a dance mocking the mannerism of their masters. The most graceful couple would receive a cake as a prize. From this, the expression 'a piece of cake' started being used to describe something that was easy to achieve.
Etymology of 'piece of cake'
References
A Taste of your own Medicine Illustration
a taste of own medicine. (n.d.) McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. (2002). Retrieved January 30 2015 fromhttp://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/a+taste+of+own+medicine.

B., J., & Hughes, M. (n.d.). What does "Alive and Kicking" mean? Retrieved February 2, 2015, from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-alive-and-kicking-mean.htm

dose of one's own medicine. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Retrieved February 01, 2015, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/dose of one's own medicine

Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"

Irick, G. (2011). Urban Dictionary. Retrieved from: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=you're+killing+me

N.a. (1993). Sandlot. Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com

N.a. (2011). Urban Dictionary. Retrieved from: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=You're+killing+me+smalls

n.a., (1998). Idiom of the Week. Bloomsbury International. Retrieved from : http://www.bloomsbury-international.com/en/student-ezone/idiom-of-the-week/list-of-itioms/98-a-piece-of-cake.html

n.a., (n.d.). A Piece of Cake. Know your phrase. Retrieved from http://www.knowyourphrase.com/phrase-meanings/Piece-Of-Cake.html

n.a., (n.d.). How to Speak English Step-by-Step. Retrieved from: www.marcuswhelan.com


Shante Nichols, Chelsea Freeland, Wendy Meyer, & Cameron Reyes
Here is the movie scene for
"You're Killing Me Smalls!"
Alive and Kicking!
Literal Meaning: Something that was thought to be dead is in fact alive and wildly kicking its legs.

Figurative Meaning: In reference to something that seems to be going out of style but is in fact still popular.

Example: I thought the parachute pants were out of style, but they're definitely still alive and kicking.

Etymology: Used by an anonymous 'crab-boy' during an interview from the travelogue
Farther excursions of the observant pedestrian
Full transcript