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Copy of Understanding Earth and Space Systems

Unit Plan
by

Nancy Crane

on 22 April 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Understanding Earth and Space Systems

Rich Task Understanding Earth
and
Space Systems
Unit Plan Trip to Ontario Science Centre Science Lesson Plan
Mathematics Lesson Plan Language Lesson Plan Arts Lesson Plan Brochure Test Unit Summative Assessments Unit Plan Abstract
The project is designed in conjunction with the Ontario Science Curriculum and is specifically developed for a grade six class in the Peel School District. It is developed in conjunction with the Science Strand “Understanding Earth and Space Systems. The overall Big Idea to be derived from this unit is to get students understanding that Earth is a part of a large interrelated system and that with development of technology, human beings are privileged to study about space.
The teaching and learning processes will include a field trip to the Ontario Science Centre’s Planetarium, class projects and a wealth of rich classroom experiences. The project is comprised of a unit plan, documents related to the field trip, integrated lesson plans and formative and summative assessments.

Strand: Understanding Earth and Space Systems
Unit Title: Understanding Earth and Space Systems
Estimated Time: One Month
Class: Grade 6
Expectations From the Ontario Curriculum

Language Arts
1. O1. Overall- Listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for
2. a variety of purposes;
3. O2 Overall- Use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences
for a variety of purposes
4. R 3.3 -Read appropriate texts with expression and confidence, adjusting reading strategies and reading rate to match the form and purpose
5. R1 Overall - Read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, graphic, and informational
texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
1. W1 Overall- Generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience
2. W3.2- Spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol relationships, word structures, word meanings, and generalizations about spelling
3. ML3.4- Use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g. use a graphic organizer to identify and order main ideas and supporting details for a report about how science and technology can help humans adapt to life in space) Science
2. -investigate characteristics of the system of which the earth is a part and the relationship between the earth, the sun, and the moon
1.1 -assess the contributions of Canadians to the exploration and scientific understanding of space
2.3 -use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate scientific and technological advances that allow humans to adapt to life in space
2.4 -use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including axis, tilt, rotation, revolution, planets, moons, comets, and asteroids in oral and written communication
2.5 -use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g. use a graphic organizer to identify and order main ideas and supporting details for a report about how science and technology can help humans adapt to life in space)
3.1 -identify components of the solar system, including the sun, the earth, and other planets, natural satellites comets, asteroids, and meteoroids and describe their physical characteristics in qualitative terms
3.2 identify the bodies in space that emit light and those that reflect light
3.3 -explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space
3.4 identify the technological tools and devices needed for space exploration

Mathematics
11.M- develop and apply reasoning skills (e.g., classification, recognition of relationships, use of counter-examples) to make and investigate conjectures and construct and defend arguments
12.M- demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem(e.g., by comparing and adjusting strategies used, by explaining why they think their results are reasonable, by recording their thinking in a math journal)
Consolidated Questions/Big Ideas to Guide Learning:
1. Why is it possible for the planets to orbit without collision?
2. Identify the components of the solar system?
3. How has technology helped human beings to understand Earth and Space Systems?
What impact might space exploration have on our society? Summative Assessment Tasks
1. The Rich Task
2. Brochure Project
3. Tests
4. Reflection Journal
Formative Assessment
• Rubric
• Anecdotal Record
• Observational Checklists
• Success Criteria
Reading
• Research
• Instructions
• Assignment
• Library
• Class texts
• Electronic texts
Writing
• Instructions
• Reflections
• Tests
• Reports
• Journal entries
Oral Communication
• Group collaborations
• Group Presentations
• Discussions
Media Literacy
• Research
• Video
• Still Camera
Science and Technology
• Research
• Group meeting
• Test
• Discussions
Math
• Rolling dice
• Counting spaces
• Designing board/measurement
Science
• Research
• Group meeting
• Test
• Discussion Mathematics
9. 2.1 Select and justify the appropriate metric unit (i.e., millimeter, centimeter, decimeter, metre , decameter, Kilometer) to measure length or distance in a given real-life situation
10. 2.2 Solve problems requiring conversion from larger to smaller units (e.g., metres to centimeters, kilograms to grams, litres to milliliters)
Mathematics
11. M- develop and apply reasoning skills (e.g., classification, recognition of relationships, use of counter-examples) to make and investigate conjectures and construct and defend arguments
12. M- demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem(e.g., by comparing and adjusting strategies used, by explaining why they think their results are reasonable, by recording their thinking in a math journal) Behaviour expectations during the trip to Ontario Science Centre



• keep your hands to yourselves
• do not run in the exhibition halls
• do not leave the museum
• speak in quiet voices
• don’t throw anything
• do not bring food or drink into the galleries and do not chew gum
• stay together in your group and remain within sight of your supervisor
• display your best behavior to your group members and other visitors
• wear your badge during the whole visit

Before Trip Lesson – 2 class periods

Objective:
-To review previously taught information and vocabulary about space systems
-To stimulate students’ interest for the trip
-To review rules of behaviour during a trip and present students with the detailed schedule for the trip day

Motivation/Anticipatory Set:
-Students play Space Cards Game (appendix 4)
Game rules:
Students are grouped in groups of four. Cards are stacked in the middle with the definition side up. First student draws a card, reads the information on it, and speaks the answer. Wrong answers result in elimination.
-Teacher communicates the objective of the trip: to build an understanding about The Solar System and space exploration
-Teacher introduces the field trip to students with the projection of the online virtual tour of Ontario Science Centre found at http://www.ontariosciencecentre.ca/tour/default.asp, and a brief description of the program and the presentation students will attend.
-Teacher leads a discussion session to determine what the students expect to see and learn during the Field Trip.
Topics to discuss:
Discuss some of the psychological and physical problems of human ventures into space
Compare the advantages and disadvantages of space missions which carry humans and ones which only carry remote equipment
-Teacher circulates a pamphlet from Ontario Science Centre around the class to give students a better understanding of the place (pamphlet attached).
-Teacher reviews behavior expectations for the field trip with students. (Appendix 2)
-Teacher shows students a map of the floor level they will be on.
-Teacher groups students into groups of ten and introduces their group supervisor for the trip.
-As a class brainstorm a set of standards of conduct for the trip and discuss suggested spending money, lunch plans, appropriate clothing to wear for the trip including gear for rainy weather.
-Discuss with students how to ask good questions and brainstorm a list of open-ended observation questions to gather information during the visit. Record questions on chart paper or in student field trip journals.
-Overview the field trip schedule.

Assessment: observation, anecdotal (appendix 5)

Trip
The trip will be taken at the beginning of the unit Understanding Earth and Space Systems, after an introductory lesson about the main components of the solar system (Sun, planets, Moon, Earth, comets, asteroids)
Objective:
To get a deeper understanding of the components of solar system and their physical characteristics.
To evaluate what space exploration involves in terms of cost, benefits, and how is impacting our lives.

Activities at the Science Centre:
Mars Explored- Interactive Science Presentation- 45 min
Expectations covered:
Strand: Understanding Earth and Space Systems
1.1 -assess the contributions of Canadians to the exploration and scientific understanding of space
2.3 -use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate scientific and technological advances that allow humans to adapt to life in space
3.1 -identify components of the solar system, including the sun, the earth, and other planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and meteoroids, and describe their physical characteristics in qualitative terms
3.3 -explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space
3.4 -identify the technological tools and devices needed for space exploration
Solar System Revealed Program- 45 min
Expectations covered:
Strand: Understanding Earth and Space Systems
3.1 identify components of the solar system, including the sun, the earth, and other planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and meteoroids, and describe their physical characteristics in qualitative terms
3.2 identify the bodies in space that emit light and those that reflect light
3.4 identify the technological tools and devices needed for space exploration
-Teacher asks follow up questions as students make observations and listen to presentations
What would it be like to visit the Red Planet?
How would you survive there?
Does life exist on this most Earth-like of the planets?
Can you count the moons of Jupiter? How many there are?
How many rings does Saturn have?
-Teacher hands out inquiry sheets and asks students to explore the Space Shuttle and the Solar System Orrery in Space Exhibition Hall, and answer the questions on their handouts.
Trip Assessment: rubric (appendix 6) After Trip Lesson- 2 class periods
-Have students choose which of the two activities at the Science Centre was their favourite
-Teacher divides class into groups based on students’ preferences and holds a group meeting
-Students will present their impressions and significant learnings in a journal entry
-The class composes and sends thank-you letters to the field trip site host, chaperones, school administrators and other persons that supported the field trip. Include favorite objects or special information learned during the field trip.
Assessment: anecdotal (appendix 5)

Evaluating the trip
Teacher completes a "Teacher Journal" regarding the field trip. This will provide a good reference for future field trips.
-What was of unique educational value in this field trip?
-Did the students meet the objectives/expectations?
-Was there adequate time?
-Was there adequate staff and adult supervision?
-What might be done differently to make this an even better experience in the future?
-What special points should be emphasized next time?
-What special problems should be addressed in the future?
-What would improve a visit to this site in the future?
-Teacher shares the evaluation with the students, volunteers, hosts from the field trip site, and school administrators.


Intended Student Outcomes:
Science
- 2.4 -use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including axis, tilt, rotation, revolution, planets, moons, comets, and asteroids in oral and written communication
- 2.5 -use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g. use a graphic organizer to identify and order main ideas and supporting details for a report about how science and technology can help humans adapt to life in space)
- 3.1 -identify components of the solar system, including the sun, the earth, and other planets, natural satellites comets, asteroids, and meteoroids and describe their physical characteristics in qualitative terms

Mathematics
- develop and apply reasoning skills (e.g., classification, recognition of relationships, use of counter-examples) to make and investigate conjectures and construct and defend arguments
- demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem(e.g., by comparing and adjusting strategies used, by explaining why they think their results are reasonable, by recording their thinking in a math journal)

Language
- R1 -read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, graphic, and informational texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning
- W1 -generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience
- O1.2 -demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behavior by adapting active listening strategies to suit a variety of situations, including work in groups
- O2 -use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes

Rationale:
Students will perform basic research on one planet
Students will communicate findings
Students will compare and contrast the planets of the Solar System by composition

Motivation/Anticipatory Set:
-Play the game Pass the Ball with the students. In this game, nobody wants to hold the rubber ball! To begin the game, all students sit in a circle. Teacher selects one person to be IT. That person holds the ball. The teacher says to the person holding the ball, "Name three planets. Pass the ball!" As soon as the teacher says, "Pass the ball," the person holding the ball passes it to the right. Students quickly pass the ball around the circle. If it returns to the original holder before he or she can name three planets, the holder is out and the person to his right is the new IT. Otherwise, the person holding the ball when IT finishes listing three planets is the new IT.
-More questions for the game:
-“Say a word related to the solar systems, which start with an A”. (C, E, M, and S)

Activate and develop prior knowledge:
-Teacher leads discussion about the celestial objects and their physical properties, they have observed during the visit at the Science Centre
-Students will have previously had an introductory lesson on planets and celestial objects (asteroids, comets, moons, stars).

Student Engagement/Procedures:
- Teacher communicates students the objective of the lesson – to group the planets in our solar system by composition
- Teacher introduces new vocabulary
- Composition - The nature of something's ingredients or constituents; the way in which a whole or mixture is made up.
- Gas giant – large planets that are not made of rock or other solid material (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune)
- Rocky planet – smaller planets made up of rocks and solid material (Venus, Earth, Mars)

Characteristics of Planets Task - independent
- Teacher distributes the “Characteristics of Planets” worksheet (attached).
- Teacher groups students in pairs.
- Teacher instructs each pair to find the information on the worksheet on one planet they choose.
- Teacher keeps track of chosen planets so that no more than one pair will research a planet.
- Students may use websites, the library, classroom textbooks.
- Suggested websites:
- http://kids.nineplanets.org/
- http://www.kidsastronomy.com/solar_system.htm
- http://www.planetsforkids.org/
- Teacher reviews proper computer use procedures.

Compare and Contrast the Planets Task - group
- Once students have completed their research, teacher explains that there are many ways we can classify the planets of the Solar System- such as size, composition, distance from the Sun, history, etc., and that today we will group the eight planets into two categories by composition.
- Teacher groups students in groups of 8.
- In their group, using the information they have gathered on the “Characteristics of Planets” worksheets, students fill out the “Comparison of Rocky and Gas Planets” graphic organizer (attached), which classifies planets by composition.
- A class discussion follows; students should answer the following questions:
- Which planets have the same composition?
- Which planets have different composition?
- How are rocky planets different from the gas giants?
- How are planets with the same composition similar?
- Students should observe that inner planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars) are solid, and outer planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) are gaseous
Closure:
-Students solve the “Planets Crossword” (attached) in groups of four, then trade sheets to share their answers
Accommodations/Modifications:
-Students can be guided by a partner for their internet research, allowing for peer teaching which will benefit both students’ learning.
Ongoing Assessment/Evaluation:
-Formative- observation, anecdotal
-Summative- quiz (attached)
Implementation Procedures – Materials/Equipment/Technology:
-Worksheets
-Computers with internet connection
-Projector Intended Student Outcomes: Students will be able to
• Estimate, measure and record quantities
• Solve problems requiring conversion of metric units
• Relate mathematical concepts to phenomena drawn from other contexts
Curriculum Expectations:
Mathematics
2.1 Select and justify the appropriate metric unit (i.e., millimeter, centimeter, decimeter, metre , decameter, Kilometer) to measure length or distance in a given real-life situation
2.2 Solve problems requiring conversion from larger to smaller units (e.g., metres to centimeters, kilograms to grams, litres to milliliters)
Science
-Understanding basic concept
-Investigate characteristics of the systems of which earth is a part and the relationship b/w the earth , the sun and the moon
Language
R1 Read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of graphic, and informational texts, using a range of strategies
W1 Generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience

Motivation/Anticipatory Set:
Teacher will begin the class with a game ’Pick the Card’ which will help them recall how to move the decimal points to convert units.

Mental set:
Play the game Pick the card with the students. To begin the game, all students sit in a circle. Teacher has a collection of cards with a number and metric prefix on each of them (e.g.5.0 cm). The teacher selects one child to pick a card .The child reads the number loudly and passes the card to next child either to his left or right. If the child passes the card to his right, the child (B) who gets the card converts the number along with its unit (moving the decimal left/right rule) and says the number loudly( 50mm) and if the child passes the card to his left, the child(c) who gets the card converts it to 0.5 decametre (using the same rule).
The game continues in this way until all the cards are passed.
Teacher can also modify the game by asking to convert the number on the card to a specific metric prefix. Then the child will have to move the card accordingly.


Content
Teacher Communicate students the objective of the lesson –Different metric units and their conversion.
Emphasis is laid upon measurable attributes of objects and process involved in measurement.
A simple way to remember the conversion is introduced i.e.
‘My Cat Doesn’t Mind Drinking Hot Kool-aid’
Teacher explains that “A number combined with a physical unit creates a physical quantity that is the characteristic of an object”
Example: a number 5 with physical unit ‘g’ makes 5g which is the MASS
The Same number 5 with physical unit ‘m’ makes 5m which is the LENGTH
Hence, the words LENGTH and MASS are introduced
Few problems will be solved in the class which will involve class participation
Student Engagement/Procedures:
Selection and Estimation Task- Independent
Teacher distributes the “Selection and Estimation” graphic organiser (attached). Students are asked to select an appropriate unit to measure each object listed and then estimate their value using their observation and understanding. Students may use websites and textbooks.
Suggested website: http://www.planetsforkids.com
Convert the Units Task - Group
Once students have completed their graphic organiser independently, they are divided into groups of three. Each group is provided with 4 objects, 1ruler and 1 weighing scale. The Teacher instructs each group to measure the exact length of 2 object (units specified) with the ruler and exact mass of 2 objects (units specified) using a weighing scale and record the observations. Then they are asked to convert all the measured values into different units and record their findings in the given format (attached).
Groups share their results with the class. Groups should answer the following questions:
Which of the two objects have greater Length?
Which of the two objects have greater Mass?
According to you, which are the most appropriate unit to measure the objects provided? Why?
Which are the most appropriate units to measure distances in space? Why?
Closure:
Teacher introduces and hand out ‘Measurement Mania’ quiz (attached) . Students solve the quiz and check their answers with their groups.
Accommodations/Modifications:
Differentiated instruction and assignment- considering Multiple Intelligence, ESL Learners
Ongoing Assessment/Evaluation:
•Observation: Ongoing assessment of students measuring and recording results in group task
•Students will solve Quiz based on unit conversion and measurement
Implementation Procedures – Materials/Equipment/Technology:
Materials
•Textbook- Math Sense(Grade 6)
•Other-Cards, weighing scale, measuring cylinder, ruler, collection of 3-D objects
Resources
•Internet :Suggested Websites:
http://www.mathmastery.com
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/lac/numbers/chi.shtml
•Library
Subject: Language Arts (Integrated Approach)
Subtopic: Reading and Writing Workshops
Today’s Theme: Reading and Writing about Earth and Space
Class: Grade 6
Literacy Block: (90 Minutes)
Teacher: Angella Richard-James
Specific Expectations
• R 3.3 read appropriate texts with expression and confidence, adjusting reading strategies and reading rate to match the form and purpose
• W1.2 Generate ideas about a potential topic and identify those most appropriate for the purpose
• W3.2 Spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol relationships, word structures, word meanings, and generalizations about spelling
• S2.4 Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including rotation, revolution, satellites, planets, moons, comets, and asteroids, in oral and written communication
Materials: word cards, word-meaning strips, chart paper, markers, Smart Board, computer….
Spelling Words: revolution, objects, orbit, revolve, clockwise, elliptical, galaxy, Jupiter, system, meteor, asteroid, satellites, revolving (All week)
Reading Workshop (45 minutes)
Read-Aloud (15 minutes)
Teacher will introduce the non-fiction book entitled: My First Book of the Planets
Before Reading
To activate prior knowledge, a brainstorming exercise will be fostered. Example of questions:
What does the title suggest? Tell me what you know about Solar System? What comes to mind as they view the illustrations?)
In pairs, students will be given questions for purposeful listening. Examples of questions are as follows:
1.Why is earth the only planet with living things?
2.Where is the sun when you are not seeing it?
3.What would happen if each planet did not have its own orbit?
During Reading
Teacher will read the book and model the following reading strategies: Think-aloud, Making predictions and Self-correction and rereading
Post Reading
Each group will share their response for the question as teacher facilitates brief discussion.
Word Work (10 minutes)
Charades
Students will meet in the class community meeting area to participate in a charade to help to consolidate spelling words which were introduced the day before.
Teacher will explains the object of the game as follows:
1.Each child takes turn to pick a spelling word from a hat and act out the word without making a sound.
1.Clue-words will be provided under four headings, (Number of Letters, Meaning of the word, Size-for object represented by the word), Space-if the word relate to space) on a chart paper.
2.The Game invites a child to pick a word. If s/ he cannot read the word, offer assistance and whisper the word into his/her ear so that no one else hears. Ask student to point to the topic that matches his word, in order to give the class a clue. Then invite him/her to act out the word. The child who guesses correctly will be next to play. The game continues likewise until all the words are covered.
3.As the game is being played, the class will be encouraged to:
•review the word list and try to identify the word that is being dramatized.
•develop memory skills
• recall the words that were already used
They will be encouraged to play the game during the week outdoors with another class in their free time or at home with family members.
Shared, Guided and Independent Reading (30 minutes)
Shared Reading (12 minutes)
Teacher and students will do share reading of poem entitled The Forgotten Planet. This reading is for pleasure. (See appendix1)
Each heterogeneous group gets a section of the poem to do as a choral presentation. (E.g. high tone, accent, slow/timely pace, singy voice).
After groups presentations, teacher and students will share brief thought about the poem.
The main thought will be based on their thoughts and understanding of it.
Guided Reading (18 minutes)
Teacher will now allow students to work on short reading task in their instructional Groups.
Group 1-Guided reading with teacher DRA-Space Dod the Hero-Level 28
Group 2-Independent Reading (Online Story) The First Annual Planet Award http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosmic_kids/stories_from_space/index.html
Group 3- Independent Reading in the class Library-Text related to today’s theme
Group 4- Listening Centre- Students use ear-phones, CD and CD player in this Centre to listen to story related to Earth and Space
Follow Up Activity
Journal Entries- under anyone of their journal entry topics: (See example of Reader Response in Appendix 4)
1. My Critical Review
2. An Important Big Idea
3. Making Meaningful Connection to Self or,
4. Visualize to Understand Writing Workshop (45 minutes)
Mental Starter
To capture students attention teacher will tell them it’s time to listen to the news. This will be a report about Miss Tuffet (appendix2) recorded by teacher and will be aired as students listen attentively.
On the SMART Board will be displays of Wh words Who, What, Where, when, How, Why.
Using the questioning technique, after the news, teacher will foster the following questions: Who were the persons mentioned in the news? When did the incident take place? Why does the reporter think it is necessary to air this story?
Mini-Lesson
Students’ responses will be recorded on the SMART Board. Having a framework and an understanding of students’ prior knowledge, teacher will now share from the overhead projector some clips that explicitly explain what a report is and how to write a report.
Content will include-
1.Organizing and summarizing that is, what information is necessary to share
2.Outlining writing- that is, using sub-headings for each events the information
3.Guide words-Who when etc.
Students will be directed to visit the website in or outside of class to learn about how some Grade Six Students write reports.
http://www.tenan.vuurwerk.nl/reports/eversdal/grade6.htm
Students will move away in their groups to reflect on their field trip to the Science Centre. They will each be given a sheet of Chart paper with the headings Who, What, When, Where, Why, and markers to brainstorm and record information specific to their Science Centre field trip.
The groups will post their charts on the wall and move around the class to view each group’s work.
They will later gather in the class community area where they will all share what they think about the information and how it can be used to develop a report similar to the example they had before.
As a means of modeling, teacher will have them see the actual news report this time from PowerPoint. Teacher and student will work together to develop success criteria for report writing
Follow-Up Activity- See Appendices 6, 7 and 8 For differentiated writing tasks.
Students will work in their instructional Groups to do first draft for their report about Earth and Space Experience.
Accommodation
Teacher will take into consideration that not all students learn at the same pace and style. So, plans will be put in place to foster students’ Multiple Intelligences, ESL Learners and students on IEPs.
Formative Assessment
• Groups will be assessed for their ability to follow instruction. Their writing will be examined to see whether they followed the conventions previously taught in grade six.
• Anecdotal Record-Teacher will use this especially with the Guided Reading Group to record their strengths and any concerns noticed.
• Observation-Teacher will observe students behavior as they collaborate for teamwork, how they performed doing their designated role in the groups, their creativity among other things.
Students will use success criteria to guide them through the writing task. They will continue other stages of the writing in later Language Arts classes.
Mobiles – Alexander Calder
Intended Student Outcomes:
Art:
-identify colour relationships, using a basic colour wheel that they have made (e.g., the combination of a primary and a secondary colour will create a tertiary colour such as blue-green)
-identify the most appropriate tools, materials, and techniques for the size and scope of the work and use them correctly
-produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate a range of thoughts, feelings, and ideas for specific purposes and to specific audiences
-demonstrate awareness that an artist intentionally uses some of the elements and principles of design to convey meaning, and explain how the artist accomplishes his or her intentions
Math:
-construct a rectangle, a square, a triangle, and a parallelogram, using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, geoboard, dynamic geometry software, grid paper)
-measure and construct angles up to 180° using a protractor, and classify them as acute, right, obtuse, or straight angles;
-construct polygons using a variety of tools, given angle and side measurements
Science:
-use scientific inquiry/research skills (see page 15) to investigate scientific and techno- logical advances that allow humans to adapt to life in space
-use appropriate science and technology vocab- ulary, including axis, tilt, rotation, revolution, planets, moons, comets, and asteroids, in oral and written communication
-use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graph- ic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes(e.g., use a graphic organizer to identify and order main ideas and supporting details for a report about how science and technology can help humans adapt to life in space)
-identify components of the solar system, including the sun, the earth, and other planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and meteor- oids, and describe their physical characteristics in qualitative terms (e.g., The earth’s surface is very young; much of it is covered with water. The moon is the earth’s only natural satellite. Comets are the largest objects in our solar sys- tem; their centres contain rock particles trapped in frozen liquid; their tails are made up of gas and dust.)
-identify the bodies in space that emit light (e.g., stars) and those that reflect light (e.g., moons and planets)
-explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space (e.g., obtaining air, water, and food and managing bodily functions)
-identify the technological tools and devices needed for space exploration (e.g., telescopes, spectroscopes, spacecraft, life-support systems)
-describe the effects of the relative positions and motions of the earth, moon, and sun (e.g., use models or simulations to show solar and lunar eclipses, phases of the moon, tides)
Rationale: Students will be introduced to American mobile sculpture artist Alexander Calder, and will use his art as an inspiration to create their own 3D mobile. Students will use their knowledge of polygons to construct 3 dimensional shapes to hang on their mobiles, and paint them using their knowledge of primary, secondary, and tertiary colours. The assignment will aid them in completing their rich task.
Motivation/Anticipatory Set:
- Review last lesson on the colour wheel by playing the true or false game with their red and green cards (red no, green yes). (10 minutes)
- Open new lesson with a question: What is a mobile? What does the word ‘mobile’ mean? Where might you see a mobile? Are mobiles considered to be works of art? (10 minutes)

Student Engagement/Procedures:
-Show quick power point on American mobile sculpture artist Alexander Calder. (20 minutes)
-Introduce the 3D mobile assignment and read through handout with students. Discuss the difference between 2D and 3D. (10 minutes)
-Students will need to collect their group baskets, which will include; scissors, construction paper, glue, paint brushes, paint, water cups, string, rulers.
-Show students how to draw and construct the shapes for their mobile and how to attach the string.
(20 minutes)
-Students will work on constructing their shapes. They will need their colour wheels to pick paint colours for their shapes.
-Show students how to construct the base of their mobile and how to attach the strings to it. (20 minutes)
Closure:
-Students will complete their mobiles and hand it in.
-Introduce Rich Task.
Accommodations/Modifications:
- Power Point presentation is used for all types of learners.
Ongoing Assessment/Evaluation:
- Diagnostic test at beginning of lesson with true or false game.
- Anecdotal notes
Implementation Procedures – Materials/Equipment/Technology:
- Pencils, scissors, construction paper, glue, paint brushes, paint, water cups, string, rulers, tape, hole punch.
- Colour wheels
- Laptop, projector, handout
Reflection: (This section is intentionally left blank as the lesson has not yet been taught.)

What Planet Are You From?

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live on another planet other than Earth? Did you know that researchers at NASA have been studying the resources on Mars so that someday human beings could build and live on it? Did you know that there are people throughout the world now who are trying to buy ‘land’ on Mars
In your community groups, I would like you to research the planet that is in your envelope. Your final goal is to create a 3-D diorama model of your plant and what it would be like to live on it. As a group, you will be presenting your planet to the class. Things that you will need to think about and include are:
1) Where is this planet located (how far away is it from Earth)?
2) What are the planet’s dimensions (size)?
3) Is there gravity on this planet (if not, how would people and buildings stay on the surface/ground)?
4) Is there water on this planet (if not, where and how would people get water)?
5) Is there oxygen on this plant (if not, how would you breathe)?
6) Where will the people on this planet get their food?
7) What is the temperature like? Is it really cold or really hot? (think about what people would need in these temperatures, ex; fire resistant clothing).
Think about the different textures you might want to include to make your planet look real. You can use any kind of material that you can find to create your model. Please include an outline of what you would like to include in your model and how you would like it to look before you start your final piece and hand in to me.

*Remember: This is a group project and everyone will need to participate. In your groups, you will need to find out who can do the best job at the writing, the math, the art, the presenting, and the research. You will all work together to build the final model.
By:
Corina Hasan
Kristina Marx
Geetanjali Malhotra
Angella Richard-James Trip
The trip will be taken at the beginning of the unit Understanding Earth and Space Systems, after an introductory lesson about the main components of the solar system (Sun, planets, Moon, Earth, comets, asteroids)

Objective:
To get a deeper understanding of the components of solar system and their physical characteristics.
To evaluate what space exploration involves in terms of cost, benefits, and how is impacting our lives.

Arts
- identify colour relationships, using a basic colour wheel that they have made (e.g., the combination of a primary and a secondary colour will create a tertiary colour such as blue-green)
- identify the most appropriate tools, materials, and techniques for the size and scope of the work and use them correctly
- produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate a range of thoughts, feelings, and ideas for specific purposes and to specific audiences
- demonstrate awareness that an artist intentionally uses some of the elements and principles of design to convey meaning, and explain how the artist accomplishes his or her intentions
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