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OMNI PROCESSOR AND THE SCARCITY OF WATER

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Caetano Spessato

on 27 August 2015

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Transcript of OMNI PROCESSOR AND THE SCARCITY OF WATER

Omni Processor
Omni Processor
The Omni Processor is sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Janicki Bionergy is responsible for making the processor.
The first commercial Omni processor (OP ), model S200, will be a stationary combined heat and power plant that converts the fecal sludge and other combustible waste streams into electricity, drinking water and ashes.
OUR PROTOTYPE
The idea of our project is to make a functional model of Ominiprocessor.

Caetano Spessato, Filipe Lopez , Murilo Kuhn
The challenge is to turn fecal sludge into drinkable water
Our problem
Our problem is the pollution of water by human waste.
Research we have done...
THANK YOU! <3
Omni Processor and the scarcity of water
The site Planeta Sustentável affirms that
40%
of the world's population already suffers from water shortages. In addition to the increased thirst in the world, lack of water resources has serious economic and political implications for the nations.


We researched about an equipment called
Omni processor
. This equipment is designed to be able to create 86,000 liters of water a day, and 250 kw of electricity from fecal sludge of 100,000 people worldwide.

PHOTOS:
SOURCES:
SEGALA, Mariana. Água: a escassez na abundância. Disponível em:
http://planetasustentavel.abril.com.br/noticia/ambiente/populacao-falta-agua-recursos-hidricos-graves-problemas-economicos-politicos-723513.shtml. Acesso em junho 2015.

JONES, Davy. Bill Gates apresenta máquina que transforma LIXO em água potável e energia elétrica. Disponível em
Acesso em junho 2015.

BIOENERGY. Janicki. Janicki Bioenergy-Omni Processor-S200. Disponível em http://janickibioenergy.com/s200.html Acesso em:
Challenge
In this project we learnt that Omni processor can help diminish the problem of water scarcity in some parts of the world, helping preserve it.
According to Janicki Bioenergy,
toilets in the developing world are most commonly located over pits.

Septic trucks are hired to pump out the sewage and carry it away. Too often, the dumping site for the sewage is a river, stream, bay, ocean, etc., with no further treatment.
Pit latrine - South Africa
Starting to empty the latrine-
West Africa
Empting the septic truck - West Africa
This creates a huge problem. The sewage contaminates the drinking water, causing people to get sick, especially isolated places.
How the Omni Processor works
.
This equipment was thought
to help countries where
there is no sewage or good
sanitary conditions such
as some countries in the
African Continent.
Brazil also has many regions
where the sanitary conditions
are very bad, so this technology
could be researched and
applied here too.
The heat from combustion within a fluidized sand bed is utilized to generate high pressure steam that is expanded in a reciprocating piston steam engine connected to a generator, producing electricity.

The exhaust from this engine (process heat) is used to dry the incoming fecal sludge.

The water that is evaporated out of the sludge is then treated to meet clean drinking water standards.

The combustion gases are treated as necessary to meet local emission standards.
Final Considerations
Full transcript