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Writing a Literacy Narrative

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by

Jeff Newberry

on 2 June 2016

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Transcript of Writing a Literacy Narrative

Good Question!
A narrative essay (story) that addresses some aspect of your personal history with literacy
What's a Literacy Narrative?
Yoda Knows
Essay should address some—any—encounter you have had with the concept of literacy
What Do You Mean By "Literacy?"
From the text
A well-told story
Key Features of a Literacy Narrative
Storytime!
Narratives are stories
What is a Narrative?
Writing a Literacy Narrative
ENGL 1101, Summer 2016
Voice
Elements of Narrative
Narrative in Action
Chronology
Writing a Scene
Good narratives have
presence
Should describe and analyze one important scene, experience, or person who significantly influenced your development as a thinker.
This assignment is open to many interpretations of
linguistic
literacy
Grasping the importance of linguistic understanding?
Understanding the power of reading knowledge?
Knowing how to read?
Think about fairy tales and fables
Narratives can entertain and teach important moral lessons
Narrative implies chronological structure
Narrative from the Old French
gnarus
or "to know"
Why should the reader care?
Shared Insight
SHOW; don’t tell
Concrete and Relevant Details
Tension/problem: without these, no story
Conflict
What happens? Sequence of events
Plot
The narrator, the “I” voice
Good narratives have lots of
details
Good narratives include plenty of
concrete specific examples
Good narrative include
dialogue
The story has a reason for being (a
thesis
)
Good narratives have a point
They place the reader in the action
Scenes that show rather than tell
Some indication of the narrative's significance
WHY are you telling this story?
Appeal to the senses in your writing
Vivid detail
Conflict/resolution
Narrative arc
A scene
advances the thesis/central idea
of the literacy narrative
Scenes have a point; they
illustrate
or show something to the reader
A scene is a
dramatization
of an event
Not a summary
Scenes include
description
and
dialogue
Scenes focus on a
specific moment in time
Full transcript