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Introduction to Shakespeare

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Theresa Warren

on 18 March 2015

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Transcript of Introduction to Shakespeare

Introduction to Shakespeare

Stories
Universal Stories
Style
Pun
Challenges
History
Why Shakespeare?
Found Everywhere!
Stories
Movies
TV shows
Taming of the Shrew
The Simpsons
Romeo & Juliet
Style
Mumford & Sons
Not originally his...
Close to 450 years ago
Translated into over 80 languages
2nd most popular book to be translated after King Jame Bible
Relates to all human life
Globe
Theater
London, England
Was shut down several times due to the black plague.

Burned down in 1613 during a Shakespeare play

It was later rebuild and still exists today
The Higher the level
the higher in society
a person was.
Highest (Royalty)
Middle class (Nobility)
Lowest class
"Groundlings"
Allowed to throw
vegetables if they did
not like the performance
Vocabulary
Style
Introduction to historical Elizabethan period
& Style
Elizabethan Period

Blank Verse
Iambic Pentameter
Sonnets
Prose
Let's Get Started
Bawdy Language
Poetry
How do you Read Shakespeare?
ToDay...
Elizabethan Period Overview
Early Modern English
How to read Shakespeare
Blank Verse
Iambic Pentameter
Sonnets
Prose
A play on words
Mercutio:
Nay gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.


Romeo:
Not I, believe me. You have dancing shoes with
nimble . I have a of lead so stakes me
to the ground I cannot move.
soles
soul
Crude jokes, like the movie Super Bad
He wrote his plays in a poem form that appealed to the upper classes because it was so beautifully done.
Remember this is during the Elizabethan period under the rule of Queen Elizabeth I
The way people speak was common at this time. The English language has shifted since Shakespeare.
It can be difficult to read Early Modern English compared to today's Modern English.
End of part 1
1559-1603 When Queen Elizabeth ruled England.

She ended the Tudors rule when she died in 1603.

Protestant Beliefs inforced
Early Modern English
William Shakespeare
Hamlet
Geoffrey Chaucer
Canterbury Tales
Beowulf
First standard English dictionary was published in 1884 by Oxford
1604 the first English dictionary was created
Read through the punctuation
Use your side notes- there are tons of helpful notes to understand what is being said
Spanish Soap Opera
PRACTICE
Spark notes (not a replacement)
Examples
Can you identify if this piece is a prose or blank verse
What is being said in this passage
The text is written in measured lines that look like poetry, but do not rhyme.
Rhyme
MEter
Form
He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
But soft what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Example
It is always in iambic pentameter

Higher class characters are always written in blank verse or sometimes in a rhyme like a sonnet
The length of a line of verse is measured by counting the stresses. This length is know as the meter!


Is often used for ritualistic or sung effects and for highly lyrical that gives advice or points to a moral.
Have 14 lines
Two households, both alike in dignity,
in fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of those two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventur'd piteous overthrows
Doth with their death bury their parents' strife
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
And the continuance of their parent's rage,
Which but their children's end naught could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which, if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

1
5
10
14
The style it is written in:
Sonnet
Prose
Blank verse
Usually used with lower class characters such at the nurse or servant.

There is no rhyme or meter to this characters speech .
Servant:
Find them out whose names are written here! It is
written that the shoemaker should meddle with his yard and
the tailor with his last, the fisher with his pencil, and the painter with his nets; but I am sent to find those persons
whose names are here writ... I.ii.38-42
He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
But soft what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
The four lines above are approximately equal in length, but they do not cover the whole width of the page as the lines in a story or essay might
iambs
They are unrhymed verse with each line containing ten or eleven syllables.
The ten syllables can be divided into five sections, called .

Each Iamb contains one stressed (\) and one unstressed (U) syllable.
Pentameter
The length is known as the meter and when there are five stresses, as in the previous lines.
Means 5
*Shakespeare was not rigid about this format. He would vary when he felt like it
(Only a terrible actor would deliver lines in a way that makes the rhythm sound obvious or repetitious.
Romeo:
O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in a Ethiop's ear;
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows
A yonder lady o'er her fellows show.
The measure done, I'll watch her place of stand
And, touching hers, make blessed my rude hand.
Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight!
For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.
easier to memorize because it follows a rhyme
Sign out a Romeo & Juliet Book
and turn to page 21
Full transcript