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The Rocks

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by

ruby lander

on 11 September 2013

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Transcript of The Rocks

The Rocks
Conclusion
The Rocks is a significant historical site where you can visit all the old buildings and see how people used to live because the green ban has preserved the area and our heritage.
The Rocks is now a large part of Australian tourism The Rocks is visited by 13 million people each year (tourists, residents and workers)

Interesting Facts

Historical Significance
The Rocks holds a unique place in Sydney’s colonial history and is considered to be the birthplace of European Australia. It is situated, on the western shoreline of Sydney Cove.

In January 1788 a fleet of 11 British ships safely moored in Sydney Cove. The fleet carried convicts doomed to live out their prison terms in this alien land and so began the fascinating story of the founding of a nation.

On this rocky peninsula, convicts replaced the traditional way of life of the Indigenous inhabitants, the Gadigal people.

Early Inhabitants
Present day
Today, The Rocks village has retained its unique heritage qualities in a spectacular picturesque, harbour side location. The ambiance and setting of The Rocks is enhanced by the preservation of the heritage buildings and streets of nineteenth century Sydney.

location
The Rocks is located on the Sydney Harbour shore NSW Australia.
It was named The Rocks by convicts who made homes there from 1788, but has a much older name, Tallawoladah, given by the first owners of this country, the Cadigal people.
When the first epidemic of bubonic plague broke out in Sydney in 1900, all eyes turned to the old working-class waterfront neighbourhoods. The Rocks in particular was seen as the source of contagion. The disease was carried by fleas on the rats which came ashore from ships, so people who worked in these areas were particularly vulnerable, and they bore the brunt of the disease. However, the plague affected many other parts of Sydney too, and of the 303 victims of the plague, only five were from The Rocks.
When the first epidemic of bubonic plague broke out in Sydney in 1900, all eyes turned to the old working-class waterfront neighbourhoods. The Rocks in particular was seen as the source of contagion. The disease was carried by fleas on the rats which came ashore from ships, so people who worked in these areas were particularly vulnerable, and they bore the brunt of the disease. However, the plague affected many other parts of Sydney too, and of the 303 victims of the plague, only five were from The Rocks.
In 1970 the Builders Labourers Federation placed a green ban on The Rocks area. The aim of the green bans was to preserve the built fabric of the place, but also to maintain the community and keep a place for working people in the city.
Playing Beatie Bow, the novel by Ruth Park was set in the Rocks
Among its population were relatively high numbers of immigrant people, including Irish and Chinese. Lower George Street, at the foot of The Rocks, became Sydney's first Chinatown. The area hosted sailors from all over the world, some of whom took a liking to the place, married local women and settled there. Its culture was that of urban working people: drinking, pubs, gambling and sport dominated.
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