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Social and intellectual challenge 1625-88

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Josh Coughlan

on 1 March 2017

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Transcript of Social and intellectual challenge 1625-88

Y12: England 1625-1701
Theme 3: Social and intellectual challenge 1625-88

Key Questions:
Why did the population of Britain increase in the years 1625-88, and what impact did this have?
In what ways did the revolutionary events of the century affect the structure of society?
What changes came about in the fields of science, philosophy and political ideas?

Cinema corner
Know:
The reasons why the population grew in the 1600s.
Understand
:
Why population growth affected the development of towns and cities.
Concept & skills
:
Cause and consequence
Note-taking,
Success criteria:
A
B
C
Judges the main consequences of population growth and creates links.
Explains the impact of population growth on towns and cities using evidence.
Describes how the population grew from 1625 to 1688.
What impact did the Black Death have on England in the 15th century?
Why did the population of Britain increase in the years 1625-88, and what impact did this have on the development of towns and cities?
Know:
The laws that were created to help the poor.
Understand
:
The varying degree of help that the poor laws offered for the poor.
Concept & skills
:
Causation, significance
Note taking, debating
Success criteria:
A
B
C
Assess to what extent government action improved the lives of the poor.
Explains how adequate the Poor Laws were in improving the lives of the poor.
Describes the impact of a growing economy on the poor.
To what extent did the lives of the poor improve during the 17th century?
Reasons for the increase in population 1625-1688
Using pages 67-68 of the textbook make concise notes on the reasons why the population grew during the 17th century.
The impact of population growth on the development of towns and cities
Create three questions
based on what you've
learnt today to ask the
hot seat.
Answer all three questions correctly in the hot seat to win a prize.
Annotate your map using pages 69-70, using the following criteria:
Town/ city impacted
Population growth
Impact of population growth
EXT: What are the main themes of the impact of population growth on towns and cities in England in the 1600s? Provide evidence
How did the growth of London impact the economy?
Impact on rural life - True or False
Using p.71 research if the following statements are true or false, and correct them if needs be.
1 - Around 9,000,000 acres of English land were devoted to the growing of crops, majority consisting of wheat and barley.
2 - More people were able to buy farms during the 17th century, therefore the number of farm owners increased by 200% during the Stuart period.
3 - Employment in agriculture became more reliable than in the cloth industry.
The growth of poverty knowledge check
Read pages 71-73 on the growth of poverty and the
Poor Laws and actions against beggars and vagrants
to answer the following questions in full sentences.
1 - Did towns benefit or suffer as a result of population growth?
2 - Were the existing Elizabethan Poor Laws adequate? Explain your answer
3 - Did the Settlement Act of 1662 improve the prospects of the poor?
EXT: Plan an answer for the lesson's enquiry question
Time to debate
To what extent did the lives of the poor improve during the 17th century?
Improved a lot
Didn't improve a lot
Know:
How the different classes
of society progressed in the
17th century.
Understand
:
Why the Civil War impacted the rise of the gentry.
Concept & skills
:
Cause and consequence,
Evidence gathering.
Success criteria:
A
B
C
Assess which historical interpretation is more accurate.
Explains the historiography of the consequences of the Civil War on society.
Describes the impact of the Civil War on the structure of society.
In what ways did the revolutionary events of the century affect the structure of society?
How permeable is the structure of British society?
What was the structure of 17th century British society?
Create a poster explaining the hierarchy of British society and how it has been impacted.
Nobility
Gentry
Merchants
Professionals
Must include:
Groups must include:
- Statistics of the class
- Defining characteristics
- Life for them in 1625
- Life for them in 1688
- How their class has changed
- Reasons why there has been a growth/fall of the class
Final thought:
Which interpretation of the rise of gentry is more credible?
R.H. Tawney
vs.
H. Trevor-Roper
with guest star
C. Hill
Know:
How the revolution affected the status of women.
Understand
:
To what extent the revolution progressed life for all groups in society.
Concept & skills
:
Cause and consequence,
Evidence gathering.
Success criteria:
A
B
C
Assess which groups progressed the most during the 17th century.
Explains the extent to which groups in society progressed/ regressed.
Describes the impact of the Civil War on the structure of society.
In what ways did the revolutionary events of the century affect the structure of society? PT II
How are women portrayed in traditional Christianity?
The changing status of women
Using pages 76-78 research how the revolutionary events of the 17th century changed the status of women.
Your research must include:
A drawing of a working class woman and a drawing of a middle class woman (venn diagrams for you non-arty folk)
- Similarities in status must be written in the middle
- Religious impacts
Different colour key to represent each bullet point.
- Legal impacts
- Case studies for each to support your research
Choose a group and explain whether you
believe your group was better or worse off in 1688 compared to 1625
Nobility
Gentry
Merchants
Professionals
Women
Success criteria:
A
B
C
Assess which groups progressed the most during the 17th century.
Explains the extent to which groups in society progressed/ regressed.
Describes the impact of the Civil War on the structure of society.
To briefly present in groups on the board
Know:
The political ideas of various 'radical' groups in the Interregnum period.
Understand
:
The impact of these political groups.
Concept:
Cause & consequence
Skills:
Synthesising evidence
Success criteria:
A
B
C
Assess which political group were the most 'dangerous'.
Explains the impact of these 'revolutionary' political ideas.
Describes the various political ideas of radical political groups.
How dangerous were radical political ideas after the execution of Charles I in 1649?
Reasons for growth
Town's/city's expertise
Importance of town/city
Know:
The political theories of Hobbes and Locke.
Understand
:
The impact of these theories on contemporary society.
Concept:
Significance
Skills:
Synthesising evidence
Success criteria:
A
B
C
Assess how relevant their theories are today.
Explains the significance of Hobbes and Locke.
Describes the political theories of Hobbes and Locke.
Know:
The theories of Francis Bacon and Isaac Newton.
Understand
:
The impact of Bacon's and Newton's theories.
Concept:
Significance
Skills:
Synthesising evidence
Success criteria:
A
B
C
What can you see in the source?
What might this source represent?
Radical political ideas
Read pages 78-80 and complete the following table:
Group
Political ideas
Threat to whom?
Impact of group
EXT: Rank most dangerous to least dangerous.
Danger ranking
Levelllers
Fifth Monarchists
Ranters
Diggers
Seekers
& Quakers
Levelllers
Fifth Monarchists
Ranters
Diggers
Seekers
& Quakers
Which group was the most dangerous and why?
Heroes of the Enlightenment
What is the significance of Hobbes and Locke?
What can you see in the image?
What do you think this represents?
Hobbes vs Locke
Use pages 85-86 plus the videos below to take notes.
Biography:
Political theories:
Impact of theories:
Biography:
Political theories:
Impact of theories:
EXT: Relevance of theories to today.
How can we apply theories from Hobbes and Locke today?
What is the significance of the European Scientific Revolution?
Who might
this be?
What theory do you think is being shown here?
The Scientific Revolution in Europe began when Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543) questioned the ancient European astronomical belief that the earth was at the centre of the universe. He made the theory of heliocentrism famous, this is the astronomical model in which the Earth and planets revolve around a relatively stationary Sun at the center of the Solar System. Nicolaus Copernicus' major theory of a heliocentric model was published in De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres), in 1543.
World context:
India
:
Aryabhata
(476–550), in his magnum opus Aryabhatiya (499), propounded a planetary model in which the Earth was taken to be spinning on its axis and the periods of the planets were given with respect to the Sun. He accurately calculated many astronomical constants, such as the periods of the planets, times of the solar and lunar eclipses, and the instantaneous motion of the Moon.
Nilakantha Somayaji
(1444–1544), in his Aryabhatiyabhasya, a commentary on Aryabhata's Aryabhatiya, developed a computational system for a partially heliocentric planetary model, in which the planets orbit the Sun, which in turn orbits the Earth.
Iran:

Al-Biruni, Sijzi
(circa 1020) invented an astrolabe called al-zūraqī based on a belief held by some of his contemporaries He proposed that the motion we see is due to the Earth's movement and not to that of the sky. He believed the Earth rotates around its axis.
Copernicus derived his heliocentric models from Asian and Arab scholars.
Biography:
Scientific theories:
Impact of theories:
Biography:
Scientific theories:
Impact of theories:
Assess the impact of realised theories in Europe.
Explains the significance of Bacon and Newton.
Describes the scientific theories of Bacon and Newton.
Francis Bacon & Isaac Newton
EXT: Relevance of theories to today.
The Royal Society
1. Why was the Royal Society able to be established in 1662?
2. Who made up the Royal Society?
3. Why was the 'Society' more popular
for scholars than Oxford and
Cambridge?
4. What impact did the Royal Society
have on its contemporary society?
5. Why was the Royal Society supported?
EXT: How did 'new' theories contribute to social change?
How did 'new' theories contribute to social change?
History of gravitational theory
India -
Brahmagupta
(598-665) the Indian astronomer and mathematician whose work influenced Arab mathematics in the 9th century, held the view that the earth was spherical and that it attracted objects. Rather than a godly realm of natural motions.
Greece
-
Aristotle's
(384–322 BCE) explanation of gravity is that all bodies move toward their natural place. For the elements earth and water, that place is the center of the (geocentric) universe; the natural place of water is a concentric shell around the earth because earth is heavier; it sinks in water.
History of Empiricism
India -
Ancient Indian philosopher Kanada (unclear 6th – 2nd Century BCE) accepted perception and inference as the only two reliable sources of knowledge. This is enumerated in his work Vaiśeṣika Sūtra.
Greece -
Aristotle (384–322 BCE) experience of sense perceptions still requires the help of the active nous (active intelligence that is innate)
Persia -
11th Century Persian philosopher
Avicenna
argued that knowledge is attained through empirical familiarity with objects in this world, from which one abstracts universal concepts, which can then be further developed through a syllogistic method of reasoning.
Al-Andalus (Muslim Spain) -
The 12th Century Arabic philosopher
Abu Bakr
(or Ibn Tufail: 1105 - 1185) demonstrated the theory of tabula rasa as a thought experiment in which the mind of a feral child develops from a clean slate to that of an adult, in complete isolation from society on a desert island, through experience alone.
Know:
Revisit population growth's impact on social change.
Understand
:
The most significant factor for social change 1625-1688.
Concept:
Significance
Skills:
Essay planning
Success criteria:
A
B
C
How far do you agree that population growth was the most important factor in causing social change between 1625 and 1688?
Assess the most significant factor for social change 1625-1688.
Explains with factors and specific evidence the reasons why society changed in the 1600s.
Describes social change with the use of specific evidence.
Why did the population of Britain increase in the years 1625-88, and what impact did this have on the development of towns and cities?
How far do you agree that population growth was the most important factor in causing social change between 1625 and 1688?
20 marks
Ensure you compare the factor of population growth to at least three other possible reasons for social change.
F
ocus
D
etail (specific)
J
udgement
Plan your answer in preparation for the timed essay next lesson.
Think:
How are you going to create links in your argument?
How are you going to devise factors?
1. What was the Rye House Plot, 1683?
2. What was the Popish Plot, 1678?
3. What consequence did Laud have on English society in the 1600s?
4. Why did Charles II become a fervent persecutor of dissenters?
5. Why did non-conformity survive?
6. Which ordinal direction did three quarters of
the English population live in?
7. Where did economic migrants come from
and what skill did they have?
8. State one reason other than migration why the population grew in the 1600s.
9. Name the two crops that the majority of English
farming consisted of.
10. Why did the poor get poorer in the Stuart era?
11. What was a consequence of the Poor Relief Act, 1662?
12. Why was there a rise of the gentry?
13. Why was there a rise of the merchants?
14. What impact did Puritanism have on women?
Give evidence.
15. State a belief of the Levellers.
16. Why were the Diggers seen as radical?
17. How can it be argued that a confessional state had ended by 1688?
18. What was Hobbes' theory on the rule of government?
19. What was Locke's theory on the rule of government?
20. What was the significance of Francis Bacon?
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