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#GP150w

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Jamie Hynes

on 27 July 2017

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Transcript of #GP150w

#GP150w
Describe General Practice in 150 words
Too long for a glib witticism, too short to be tedious...

This collection goes some way to show how broad General Practice is- in terms of what matters and is most poignant to the writer- from patients to professionals. All entries were submitted, assigned a unique font reflecting the individual nature of opinion, then published using the #GP150w hashtag between May & July 2017.
It's not simple to define General Practice from a single point so this project looks at a collection of perspectives.
You can scroll through in whichever way you see fit; in the path I've selected, or simply by double-clicking on the submission that interests you.
Those that nailed it in exactly 150 words get the star.

I hope you find entries that speak to what GP means to you, and what it means to the author who wrote it.
This synopsis? One hundred and fifty words.
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For me it's the stories. We may have just exchanged pleasantries, before the their book is laid open and the air is thick with emotion. I might be the only person to see those pages.

I watch as my patients are pulled away from their characters. And I'm a stop on their journey to return. Their scripts shape my role; a port in a storm, navigator, advocate, diagnostician, interpreter... and many more.

Their subplots and chapters unfold in real time before me. They interweave with stories of others - many of which I've also read.

For some, the chapter closes, and I may never see them again. For others, it may stay open for years to come. And I don't know what their ending will be. But I can walk with them.

And in return, their stories teach me of the love and grit that exists in society. It's the Greatest Privilege.

Nish Manek
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You know how you're meant to start off descriptions of being a GP with the challenges and the problems? Not happening.
Being a GP I sit down and look at the list to be seen today. I know the faces of more than two-thirds. I know where they live, which of their relatives have died and on a good day which of their kids I'd done the baby check for. When calling them through I can see and can work out in what way they look different to normal- how they're walking, how much eye contact they're making, how they speak, based on what I know about what their version of 'normal' is.
Continuity allows me this privilege
The concentration required to actively listen, negotiate, keep to time and up-to-date is demanding, exhausting and frustrating when not to the level we would like, but rewarding more than any other imaginable career
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Jamie Hynes
@ArtfulDoctor
It's the small things.
Listening to the widow who talks for 20 minutes when I only have 10.
Seeing the distressed patient in the waiting room who is not on my list but knows me and doesn't want to start her story again.
Reassuring parents with worries and fears about their completely normal baby.
Arranging for a bed to be turned to face the window because she has looked at the same wall for months.
Listening to the patient with advanced Parkinson's who is frustrated her words take so long to come out.
Taking the extra minute to give that bit of lifestyle advice that might prompt change and documenting the wishes of the dying patient before they are too unwell to express them.

Fantastic colleagues, interesting diagnoses and complex pharmacology but for me it's the small things I can do for the patients who call me "My GP"
Rachael Marchant
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CHARMER

Challenging - dealing with uncertainty and undifferentiated disease, and needing to instil confidence even when you don't have all the answers.
Humbling when patients trust you with their worries and turn to you for counsel.
Amazing to connect with people and serve a community.
Rewarding to be able to advocate for some of the most vulnerable in society.
Moving to see and palpably fell the struggles people go through in life.
Enjoyable to see such variety, of pathology but also people.
Responsibility but also a real privilege.

Rammya Mathew
Patients
Trainees
Leaders
GP Trainers
Experienced
GPs

I became senior partner aged 31 at my practice after working alongside my mum for three years in 2001, when she retired after spending 27 years at the practice. Not a day goes by without our extremely loyal patients asking after her wellbeing even 16 years after she left!
This emphasises the weight of respect patients place on the family doctor model.
Each day I'm never quite sure what type of problem is going to come through my door next. I recognise names, feel my age when kids I've treated turn up with their babies, and feel genuinely overwhelmed when staff, students and registrars relate stories told to them by our patients about their enjoyable experiences of the care received at our surgery. Would I be happier in another career? I'm not sure anything else could give me the same opportunity for teamwork, enrichment & job satisfaction!

Savio Gaspar, GP Partner since 1998
A few borrowers in the public library where I once worked were GPs. But I only learnt this gradually. You were very well read! But you left a girl feeling inadequate: singing an orchestra, playing international rugby, throwing the best party, raising a family, running a business . . . you left me intrigued.
In the sanctuary of the library, you unwittingly became my ‘patients’. Yet I am no ‘doctor’ (yes, I do like science and I’m glad you know your dysdiadochokinesia and your hyponatraemia). I know I consulted similarly: made intense observations; phrased my words carefully; agreed suggestions, choices, plans. Shared common ground. Dosed people up with just enough kindness so that they could help themselves. Suffered in painful silence.
We are all Doctors in Daily Life, though I still salute you, Registered Ones.
Because when I need it, you know what matters to me.
Glorious Me. Glorious GP.
Helen Todd
today graduating as HCP,
after being inspired to better herself by contact with local GPs!
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Bedrock
Gatekeeper
Abilities
Consistency
Small things
My GP
Listening
Your Story
Understanding
Meaning
Meaningful Communication
Consultation
Perspective
Breadth
Strength
Stability
Flexibility
Dream Career
People
Pride
Balance
Impact
Variety
Change
Trusted friend
Job Specification
Motivation
Optimisation
Running Late
Way Forward
Jack of All Trades
Committing
Symbol of hope
Society
Sustenance
Gratitude
Support
Responsibility
Making a Difference
Identify
Clarify
Ambiguity
Variability
Bigger Picture
Uncertainty
Mindset
Context
When it matters
Acceptance
Silence
Collaboration
Connections
Tactile Art
Patient Satisfaction
Dealing with Uncertainty
Learning
Caring
Humour
Need
Love, Respect & Trust
Never the same
An expert in me
Whole person, Whole picture
Making Sense
Structure & Composition
Role Models
Teamwork
Fulfilment
Enablement
Exceeding Expectations
Stimulating
Value
Rewarding
Privilege
Reflection
Relationships
Choice
Identity
Application of Learning
Worthwhile
Confidence
Security
Staying Positive
Reassurance
Family
Academics &
Clinical Fellows
Full transcript