Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

IMAGE TO TEXT

Manchester Art Gallery and Axis Design
by

Axis

on 22 October 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of IMAGE TO TEXT

Artworks can provoke emotions,
inspire ideas and unlock imaginations.

What follows are a series of approaches to help you
use images as the starting point for a piece of writing.

They invite you to connect with and read visual images,
moving initial ideas into a range of varied,
compelling and unique written responses.
1. Line

Find any point in the painting,
follow the line that it moves along, follow it to the end.
Where has it taken you?
2. Light and Shade

Half close your eyes notice the light and dark areas,
start with the large areas and move into smaller areas.
TIME TO LOOK

Using 3 formal elements

1. Line
2. Light and Shade
3. Colour

Let's explore the painting
3. Colour

Moving round the image clockwise,
notice all the different hues of grey.
It is not possible to explore an image all in one go.
These techniques slow down the process and
help to really see what is there.

Let's talk about what has been discovered.
INVESTIGATING THE PICTURE
ASKING QUESTIONS?

Who, What, Why, When, How?
Divide the class into 5 groups.
Each group has to work with just one of the questions,
how many questions can they ask of the artwork?
CHARACTER BUILDING
Character Traits

What is your characters first memory
What is your character’s biggest flaw
What makes your character angry?
What makes your character happy?
What embarrass your character?
Which one thing can your character never leave home without?
Who does your character most respect
Who does your character most dislike?
What is your character’s deepest regret?
What is your character’s greatest fear
What is your character’s secret wish?

Select five questions and answer them.
PERSONAL CONNECTIONS

Personalise/speak your mind
What you think is important and VALID…. WHAT DO YOU THINK?
What is the first thing that comes in your head
when you see the image?
What does it make you think about?
What do you connect with?
What does it remind you of?
Does it evoke any emotions in you?
FORM
Moving ideas and words into a considered piece of writing

Word Splurge

You are only allowed to use single words
to describe this artwork, fill a sheet of paper.
CHARACTER BUILDING
Taking sides
Let's make some quick decisions about the character
in response to these oppositional questions.

Cat/Dog?
Run/Walk?
Day/Night?
Fast/Slow?
Positive?Negative?
Give/Take?
Help/Ignore?
Laugh/Cry?
City/Countryside?
Friends/Family?
Strong/Weak?
Head/Heart?
Open/Closed?
Sometimes/Always?
CHARACTER BUILDING
Taking sides
Let's make some quick decisions about the character
in response to these oppositional questions.

Cat/Dog?
Run/Walk?
Day/Night?
Fast/Slow?
Positive?Negative?
Give/Take?
Help/Ignore?
Laugh/Cry?
City/Countryside?
Friends/Family?
Strong/Weak?
Head/Heart?
Open/Closed?
Sometimes/Always?
IMAGE TO TEXT

A teaching resource by Manchester Art Gallery,
in partnership with
Tarporley High School and Sixth Form College
and writer Mike Garry.
Kennings

Kennings are an old Anglo Saxon figurative description
of what you see using two words

Explode the words you have written into two words
that describe the image or something you associate with the image

Here are some examples

Chimney

Steam release
Smoke stacker
Wood burner
Coal changer
Smoking joe
Tower inferno
Water

Pea soup
Image catcher
Shadow holder
Ripple reaper
Murky mirror
Dark conscience
Bridge

Traffic carrier
Land connector
Sky route
Route enabler
Pass over
Iron reach
Haiku

Let's expand the words written in the word splurge and the kennings
and write some haiku, you are allowed 17 syllables

The first line has five
The second line has seven
The third line has five

Example:
Winter evening walk
Lost souls on the river bank
Hiding in the mist

Hiding in the mist
Is your Haiku going to be the first line of your extended piece of writing?

Choose to write in from one of the following perspectives:

First Person… You are the man, what is your internal monologue?
Second Person… You are the wife of a missing husband?
Third Person… You see the man, should you call the police?



Solitary soul
A silent sight in ghost town
The man stands alone

The mysterious man

As I look across the dim, dulled docks, amongst all the rubble and unsettled land. I noticed there was a man with broad shoulders and
a turned up hat, standing beneath the rigid bridge. His eyes looked intensely towards the goings on of melancholy Manchester.
Some time later he realised how I was looking at him but he did not
stir nor say a word. he just went back to staring like a statue.



IMAGE TO TEXT

Artworks can provoke emotions,
inspire ideas and unlock imaginations.

What follows are a series of approaches
to help you use images as the starting point
for a piece of writing.


Find any point in the painting,
follow the line that it moves along, follow it to the end.

Half close your eyes notice the light and dark areas,
start with the large areas and move into smaller areas.
Take time to look

Use the formal elements in art to
slow down and explore the painting

1. Line
2. Light and Shade
3. Colour
It is not possible to explore an image all in one go.
These techniques slow down the process and
help you really see what is there.

Talk about what you have discovered.

Who, What, Why, When, How?
You do not have to answer them.
You can personalise your writing by
making connections with the image.

What is the first thing that comes in your head
when you see the image?

What does it make you think about?

What do you connect with?

What does it remind you of?

Does it evoke any emotions in you?
Character Traits

Select 5 of the questions below and answer
them to develop your character.

What is your characters first memory?
What is your character’s biggest flaw?
What makes your character angry?
What makes your character happy?
What embarrasses your character?
Who does your character most respect?
Who does your character most dislike?
What is your character’s deepest regret?
What is your character’s greatest fear?
What is your character’s secret wish?


Word splurge

Create a word splurge, you are only allowed
to use single words to describe the artwork.
Fill a sheet of paper.


You are going to move your single words
into two words with Kennings.
Kennings were used by Anglo Saxons and use two words
to describe an object.




Steam release
Smoke stacker
Wood burner
Coal changer
Smoking joe
Tower inferno





Pea soup
Image catcher
Shadow holder
Ripple reaper
Murky mirror
Dark conscience





Traffic carrier
Land connector
Sky route
Route enabler
Pass over
Iron reach



Now expand the words written in the
word splurge and the kennings to write a haiku.
You are allowed 17 syllables.

The first line has five
The second line has seven
The third line has five

Now it’s time to use your ideas to create a piece of writing.

Will you use the
taking time to look techniques
to help you describe the scene?



The mysterious man

As I look across the dim, dulled docks, amongst all the rubble and unsettled land. I noticed there was a man with broad shoulders and a turned up hat, standing beneath the rigid bridge. His eyes looked intensely towards the goings on of the melancholy Manchester. Some time later he realised how I was looking at him but he did not stir nor say a word. he just went back to staring like a statue.
This resource has been produced as part of the Max Reinhardt Literacy Awards (MRLA) in 2014. MRLA is a pilot programme developed by engage, the National Association for Gallery Education, and the National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE) to enable galleries,
art museums and visual arts venues to support a dedicated programme of creative writing
and literacy work with schools. The Awards are funded by the Max Reinhardt Charitable Trust.

Copyright will remain with the writers, and producing partners: Manchester Art Gallery, Tarporley High School, Mike Garry, engage, the Max Reinhardt Charitable Trust and NAWE.
Chimney



Where has it taken you?
Asking questions of artworks
can help you think in new ways.
You have to work in a group to come up with as many
questions as possible for just one of these.

What makes your character angry?


What is your characters first memory?


Who does your character most respect?



Taking sides

Make some quick decisions about the character
in response to these questions.

Cat / Dog?
Run / Walk?
Day / Night?
Fast / Slow?
Positive / Negative?
Give / Take?
Help / Ignore?
Laugh / Cry?
City / Countryside?
Friends / Family?
Strong / Weak?
Head / Heart?
Open / Closed?
Sometimes / Always?
Look at the questions another group produced,
find your favourite question and answer it.

Winter evening walk
Lost souls on the river bank
Hiding in the mist

Solitary soul
A silent sight in ghost town
The man stands alone


A tired wooden fish
Swimming through wicked pea soup
Coughs in the misty prison

Moving round the image clockwise,
notice all the different hues of grey.

Please visit www.manchestergalleries.org.uk
to find out more about our work with Schools and Colleges

This teaching resource has been produced as part of
the Max Reinhardt Literacy Awards and devised through a partnership
between Manchester Art Gallery, Tarplorley High School and Sixth Form College
and Poet Mike Garry.


Here is Mike Garry, Poet, talking about his reaction to the painting
(press the play button)
Will you use your character questions to write
from the man’s perspective?
Water


Bridge


The mysterious man

As I look across the dim, dulled docks, amongst all the rubble and unsettled land. I noticed there was a man with broad shoulders and a turned up hat, standing beneath the rigid bridge. His eyes looked intensely towards the goings on of the melancholy Manchester. Some time later he realised how I was looking at him but he did not stir nor say a word, he just went back to staring like a statue.
Will you use your Haiku to help form a piece of writing?
Full transcript