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Equality and Diversity

BCU Lecture
by

Stuart Mitchell

on 16 November 2014

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Transcript of Equality and Diversity

do
and
don't

Equality
and
Diversity

is...?
is...?
Examples of discriminatory behaviour
Comments about
physical appearance
,
behaviour that
excludes
,
disadvantages
or
isolates
someone,
being
leered
at or
touched
or subjected to any
unwanted
sexual behaviour,
pornographic
or sexual images being displayed,
racist
literature, language or behaviour,
offensive
or
abusive
graffiti,
suggestive
or offensive remarks (which may be in a language other than the victim’s own) – including email, internet messaging, text messages or websites,
aggressive
or
demeaning
language or behaviour, or
jokes about gender, colour, ethnicity, sexuality or disability.
Guidelines on using language and images
Language reflects attitudes and also helps to define them.

As teachers, trainers, lecturers, support staff, etc. you have a responsibility to use words, phrases and images that do not reinforce offensive or discriminatory attitudes and to avoid terms that may cause offence.

Use of language is of course a personal choice and definitions and meaning of words changes over time but with a little thought, you can ensure that you send out positive messages.
for example: loaded words
Use gay and lesbian, or bisexual rather than homosexual
Use Black, Asian, black and minority ethnic (own preference) rather than coloured
Use woman (so as not to sound dismissive or patronising) rather than girl/lady
Use disabled people rather than handicapped or people with disabilities
Also avoid using male dominated language which can imply women are of less importance than men.
The connotations and significance of words changes over time. Some words that were once widely used are no longer acceptable. Below is some general guidance on terminology:
Brainstorming
and then consider the following word…
for example: media... the power of images
Attitudes, values and beliefs are also portrayed in images. Studies in perception indicate that the impact of images is greater than that of words.

Representation
– it is important to include women as well as men, black and minority ethnic people as well as white people and disabled people as well as none disabled people and people of all sexualities and age.
Role
– people of all types should be portrayed in positions of power, authority and status, not just white older males.
Guidelines for positively acknowledging difference
It is important and often relevant to find ways of acknowledging people's individual differences and group membership without ascribing negative values.
Do:
Focus on the characteristics of individuals
Address individuals by name. Persevere with names that you find difficult so that you can all learn to pronounce each other's names correctly and address one another without hesitation
Use the words racism, sexism, ageism etc. when appropriate e.g. when you want to confront someone about their behaviour
Review your teaching materials to ensure that these reflect a range of views and social identities. For example, topics such as sexuality should be looked at from the point of view of lesbians and gay men and not simply heterosexual people
Don't:
Make derogatory remarks about people from other groups
Generalise apparent group characteristics to individual members of the group e.g. don't ask a black student in a seminar what black people think about the topic under discussion
Decide whether the following words and phrases should be used when describing disability and disabled people.
brainstorming
Source: Equality Guidance for Students – Kirklees College
Taken from: Lewis, V. and Habeshaw, S. (1990) 53 interesting ways to promote equal opportunities in education, Technical and Educational Services Ltd., Bristol
s
s
what next?
welcome to your island
brown
eyes,
blue
eyes
At the very least, social equality includes equal rights under the law, such as security, voting rights, freedom of speech and assembly, the extent of property rights, and equal access to social goods and services.

However, it also includes concepts of economic equity, i.e. access to education, health care and other social securities. It also includes equal opportunities and obligations, and so involves the whole of society.
Recognising the individual as well as group differences, treating people as individuals, and placing positive value on diversity in the community and in the workforce.

Diversity also means celebrating differences to create coherent and happy communities. Many would argue that a diverse community is all the richer for the people in it. However, for it to be truly diverse, everyone within the community must contribute to it and bring their own experiences to the group for a richer shared experience and the education of others.
without prejudice
respect
being equal
embracing difference
variety
being diverse
DNA:
disabled people
mental handicap
suffering from...
learning difficulties
has impaired mobility
spastics
wheelchair user
the disabled
normal
crippled by...
person with...
learning disabilities
wheelchair-bound
impairment
difficulty
uses a wheelchair
disorder
victim of...
partially sighted person
affliction
afflicted by...
handicap
people with cerebral palsy
blind
learning disabled
partially deaf

visually challenged
person who has
person with little sight
confined to a wheelchair
epileptics
visual impairment
the deaf
mental age of...
the blind
condition
profoundly deaf
people with epilepsy
Discriminatory
: Material which reinforces a biased view of the world
The issue here is not to make all materials one category rather than another but to be aware of the equality dimension of materials produced by a provider. It can be wholly appropriate to use a discriminatory piece to stimulate discussion in a lesson. Equally, in designing anti-discriminatory materials, care must be taken to cover the whole spectrum of equality issues.
Anti-discriminatory
: Material designed to be biased to promote a particular strand of equality
Non-discriminatory
: Material which is designed to be free from cultural bias
when did doing something
"
LIKE A GIRL
"
become an insult?
Full transcript