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Year 8: World War Two

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Michael Brodie

on 5 July 2016

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Transcript of Year 8: World War Two

World War Two (1939-1945): Britain's Finest Hour?
How was the Final Solution implemented?
Learning Objectives
Know - The scale of the Holocaust

Understand - How the Holocaust was carried out.

Skills - Empathy, Diversity, Significance
Success Criteria
What were the consequences of the Holocaust?
Describes details of the Holocaust.
Explains how the Holocaust was carried out.
Selects key sources to learn about the Holocaust and justifies why they have been chosen.
TASK 1:

Look at the cards on the sheet. If you could only use five cards to inform people about the Holocaust which would you use?
In your books explain your decision using the phrases below:

The first card I selected was...

From the card you can learn that...

I selected the card because I think it is important that people realise.....
TASK 2: Group Discussion
Write down 2 questions you would like to ask about the Holocaust.
We will discuss these together.
Holocaust Background
What impression of the men do you get from these photographs?
From 1941, the Nazis experimented with gas. They first used mobile gas vans to kill small numbers of Jews at a time.

However, they thought this was inefficient.
As the German army conquered much of Europe during World War Two, millions of Jews came under Nazi control.

A special operations group in the German army callled Einsatzgruppen was set up to 'deal' with the Jewish problem.

This group carried out many mass executions. In September 1941 at Babi Yar in Ukraine over 33,000 Jews were killed in two days.
On 20 January 1942, a conference was held in Wansee, Germany. Here it was decided to find a 'final solution' to the Jewish problem. It was decided here that the the Nazis would try to kill the entire Jewish population of Europe.
F
F
Between 1942 and 1945 6 million Jews were transported from all over Europe to concentration camps (where some were used for slave labour and others murdered) and to death camps (where all were murdered), mostly in gas chambers.
The development of the Holocaust
Learning Objectives
Know - The legacy of the Holocaust.

Understand - Why the Holocaust had such far reaching effects.

Skills - Cause and Consequence, Significance.
Success Criteria
TASK 1: Evidence Harvest
TASK 2: What were the consequences of the Holocaust?
Describes the consequences of the Holocaust.
Uses the consequences of the Holocaust to make an argument about its historical significance.
Makes a judgement on the most important consequence of the Holocaust.
Success Criteria
Describes the consequences of the Holocaust.
Uses the consequences of the Holocaust to make an argument about its historical significance.
Makes a judgement on the most important consequence of the Holocaust.
Step 1: Explain at least 3 consequences of the Holocaust.

Step 2: Explain which is the most important consequence and why.

Step 3: Explain how the consequences make the Holocaust significant.
Who can speak for 30 seconds about why the Holocaust is a significant event?
A Journey through Auschwitz
Write a letter to Dr Wratten explaining why you think the history department should run a trip to Auschwitz-Birkenau.
TASK: Letter Writing
Steps to success
*Give details about Auschwitz-Birkenau and the experience of people there.

*Explain why it is important to learn about the Holocaust.

* Explain what you think you will gain as a person from going.




Around the room are posted 7 different pieces of information about the consequences of the Holocaust. You have 15 minutes to collect ALL the information.
Draw this table on a double page:
Consequence
Details
Importance:
How important it is and why?
What were the causes of World War Two?
The main cause of World War Two was appeasement. How far do you agree with this statement?
Step 1:
Say what your argument is.

Step 2:
Explain appeasement with evidence.

Step 3:
Explain the other causes of World War Two.

Step 4:
Evaluate the causes and make a judgement on the most important.
Learning Objectives
Know - The key causes and events that led to World War Two.

Understand - The relative importance of these causes.

Skills - Causation
Success Criteria
Describes the causes of World War Two
Categorises the causes of World War Two.
Prioritises and evaluates the causes of World War Two.
Success Criteria
Describes the causes of World War Two
Categorises the causes of World War Two.
Prioritises and evaluates the causes of World War Two.
Write down two questions you would like to ask about this photograph and stick them on the board - Think carefully about your question.
Task 1: Causes of the Second World War Worksheet.
Step 1:
Read the 5 Causes of the War and the timeline to war.

Step 2:
Sort the events into long-term, short-term, tipping points and triggers.

Step 3:
Categorise the events to match them with the cause they are linked to (it may be more than one).
What was the most important cause of World War Two?
Appeasement
Failure of the League of Nations
Great Depression
Treaty of Versailles
Hitler's Actions

24.50-43.00

Was Dunkirk a triumph or defeat?
Learning Objectives
Know - The key features of the Dunkirk Evacuation.

Understand - The extent to which the traditional view of Dunkirk as a "triumph" is correct.

Skills - Using evidence, Source Analysis and Interpretations.
Success Criteria
Creates their own interpretation of Dunkirk using evidence.
Describes key features of Dunkirk.
Analyses sources to answer the question "Was Dunkirk a Triumph or Defeat?"
Defeat
Triumph
Was Dunkirk a triumph or defeat?
TASK: Dunkirk Sources
You need to use your analysis of the sources to support your argument in the class discussion.

E.g. Try to quote from them and talk about their usefulness/reliability.
Class Discussion

Steps to success:
1. Examine the source sheet carefully.
2. Complete your worksheet with evidence in each column.
3. Answer the question: Was Dunkirk a Triumph or a Failure? Use evidence from the sources in your work.
Extension:
1. How useful is Source C for explaining the events of Dunkirk?
2. Would Source A or Source B would be used in a British newspaper at the time of Dunkirk? Explain your answer.
How much can you learn about the Dunkirk Evacuation (Operation Dynamo) from these pictures?

How far did Hitler exploit the allies' policy of appeasement before World War Two?
Learning Objectives
Know - .

Understand -

Skills -
Learning Outcomes
TASK: Appeasement Puppet Show
You need to use pp.48-49 to create a finger puppet show telling the story of the lead up to the Second World War.

Try to include the following:

At least 4 short scenes.
Hitler's viewpoint.
The viewpoint of the allies.
Did the Allies deal with the threat of Nazi Germany appropriately?
What was the big picture of World War Two?
TASK: Different Battle Fronts of World War Two
You have to make notes on the different battle fronts. Make sure you take down dates as you will have to make a time line of World War Two later.
TASK: Turning Points
Whilst you watch the video think about the following:

1. When did Germany start to lose the war?
2. What are the key turning points in the video?
Learning Objectives
Know - The different theatres of war of World War Two.

Understand - The chronology of World War Two.

Concept - Chronology

Skills - Chronological understanding and categorising evidence.
Success Criteria
Describes how WW2 developed.
Explains the different theatres of war of WW2.
Creates a timeline of the key events of WW2.
2004
2007
2001
TASK: World War Two Timeline
1939
1946
Draw a timeline and plot your key events on it.
Success Criteria:
* Make appropriate space between events.
*Use both sides of the line.
*Colour code for events in differing theatres of war.
Was the Battle of Britain a turning point in the war?
TASK: V
What is Churchill talking about?

What does he think is going to happen?

What is he proposing to do?

What makes it a successful speech?
TASK: Battle of Britain Mind Map
TASK: Why was the Battle of Britain significant?
Write a couple of paragraphs using the information you have got from the video explaining why the Battle of Britain is significant. In it you should explain:

* How it was groundbreaking.
* How the results were far reaching.
* How it affected the future.
* Why it is remembered by all.

E.g. The first reason why the Battle of Britain is significant is because__________. My evidence for this is_________. This shows that___________.

Make a conclusion on how significant it was.

Remember Point, Evidence, Analysis.

EXTENSION - After the Battle of Britain, Winston Churchill claimed that "Never in the field of human conflict has so much been owed by so many to so few." Do you think he was right? Use evidence to support your answer.

TASK: Peer Assessment
Use the mark scheme to peer assess each others work and give each other a WWW and EBI.
Learning Objectives
Know - What happened during the Battle of Britain.

Understand - Why the Battle of Britain was a significant turning point in World War Two.

Concept - Significance.

Skills - Knowledge, understanding and evaluation.
Success Criteria
Evaluates the significance of the Battle of Britain.
Explains the reasons why Britain won the Battle of Britain.
Describes what Churchill was talking about.
Success Criteria
Describes features of the Battle of Britain.
Evaluates how significant the Battle of Britain was using evidence to support the argument.
Explains different reasons why the Battle of Britain could be seen as significant.
STARTER: What is the message and purpose of these cartoons?
Why was the attack on Pearl Harbor so significant?
TASK: What happened on 7 December 1941 at Pearl Harbour
Watch the video and then describe in your own words what happened at Pearl Harbour.
At 7:55, the Japanese attacked with deadly force. The first wave of 183 planes dropped bombs and fired bullets at the almost defenceless American ships in Pearl Harbour and planes at three nearby airfields.

A second wave of 167 planes followed about an hour later. American sailors fought back, struggling to get their planes off the ground and fire their guns at targets they couldn't quite see.

When the attack was finished, 21 of the 96 ships at anchor had been sunk and others had been severely damaged. Of the 394 planes at Hickam, Wheeler, and Bellows airfields, 188 were destroyed and 159 were damaged. The death total was 2,403 (including 68 civilians). The wounded total was 1,178.
TASK: Why was the attack on Pearl Harbor significant?
Use the video and p.96 to explain the significance of Pearl Harbor.
Success Criteria:
* Explain 3 different reasons why it was significant.
* Make a judgement about the most significant consequences by comparing consequences.
Learning Objectives
Know - What happened at Pearl Harbor.

Understand - Why Pearl Harbor was so significant.

Concept - Significance.

Skills - Knowledge, understanding, analytical writing, peer assessment.
Learning Outcomes
Identifies the message and purpose of a primary source.
Explains what happened at Pearl Harbor.
Analyses the cconsequences of the attack on Pearl Harbor for their significance.
How far was the Battle of Stalingrad a turning point in World War Two?
Learning Objectives
Know - The key features of the Battle of Stalingrad.

Understand - Why the Battle of Stalingrad was a turning point in World War Two.

Concept - Significance.

Skills -Knowledge, understanding and evaluation.
Learning Outcomes
Which was the most significant turning point?
Battle of Britain
Battle of Stalingrad
Attack on Pearl Harbor
Describes the key features of the Eastern Front.
Explains what happened at the Battle of Stalingrad.
Evaluates the significance of the Battle of Stalingrad.
TASK: What happened at Stalingrad?
Write 3 sentences about Stalingrad:

You could discuss: *Conditions,
*The type of fighting, the role of politics etc.
* The level of casualties.
TASK: Stalingrad or bust!
Read pp.68-69 and complete the questions on p.69.
Learning Objectives
Know - Key features of the Blitz.

Understand - The extent to which Londoners coped well with the Blitz.

Concept - Evidence.

Skills - Source analysis and evaluation, PEA writing and peer assessment.
Learning Outcomes
How well did Londoners cope with the Blitz?
TASK: How well did Londoners cope with the Blitz?
Steps to success:
1. Make a judgement.
E.g. I will argue that Londoners coped very well with the relentless bombing during the Blitz.
2. Use evidence from the source to support your argument.
Answer in paragraphs.
E.g. Source A suggests....
3. Make sure you consider points on each side of the debate.
E.g. In contrast I can infer from source B.....

Extension - If working at 5.6 or above - You need to include a discussion about how reliable the evidence is. Remember
Nature, Origin, Purpose.

Use evidence to support your work from the sources.

Remember:
Point
Evidence
Analysis
TASK: Blitz Source Analysis
Look at your source sheet and use it to complete the table:

Step 1: Look at/read the sources

Step 2: Put evidence from the sources in the boxes for Londoners coping/not coping.

Step 3: Examine the sources reliability. Think about their nature (what?), origin (when?, where and who?) an purpose (why?)
Infers key features of the Blitz from primary sources.
Evaluates how well Londoners coped with the Blitz using primary evidence.
Analyses primary sources for evidence of how well Londoners coped with the Blitz.
Reward Bubble
1. Which source is the most reliable and why?

2. Which inference you have made is the most convincing and why?

3. How well did Londoners cope?
STARTER: What inferences can we make about the Blitz from these photographs?
TASK: Purple Pen of Progress
Spend the next 5 minutes
responding to the comments on your work.
TASK: Peer Assessment
Use the mark scheme to peer assess each others work.

Give each other a WWW and an EBI.
Success Criteria
Explains evidence from both sides of the argument.
Makes an overall judgement using evidence from both sides of the argument.
Makes an overall judgement using evidence from both sides of the argument and takes the sources reliability into account.
What happened on the British home front?
TASK: Useful or not useful? That is the question!
Type of evidence
Useful
Not Useful
Newspaper

Cartoon

Photograph

Speech

Diary Entry
Extension: What other types of evidence might a historian use? How might they be both useful and not useful?
1. What is the purpose of this source?

2. How useful is the source for a historian investigating the British home front during World War Two?
Useful
Not useful
Details from the source
Nature, Origin, Purpose
A poster published by the British government during the Second World War
Learning Objectives
Know - The key features of the British home front.

Understand - How to analyse a source for its usefulness.

Concept - Cause and Consequence.

Skills - Knowledge, understanding, peer teaching and source analysis.
Learning Outomes
Assesses the usefulness of different types of evidence.
Evaluates a source for its usefulness.
Explains key features of the British Home Front.
TASK: Each one, Teach One!
Step 1:
In your pairs research the key features of your topic. Come up with 5 key facts and a brief overview - 10 minutes.

Evacuation - p.73.
Women - p.84.
Rationing - p.86.

Step: 2:
Each group on the table teaches the other groups their work.
What was Jewish life in Europe like before WWII?
Why do we take photographs?

How are photographs useful to historians?

How can photographs cause problems for historians?

What questions do we need to ask about photographs as historians?

Learning Objectives
Know - What Jewish life was like before World War Two.

Understand - How to use photographs as evidence.

Concept - Evidence.

Skills - Source analysis, group work, using evidence to support an argument.
Learning Outcomes
Reward Bubble
What themes emerge about pre-war Jewish life by examining the evidence?

What words could we use to describe Jewish life before the war?

Is the evidence useful in helping us to understand why the Nazis targeted the Jews?

HOT QUESTIONS: What other types of evidence could we use to ensure that the inferences we have developed are accurate?

Why would these help?
TASK: Inferring from Photographs
You have three minutes to examine the photographs and answer the questions on the back.

Describe in bullet points!! Not full sentences.

We will swap round after 3 minutes.
TASK: What was Jewish life in Europe like before World War Two?
Argument - What is your overall point or points about Jewish life before the war?
E.g. I will argue that Jewish life before the war was very ordinary.

Detail - Use evidence from the photographs to support your argument.
E.g. I can infer from photograph X that

Judgement - Explain how the evidence helps to tell us about Jewish life before the war. Do we need more/different types of evidence to make an overall judgement?
E.g. It would be useful to have access to...
Explains how to use and analyse photographs.
Analyses photographs to discover features of Jewish life before the war.
Evaluates the evidence to make an argument about Jewish life before World War Two.
Success Criteria
Evaluates how useful the evidence is for telling us about Jewish life before the war.
Describes some features of Jewish life.
Judges the nature of Jewish life before the war.
1. What are laws?

2. Why do we have them?
STARTER: Mind Map
How did Jewish persecution develop over time?
Learning Objectives
Know - Key laws passed by the Nazis which targeted Jews.

Understand - How persecution of the Jews developed over time.

Concept - Chronology

Skills - Ordering, discussion and reflection.
Learning Outcomes
TASK: The Chronology of the Anti-Jewish Laws
Arrange the cards into chronological order
What do you notice happens over the years?


Extension - Can you separate the laws into different stages of development?
TASK: Reflection and Discussion
Individually:
Chose a law which would:
a) Make you sad.
b) Make your life a nuisance.
c) Make you angry.
d) Make you scared.

Explain why you chose these cards.

On your tables discuss the following:

1. How would you respond to these laws?
2. What could the Jews of Germany do about them?
3. Which one law would you stand up against and why?
4. What can you do today if you disagree with something?
Explains what laws are and what their purpose is.
Builds a chronology of the persecution of the Jews.
1. How was the legal system used against the Jews of Germany?

2. What was the human impact of the anti-Jewish laws?

3. How are the laws related to the events of the Holocaust?
PLENARY: Mind Map Improvements
Add anything else you can think of now you have completed the lesson to the mind map you did earlier.
Reflects on the effect o anti-Jewish laws on the Jews of Europe.
TASK: Stalingrad: Turning Point or Not?
Colour code the boxes into those which suggest that Stalingrad was:
1) A significant turning point.
2) Was not a significant turning point.

Challenge: Which argument is most convincing to you and why?
Why was the Pacific War so brutal?
Was the dropping of the atomic bomb justified?
In May 2016, Barack Obama became the first US President to visit Hiroshima. Some people think America should apologise for the bombing. Do you agree?
Learning Objectives
Know
- The build-up to the dropping of the atomic bomb.

Understand
- The arguments for and against the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

Concept
- Evidence

Skills
- Group work, using evidence, and analytical writing and debate.
Learning Outcomes
Review Bubble
What was fighting like in Pacific sphere?

HOT QUESTION: How might this influence American decisions on the war?
Context:
On the 30 April 1945 with the Battle of Berlin raging around him, Adolf Hitler shot himself.

On the 8 May 1945, Germany formally surrendered to the allies, ending the war in Europe. This left Japan, who refused to surrender, alone fighting the might of the US and British armies.

In addition, the Soviet Union was preparing to declare war on Japan.

However, despite overwhelming odds, Japan appeared committed to continue fighting, in what had already been an incredibly brutal theatre of war.
TASK: Should he drop the bomb?
It is August 1945 and you are American President Harry Truman. You must decide how to pursue the war against Japan. Read the different briefings from your advisers and complete the following:

Step 1:

Identify the 3 different options. Discuss the different options and the evidence in favour and against as group.

Step 2:

Complete the pros and cons of each option with
inferences
from the sources.

Step 3:

Decide as a group which decision you will take.

Challenge
-Take into account the reliability of the sources when making your decision.
TASK: Was the dropping of the atomic bomb justified?
Write a PEA paragraph on whether the dropping of the atomic bomb was justified.
Point:

E.g. I believe that the atomic bomb should/should not have been dropped on Hiroshima on 6 August 1945.

Evidence:

E.g. The evidence why the dropping of the bomb was/was not justified includes.....
(Include evidence from your sheet)
Try to cover two sides.

Analysis:

The evidence in support/against dropping the bomb is stronger because....
(Explain why your evidence, on balance, shows that dropping the bomb would be a good or bad thing.
Key Words
Learning Objectives
Know - Key features of the Pacific War.

Understand - Why the Pacific War was frustrating for the Allies.

Concept - Evidence.

Skills - Gathering evidence, analytical writing, peer assessment.
Learning Outcomes
TASK: Pacific Theatre Evidence Harvest
Around the room are different features of the Pacific Front.

Step 1: Collect details on each feature and outline why it could make the Pacific War seem brutal.

Step 2: Write a PEA paragraph explaining Why the Pacific War was so brutal?
Why would the Allies feel frustrated by the Pacific War in 1945?
HOT Question
Describes key features of the Pacific War.
Explains why the Pacific War may be viewed as brutal.
Analyses why the Allies were frustrated with the progress of the Pacific War in 1945.
Success Criteria
Judges whether the atomic bomb should have been dropped by using evidence.
Judges whether the atomic bomb should have been dropped by comparing evidence from different perspectives.
Makes a judgement on whether the dropping of the atomic bomb was justified.
TASK: Peer Assessment
Success Criteria
Judges whether the atomic bomb should have been dropped by using evidence.
Judges whether the atomic bomb should have been dropped by comparing evidence from different perspectives.
Makes a judgement on whether the dropping of the atomic bomb was justified.
Swap books and:
* Give a tick for any evidence used.
* Correct spellings.
*Tick any key words used or any connectives used from the literacy keys.
* Give Gold, Silver or Bronze.
* Write a WWW and EBI.
Infers messages of sources and uses sources for evidence to create an argument.
Identifies key features of Pacific War and how it may have influenced American thinking.
Makes a judgement on whether dropping the atomic bomb was justified by assessing evidence both for and against.
Review Bubble
What factors were most important in making your decision?

Did you change your point of view? If so, why?
Full transcript