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Governing the transition to low-carbon and energy efficient cities: Regulation, markets, and hybrids

22 March 2016
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jeroen van der heijden

on 1 July 2016

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Transcript of Governing the transition to low-carbon and energy efficient cities: Regulation, markets, and hybrids

NY 'Dryline' (design competition, 2014)
Ongoing urbanization
Dr Jeroen van der Heijden
|
Australian National University
|
University of Amsterdam
Governing the transition to low-carbon and energy efficient cities: Regulation, markets, and hybrids
Expected growth until 2050:
Almost doubling of urban population
Almost doubling of built up space
Extreme (weather) events
Buildings, cities, and climate change:
40%-70% global energy use
35%-70% global GHG emissions
Dr Jeroen van der Heijden
|
Australian National University
|
University of Amsterdam
Another part of the puzzle: Getting governance right
?
Dr Jeroen van der Heijden
|
Australian National University
|
University of Amsterdam
The shift towards market instruments
Technology and lifestyle/behavioural change:
Improve resource efficiency
Reduce GHG emissions
Improve climate change resilience
Pros and cons of traditional regulation
Addressing societal risks
Clarity and security for the market
Like cases are treated alike
More compliance
Better fit with local circumstances
Beyond the regulatory bottom-line
High hopes and expectations:
Three dominant types
Certification & classification
Knowledge generation & sharing
Providing funds
Dr Jeroen van der Heijden
|
Australian National University
|
University of Amsterdam
Key-findings
Performance
Bottom-line: marginal impact
Little relative uptake
Little relative improvement
Still, a few well-performing programs
What explains performance according to others?

Club theory perspective
Rules, enforcement, rewards

(Potoski/Prakash, 2009)
Dr Jeroen van der Heijden
|
Australian National University
|
University of Amsterdam
Conclusions: Value of voluntary programs for decarbonising the built environment
Value of voluntary programs in developed economies
Power-laws do not hold here
Marginal or even negative impact of context
Voluntary programs unfit to fill regulatory voids?
Value of voluntary programs in rapidly developing economies
Similarities and overall poor performance
An even more complicated and risky context
Critique to transferring programs from Global North to Global South
Dr Jeroen van der Heijden
|
Australian National University
|
University of Amsterdam
Conclusions: Beyond the leadership delusion
The leadership delusion and beyond
Focus on early market and majority market
Consider hybrids of mandatory-voluntary programs
Consider rolling rule regimes
More fundamental questions
The limits to ecological modernisation
Voluntary programs as industry captured regulatory capitalism
From correcting to directing
Dr Jeroen van der Heijden
|
Australian National University
|
University of Amsterdam
j.j.vanderheijden@anu.edu.au

|
www.jeroenvanderheijden.net
Urban transformation literature
Role of local governments
(Evans et al., 2005)
Diffusion of innovations literature
Diffusion network
(Rogers, 1995)
Questions
Thank you.
Dr Jeroen van der Heijden
|
Australian National University
|
University of Amsterdam
Suggestions for further reading
van der Heijden (2014)
Governance for sustainability and resilience: Responding to climate change and the relevance of the built environment.
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar

van der Heijden (2016)
Opportunities and Risks of the ‘New Urban Governance’ in India: To what extent can it help addressing pressing environmental problems?

Journal of Environment and Development

van der Heijden (2016)
Experimental governance for low-carbon buildings and cities: Value and limits of local action networks
,
Cities

van der Heijden (2015)
The role of government in voluntary environmental programs: A fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis

Public Administration

van der Heijden (2015)
What "works" in environmental policy-design? Lessons from experiments in the Australian and Dutch building sectors
,
Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning,
But more theorised than studied empirically
Require considerable institutional capital
Grandfathering
Focus on objects, not behaviour
Full transcript