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Macbeth- Honour & Loyalty

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Vanessa Vessio

on 3 June 2013

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Transcript of Macbeth- Honour & Loyalty

Macbeth By William Shakespeare Vanessa Vessio “All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Glamis!”
“All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Cawdor!”
“All hail, Macbeth! that shalt be king hereafter.” (1.3.50-53) “The service and the loyalty I owe, in doing it, pays itself. Your highness’ part is to receive our duties” (1.4.25-27) “Let not light see my black and deep desires: the eye wink at the hand! yet let that be, which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.” (1.4.58-60) “A little water clears us of this deed: how easy is it then! Your constancy hath left you unattended.” (2.2.85-87) “And with thy bloody and invisible hand, cancel and tear to pieces that great bond which keeps me pale! Light thickens...” (3.2.53-55) “Why, what care I? If thou canst nod, speak too. If charnel-houses and our graves must send those that we bury back” (3.4.84-86) Theme:
Honour & Loyalty-
In Order for a Society to Properly Function, One Must Remain Loyal to One’s Country and King “All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Glamis!”
“All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Cawdor!”
“All hail, Macbeth! that shalt be king hereafter.” (1.3.50-53)
“The service and the loyalty I owe, in doing it, pays itself. Your highness’ part is to receive our duties” (1.4.25-27)
“Let not light see my black and deep desires: the eye wink at the hand! yet let that be, which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.” (1.4.58-60)
“A little water clears us of this deed: how easy is it then! Your constancy hath left you unattended.” (2.2.85-87)
“And with thy bloody and invisible hand, cancel and tear to pieces that great bond which keeps me pale! Light thickens...” (3.2.53-55)
“Why, what care I? If thou canst nod, speak too. If charnel-houses and our graves must send those that we bury back” (3.4.84-86) Do two wrongs make a right? In the play, Macbeth by William Shakespeare, the theme of honour and loyalty as it relates to order in society evokes three key ideas- conformity, reward, and deception. Macbeth displays many honourable traits and is known for being a man of character. He gains respect by adhering to what society expects of him. When the current thane of Cawdor deceives King Duncan, Macbeth is rewarded for his loyalty. King Duncan then bestows the title, thane of Cawdor to Macbeth. As soon as Macbeth starts to rise in stature, he begins to get consumed with over ambition. When the witches proclaim Macbeth “shalt be king hereafter” (1.3.53) he spirals into a well of deception. While plotting to kill King Duncan, Macbeth claims “the service and loyalty” (1.4.25) is a reward in itself. Since the death of Banquo, Macbeth proceeds to deceive his ghost, “what care” (3.4.84) should Macbeth have, as he still trys to ease his guilty conscience. In contrast, even in his death, Banquo remained loyal, whereas Macbeth took the opposite path. Macbeth and his wife remain honourable members of society, their impending demise will not occur. One bad deed follows another, as their misplaced ambition evolves, yielding catastrophic results. Like Macbeth, many politicians today, enter with many honourable intentions, and then when granted the power, proceed to fall into the trap of corruption. The motif of a tilted royal crown, along with a royal colour scheme is reflected in the presentation. The crown represents King Duncan and ultimately Macbeth. The crown is tilted because it is obtained through crooked means. The royal colours include black and white which indicate conflict. Royal blue, emerald green, and red are prevalent colours found in royal robes, crowns, and palaces. Red also represents the colour of blood which is a frequent motif in Macbeth. Gold symbolizes wealth and honour. One key image that is portrayed is a photo of a group of red poppies. The second image is a photo of a dagger floating in the sky, with dusky clouds in the background. Poppies illustrate images of sleep and death. The colour of red is also the colour of blood. The clouds indicate Macbeth’s dark wishes, and the floating dagger gives a representation of his deceptive thoughts. The poppies evoke images of Macbeth’s “black and deep desires” (1.4.58), which includes the thought of murdering Duncan. The clouds obscure the “light” (1.4.58) from seeing the horrible truth of Macbeth’s evil ambitions. These images describe the thought process of Macbeth, leading up to the murder of Duncan. Another key image is a photograph of me, hunched over by the weight of a heavy rock. The next image is a photo of two unclean hands, being washed with soap and water. The heaviness of the rock indicates the guilty conscience of Macbeth and the heavy burden that his act has left him with. The unclean hands also portray the washing away of guilt. All that is needed to erase this act is “a little water” (2.2.85) to purify their (Macbeth and Lady Macbeth) souls once again. Macbeth and his wife attempt to ease their feelings of wrong doing, however this soon backfires. The next image contains a linked chain being cut by scissors, and the second image shows half of my face covered with a spider web. A society which demonstrates honour and loyalty has order, like that of links to a chain. Like a pair of scissors; Macbeth’s treasonous act breaks this chain. On the surface Macbeth displays loyalty and appears to be an honourable man. The scissors serve to “cancel and tear to pieces” (3.2.54) the order and honour of society. “Light thickens” (3.2.55) like the spun web of deceit, masking his dishonor. Macbeth’s bad deeds are beginning to close in on him and things are getting worse. One bad turn causes a domino effect. Macbeth is at his happiest point when he displays honour and loyalty towards Duncan. His evil deed proceeds to gain momentum. Works Cited
Shakespeare, William, and Ken Roy. Macbeth. Toronto: Harcourt Canada, 2001. Print.
Harcourt Shakespeare.
Reference List

Song: Sleep Away by Bob Acri
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