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The invention of the

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Doug Booth

on 15 January 2014

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Transcript of The invention of the

The invention of the
Printing Press

movable metal type printing
The world's first movable type printing technology was invented and developed in China by the Han Chinese printer Bi Sheng between the years 1041 and 1048. In Korea, the movable metal type printing technique was invented in the early thirteenth century during the Goryeo Dynasty.
In Renaissance Europe
In Renaissance Europe, the arrival of mechanical movable type printing introduced the era of mass communication which permanently altered the structure of society. The relatively unrestricted circulation of information and (revolutionary) ideas transcended borders, captured the masses in the Reformation and threatened the power of political and religious authorities; the sharp increase in literacy broke the monopoly of the literate elite on education and learning and bolstered the emerging middle class.
Johannes Gutenberg
A single Renaissance printing press could produce 3,600 pages per workday,[5] compared to about 2,000 by typographic block-printing[6] and a few by hand-copying.[7] Books of bestselling authors such as Luther and Erasmus were sold by the hundreds of thousands in their lifetime.[8]
Printing Press
Across Europe
Johannes Gutenberg
In the West, the invention of an improved movable type mechanical printing technology in Europe is credited to the German printer Johannes Gutenberg in 1450.[3] The exact date of Gutenberg's press is debated based on existing screw presses.
Printing soon spread
Printing soon spread from Mainz, Germany to over two hundred cities in a dozen European countries.[9] However the first book in English was not until 25 years later in 1475. By 1500, printing presses in operation throughout Western Europe had already produced more than twenty million volumes.[
Johannes Gutenberg
Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed a printing system by both adapting existing technologies and making inventions of his own. His newly devised hand mould made possible the rapid creation of metal movable type in large quantities. The printing press displaced earlier methods of printing and led to the first assembly line-style mass production of books.[4
In the 16th century
In the 16th century, with presses spreading further afield, their output rose tenfold to an estimated 150 to 200 million copies.[9] The operation of a press became so synonymous with the enterprise of printing that, by metonymy, it lent its name to a new branch of media, the press.[10] The importance of printing as an emblem of modern achievement and of the ability of so-called Moderns to rival the Ancients, in whose teachings much of Renaissance learning was grounded, was enhanced by the frequent juxtaposition of the recent invention of printing to those of firearms and the nautical compass.[11] In 1620, the English philosopher Francis Bacon indeed wrote that these three inventions "changed the whole face and state of the world".[12]
Across Europe, the increasing cultural self-awareness of its people led to the rise of proto-nationalism, accelerated by the flowering of the European vernacular languages to the detriment of Latin's status as lingua franca.[13] In the 19th century, the replacement of the hand-operated Gutenberg-style press by steam-powered rotary presses allowed printing on an industrial scale,[14] while Western-style printing was adopted all over the world, becoming practically the sole medium for modern bulk printing.
Block printing first came to Christian Europe as a method for printing on cloth, where it was common by 1300. Images printed on cloth for religious purposes could be quite large and elaborate, and when paper became relatively easily available, around 1400, the medium transferred very quickly to small woodcut religious images and playing cards printed on paper. These prints were produced in very large numbers from about 1425 onward.
History
Around the mid-15th century, block-books, woodcut books with both text and images, usually carved in the same block, emerged as a cheaper alternative to manuscripts and books printed with movable type. These were all short heavily illustrated works, the bestsellers of the day, repeated in many different block-book versions: the Ars moriendi and the Biblia pauperum were the most common. There is still some controversy among scholars as to whether their introduction preceded or, the majority view, followed the introduction of movable type, with the range of estimated dates being between about 1440 and 1460.[15]
History
The End
Full transcript