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What is Datawise ?

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Gentre Adkins IV

on 31 January 2014

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Transcript of What is Datawise ?

DATAWISE
EDUC 532: Group Presentation
Bonnie Garcia, Mike Williams, Angelique Sims,
Bathsheba Brutus, Yohey Tokumitsu, Gentre Adkins IV


Phase 1: Prepare
Schools prepare for the work
by establishing a foundation for learning
from the student assessment results.
Phase 2: Inquiry
Schools then look for patterns in the data that indicate shortcomings in teaching and learning.
Phase 3: Act
Lastly, schools need to act on what they learn by designing and implementing instructional improvements.
1. Organizing for Collaborative Work
Build a Data Culture

Establish a Data Team
2. Building Assessment Literacy
Interpret Score Reports

Understand different types of assessment.
3. Creating a Data Overview
Team identifies a focus area for school improvement.

Analyze data searching for the story that the data tells.

Display data in charts
4. Digging into Student Data
5. Examining Instruction
6. Developing an Action Plan
7. Planning to Assess Progress
8. Acting and Assessing
Application: Problem of Practice
Final Thoughts
Reference List
What is Datawise ?
Step-by-step process in which educators can use to improve teaching and learning.
Decide on instructional strategy that will solve the problem of practice identified.

Work together to describe what the strategy will look like in classrooms.

Write the plan down including team members’ roles and responsibilities.
Before implementing the plan decide how you will measure the success.

Decide on the short, intermediate and long-term data that will be gathered and how it will be gathered.
4 guiding questions
Are we all on the same page?
Are we doing what we said we’d do?
Are our students learning more?
Where do we go from here?

Repeat the cycle of inquiry
FACULTY MEETING
All-In-One Classroom Assessment Plan (2013). Retrieved from
http://www.measuredprogress.org/datawise.

Boudette, K. P., City, E. A., & Murnane, R. J. (2006). The “data wise” improvement process.
Harvard Education Letter, 22(1), 1-3.

Datawise (2014). Retrieved from http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=datawise.

HarvardEducation. (2010, May 21). An introduction to data wise. Retrieved from

Steele, J. L. & Boudette, K. P. (2008). Leadership lessons from schools becoming “data wise.”
Harvard Education Letter, 24(1), 1-3.
Examine wide range of data, which includes student work, classroom observations, student surveys, benchmark assessments, etc.

Identify learner centered problems.
Examine instructional data
lesson plans
assignments
Examine self-reports
surveys
conversations with staff members
Classroom practice

Inform teachers about the importance of knowing what good teaching practices look like.

Conditions For Use
To facilitate improving teaching and learning
For systematic approach for teaching and learning
Gives specific guidance for school-wide goals

When should it be avoided
As a motivation tool
All-In-One Classroom Assessment Plan (2013). Retrieved from http://www.measuredprogress.org/datawise.

The All-In-One Classroom Assessment Platform helps improve the use of the Datawise process. It helps teams create and administer tests. Additionally, it helps customize reports for immediate feedback and design professional developments to help teachers learn how assessments and data can improve instruction. This platform also provides information relating to the common core.
Boudette, K. P., City, E. A., & Murnane, R. J. (2006). The “data wise” improvement process. Harvard Education Letter, 22(1), 1-3.

Organizing the work of instructional improvement around a process that has specific, manageable steps helps educators build confidence and skill in using data. A process that includes eight distinct steps can take school leaders to use their assessment data effectively, and organized these steps into three phases: Prepare, Inquire, and Act. The "Data Wise" Improvement Process shown in this article illustrates the cyclical nature of this work. Initially, schools "prepare" for the work by establishing a foundation for learning from student assessment results. Schools then "inquire"--look for patterns in the data that indicate shortcomings in teaching and learning--and subsequently "act" on what they learn by designing and implementing instructional improvements. Schools can then cycle back through inquiry and further action in a process of ongoing improvement. In this article, the authors outline the steps in what can be both a messy and ultimately satisfying undertaking. These steps are: (1) Organizing for Collaborative Work; (2) Building Assessment Literacy; (3) Preparing a Data Overview; (4) Digging into Student Data; (5) Examining Instruction; (6) Developing an Action Plan; (7) Planning to Assess Progress; and (8) Acting and Assessing. (Contains 4 resources.)
Datawise (2014). Retrieved from http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=datawise.

Datawise presents insight into the research and publication related to the process. It provides resources, a step-by-step explanation, enrollment opportunities, and a support team to better understand the Datawise process. In addition, there are two videos: one introduces the process and the other concentrates on the Ace Habits of Mind that contributes to the success of the process.
HarvardEducation. (2010, May 21). An introduction to data wise. Retrieved from

The introduction to Datawise provides a brief overview of the 8-step process. It highlights the needs for a productive data analysis application. The video includes an example of schools that utilize the process and testimonials on the successful impact it has had. The three phases and eight steps the process consist of are briefly defined to illustrate how the process works in action.
Steele, J. L. & Boudette, K. P. (2008). Leadership lessons from schools becoming “data wise.” Harvard Education Letter, 24(1), 1-3.

This article contains a description to meet the challenges of implementing each of the phases. The authors focus on strategies that school leaders can use to effectively use the Datawise process. During the Preparation phase, school leaders need to make the data germane to teachers and give the data teams the time needed to build skills for data collection and analysis. In the Inquiry phase, school leaders need to focus on creating clear protocols for analyzing data appropriately. They also need to engage in ongoing, focused dialogue with their teachers about student learning. Lastly, during the Act phase, school leaders focus on their action plan and helping teachers develop an appropriate model of continuous inquiry in teaching and learning.
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