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Stigmatization and people living with disabilities

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Janos Kollar

on 22 March 2018

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Transcript of Stigmatization and people living with disabilities

Stigmatization and people living with disabilities
Dr. János Kollár
assistant professor
Semmelweis University
Institute of Behavioral Sciences

Why people are proud of their surgery operation and why not with psy treatment?
STIGMA – what is it?
Ancient Greek World: morally undesirable persons (slaves, criminals) were marked with signals burnt or cut into the skin so that it was visible to everyone.

Later: wounds of Christ.

Today: conditions and characteristics of the body or behaviour
which produce
aversion
and
resistance

in the environment,
shame
,
frustration
and self-esteem disorders
in the individual concerned.

Examples
Homosexuality
Adoption
Undesired pregnancy
People living with disabilities
Types of Stigmas
(by Erving Goffmann, 1968)
Physical
(for eg. People living with physical disabilities)

Moral
Racial, national
Types of Stigmas
(by Mankoff, 1971)
Ascribed (for eg.: natural born blind)

Achieved
(for eg.: criminal)

Possible Causes and Process of Stigmatization
Chaos and order
Fear
Normality - abnormality

Stigma – tension - theories
Reactions to stigmatization
1) Escape (for eg. by plastic surgery)
2. Searching for positive meaning
(pl. Woody Allen)
3) Hiding
(BUT: the stigma can form a family secret – severe consequences.)

Emotional reactions
to stigmatization:
Shame
Agressivity
Pity
Inferiority complex
Accusation
Acceptance
Process of discrediting
Lack of contact (for eg.: eye-contact)
Emphasizing opposite opinions
Prejudices, etc.

Adaptation to stigmatizing diseases (Schneider and Conrad, 1981)
Balanced
Unbalanced
Pragmatic:
They minimize the significance of the disease for themselves and others. They give information about the disease only those persons who definitely need to know about it.

Secretive:
Their primary aim is no to tell their environment information which they think would contribute to their negative judgement, thus the aim of secretiveness is to maintain positive outer impressions.

Quasi-relieved:

Similarly to the pragmatic type they do not conceal the fact of their disease either, but they explicitly strive to let everybody know.
Unbalanced adaptation:

they stigmatised people are unable to cope with the negative effects caused by the disease. Extreme case: debilitated or inhibited person. („Main job” of the stigmatized person is being stigmatized.)
Doctor's task
Acceptance
Köszön
m
Quasi-relieved:
Similarly to the pragmatic type they do not conceal the fact of their disease either, but they explicitly strive to let everybody know.

They are unable to cope with the negative effects caused by the disease. Extreme case: debilitated or inhibited person. („Main job” of the stigmatized person is being stigmatized.)
- natural behavior
- providing priority
- involving the parents/caregivers
- involving the person living with disability
...and what about love and sex?
2) Searching for positive meaning
Full transcript