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Unit One: Book Thief

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Alan Psalidas

on 12 November 2016

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Transcript of Unit One: Book Thief

Day One
Color Explanation & Prologue Discussion
Take a moment and make certain that you have written why you used the colors that you have.

After 5 minutes, we are going to share why we used the colors that we did in order to analyze the prologue and the narrator of Death.

How did Zusak use the Prologue to set the theme, tone, and background of the book just by using three colors?
Review Day: GrudgeCorn
Rules:
Teams of 4-5
Each team gets 10 X's
Each team will be asked a review question:
If they get it right, they can erase 2 X's
2 from one group
1 from two groups
When you lose all of your X's, then your team is out.
The only way your team can get back in is by answering a question right, and making a toss in the cornhole board
If no team can answer a question, each team will receive two X's, even those who had been eliminated.
GRUDGE Rules:
If a team gets an answer right, they have the option to toss a beanbag at the cornhole board. If the student gets the bag on the board, the team gets to erase 1 additional X. (3 total)

If they manage to get the beanbag into the hole, the team gets to erase 2 additional X's (4 total)

HOWEVER:
If a team chooses to get additional X's through the Grudge option, the team's being targeted have an option to block their X removal. They must make a bean toss and have it AT LEAST land on the board

Additionally. If the team trying to block manages to get the bag into the hole during the block toss, then the team trying to attack them loses the amount of X's that were to be inflicted on them are erased from the team who initiated the GRUDGE round.
The Book Thief
By: Markus Zusak
Museum Walk: 10 points
This task requires:
No talking.
Your Chromebook

Procedure:
While the music is playing (roughly 9 minutes) walk around the room and look at each of the eleven pictures that are hanging on the wall.
When you have found the one that you feel is the most powerful, sit underneath it.
Then get on the question of the day labeled "Museum Walk" and respond to these questions:
Why was this image the most powerful in your opinion? (4 sentences)
Think about the overall tone/mood of the time period. Which character do you feel best describes you in these situations, or would be most influential to you if you were living Liesel's life? (5 sentences and 1 example. Page # not required.) KEEP YOUR BOOK CLOSED, PLEASE!!
Day Two
Day Three
Day Four
Anti-Bullying Lesson
Part One: Safe Place
Part Two: Form-A-Group (10 minutes)
Part Three: Assumptions (15 minutes)
Part Four: Small Group (10 minutes)
Part Five: Whole Group (15 minutes)


How can we connect this to anything that we have talked about or read?
Symbolism/ Imagery
Characterization
Questions/ Concerns, Etc.
Agenda
Museum Walk
Symbolism
Characterization
Imagery
Questions
Agenda:
Digital Citizenship
Imagery/Diction Lesson
Timeline
In Class Reading Time (If possible)
Society People Need In
Agenda
Google Assessment
Quick Talk
Writing Prompt
Detail/ Syntax
Day Five
Day Six
Day Seven
Agenda:

Take the Acuity Test.


Once finished, please
take the Voice Quiz that
is on Google Classroom.

If you complete both, please continue reading silently so others can have time to finish.
Professional Development Day

Agenda:
Writing Prompt
Inside Out
Exit Ticket

Teams with all of their responses (writing prompt and exit ticket) in will get an extra 25 points.

Any misbehaving is -10 for every infraction that the sub notes.
Day Eight
Day Ten
Day Eleven
Day Nine
Day Twelve
Day Thirteen
Day Twenty
Day Fifteen
Day Seventeen
Day Eighteen
Day Fourteen
TEST!!!!!!
List of Characters

Rosa
Hans
Rudy
Liesel's Brother
Liesel's Mother
Sister Maria
Pfiffikus
Frau Diller
Frau Holtzapfel

Liesel
Doesn't know father
Getting given up by her mother
Brother dying
Illiterate

Match the Characters with their Traits, then, when you are finished, transfer them onto your character sheet.
What do you need to create imagery?

Go over the Symbolism at the pages listed on the board.

With a partner, skim through Part One and highlight examples of imagery.

As a class, let's talk about our examples.
English 9 Unit 1 Syllabus
Course Essential Questions:
How does the Individual negotiate with Society?
What role does language play in that negotiation?

Unit Essential Questions:
What is a society?
Can an individual live life free of societal influence?
How do societies influence individuals?
Is society inherently good or evil?

List of terms you need to know:
Voice:
including diction, detail, imagery, syntax, tone and mood

Irony
Perspective
Flashback and flashforward
Point of view: the different types
Theme
Allusion
Simile/metaphor
Foreshadowing
Symbolism
Infer/imply
Ethos, pathos, logos
Irony/Personification
Digital Citizenship Lesson
Imagery/ Diction
Character Development/ Other Important Facts
Imagery uses what?

1. I could hear the popping and crackling as mom dropped the bacon into the frying pan, and soon the salty, greasy smell wafted toward me.

2. Glittering white, the blanket of snow covered everything in sight.

3. The golden yellow sunlight filtered down through the pale new leaves on the oak trees, coming to rest on Jessica's brown toes that were splayed in the red Georgia mud.

Examples you have found.
Diction refers to
Word Selection

As a class, let's make a list of Forbidden Words

Get with your row and write three simple sentences using those forbidden words.

As a class, we will take one sentence from a few groups and draw an image based on the sentence to see the difference. Then, we will work to make the sentence more effective.


Talk about the character of Liesel. Where did she start? Has she changed? If yes, how has she changed.

Have any other characters changed? How?

Any other symbolism/ important events?

Hans's "mistake" pg 104 & 118

Hans & Liesel

How does Death feel about mankind?

Rosa's Punishment page 99

Second book stolen & the person that caught her
Syntax/Detail
http://money.cnn.com/2016/09/12/media/charlie-hebdo-amatrice-defamation/index.html
Quick Talk/ Link to Current Events
What is satire?
When is it too much?
When do anti-extremists become what they are against?
How is this like the Nazis?
Do we think this can cause yet one more backslide into a bad time for society?
IMC Orientation
Google Assessment
Link is posted on Classroom

Answer the 3 questions and then turn it in.

This should take no longer than 5 minutes
Detail
Syntax
Many really good blues guitarists have all had the last name King. They have been named Freddie King and Albert King and B.B. King. The name King must make a bluesman a really good bluesman. The bluesmen named King have all been very talented and good guitar players. The claim that a name can make a guitarist good may not be that far-fetched.

What makes a good bluesman? Maybe, just maybe, it's all in a stately name. B.B. King. Freddie King. Albert King. It's no coincidence that they're the royalty of their genre. When their fingers dance like court jesters, their guitars gleam like scepters, and their voices bellow like regal trumpets, they seem almost like nobility. Hearing their music is like walking into the throne room. They really are kings.
The
emerald

Shi-Tzu

defecated
a pile the size of Texas
. After the smell slithered its way through the house, slamming me in the face with its putrid odor, I dashed down the steps and looked around the living room. The beige walled space contained only a couch, a coffee table, and the tv stand, but a recent addition had been added near the front door. It glistened in the sunlight streaming in through the recently washed windows. I wanted to puke. I hollered at Miffy, searching for the culprit of this heinous act. When I found her, she was cowering in a corner. Her little body shaking. I picked her up to punish her, but then realized how terrified she must be. I held her to my stomach and gave her a hug. Her body relaxed. A warm sensation ran down my front. I had made the poor dog pee herself.
Mrs. Doubtfire
Original
Revised
Walking Dead
Frozen
Lexile Testing
Tone/Voice
How do these movies use diction? Syntax? Imagery? Detail?

What kind of tone/mood do these videos give us?

How do they differ from the originals?

What makes them different?
Bronx
Lila
Athena
Flashback/Forward
Foreshadowing
Flashback:
A scene in a movie, novel, etc., set in a time
earlier
than the main story.

Flashforward
: A scene in a movie, novel, etc., set in a time
later
than the main story.
ex. Prologue.
Foreshadow
: to give a suggestion of (something that has not yet happened).
ex. Himmel Street
Flashback
Foreshadowing
Flash Forward & Flashback
Gallery Walk with a partner

Group Discussion about quotes

Stoplight Sticky Note

Outline For Standover Man
In Class
Writing

Part 4 Due
Part 6 Due
Part 9 Due
Part 10 & Epilogue Due
Agenda:
Partner Definitions
Dictionary Definitions
Video Clips
Gallery Walk
Group Discussion
Stoplight Sticky Note
Entry Task
On a note card, write:

3 things you like about the book

2 things you dislike about the book

1 thing you don't understand

Also, grab a purple characterization sheet.
Standover Man
Who & What is the Standover man?

Why is the main character in the book a bird?

Why did Max write this?

What does it mean that this was written over the pages of
Mein Kampf
?


On the back of your note card,
I want you to think about someone that you would consider to be
YOUR
Standover man. Write down their name, and three reasons why on the note card and then turn it in.
Irony:

: the use of words that mean the opposite of what you really think especially in order to be funny
: a situation that is strange or funny because things happen in a way that seems to be the opposite of what you expected
: a person who has a lot of a particular quality and who is the perfect example of someone who has that quality
: an imaginary person that represents a thing or idea
: the practice of representing a thing or idea as a person in art, literature, etc.
Personification:
Types of Irony
Dramatic:
irony that is inherent in speeches or a situation of a drama and is understood by the audience but not grasped by the characters in the play.



Situational:
irony involving a situation in which actions have an effect that is opposite from what was intended, so that the outcome is contrary to what was expected.


Verbal:
irony in which a person says or writes one thing and means another, or uses words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of the literal meaning.
Agenda:
Entry Task
Types of Irony
Standover Man
Jeopardy
Standover Man Writing Project
Entry Task
Please take a whiteboard for your row and a dry erase marker and, in your row, come up with definitions for foreshadowing, flash-forward, and flashback.
90 minutes:

30 minutes outline
5 minutes to make the book
10 minutes to write
30 min for illustration


Deskiles & Markerphors
Entry Task:
Come up with a bunch of slang words (that are school appropriate) that get used in everyday conversation and write them on the dry erase boards.

After that, you will have 20 minutes to finish the Standover Man Project from last class.
Definition of Connotation and Denotation
Denotation & Connotation
Definition of Simile & Metaphor
Connotation:

An idea or feeling that a word invokes in addition to its literal or primary meaning.
Denotation:

The literal or primary meaning of a word, in contrast to the feelings or ideas that the word suggests.
Simile:

a figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another thing of a different kind, used to make a description more emphatic or vivid.
USES "LIKE" OR "AS"
Metaphor:

a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable.
Does NOT use "like" or "as."
Slang Words Decoded

Discipline, Liberty, Exhausted

List:
Aggressive,
Assertive,
Domineering,
Dynamic,
Pushy,
Forceful
In the corner of your desk, write a noun or an adjective

When I call out "Simile" or "Metaphor," you will move the desks around to create a simile or metaphor for the class.

You must move the desks every turn.

Find examples of similes and metaphors in the book and discuss how Zusak uses this in order to help the reader see things, visualize components of the story, give it emotion and depth.

sky like boiling soup is a simile

imagery of this simile
Identify the feelings that Max has for Liesel when he is making the book.

How does this allow us to look at Max differently?
What is the power of words for Liesel?
The power of literacy?
How can we connect this to our Class Theory of individualism v. society?
Finalize Standover Man
(Connotation because these words are NOT defined this way.)
Stoplight Sticky Note
Red: I Don't Understand


Yellow: I'm Not Sure of Something (write the question on the note)


Green: I Got It!
Perspective
Han's Jr. vs. Hans
Death's perspective on humans
Liesel's unique perspective
Fill out the perspective column on the graphic organizer for ONE book and write a reasoning for it (2 sentences)
Point of View
Round the Room Sticky Notes
1st group: Read summary, look over Sparknotes, write down
key events
, come up with 3 discussion questions. (10 min)

2nd group: Read classmates summary, answer the discussion questions, come up with 2 new discussion questions, find a piece of
flash forward, flashback, foreshadowing
. (10 min)

3rd group. Read summary, answer discussion questions, discuss how the
flashback/flash forward/ foreshadowing
impacts the story and why Zusak would put that in his novel. (5 min)

4th group: Read summary, answer discussion questions, find 2
Simile, Metaphor, or Personification. (10)

5th group: Read summary, answer discussion questions, look at the similes/metaphors, find out which objects are being compared, write out the
denotation
(using a dictionary) (5 min)

6th group: Read summary, answer discussion questions, look at the phrases from the previous group and the denotations to write the
connotations
of the words/phrase. (5 min)

7th group: Read summary, answer discussion questions, look at the connotations from before to talk about the
tone/mood
of the piece/narrator. (5 min)

8th group: Read summary, answer discussion questions, look at the tone of the book and see how it has helped create the
voice
of the author and supporting it with 1 piece of evidence from the book. (5 min)

9th group: Read summary, answer discussion questions, look at all of the information provided and start to put together a
theme
for the book. Why did Zusak write this book, especially if he has a narrator like Death that “spoils” the ending. (10 min)

10th group: will review all of the information from the stickies (including answering and analyzing all of the discussion questions, look at the
theme
provided by the last group, and change it in order to solidify it to share with the rest of the class. (5 min)

Debriefing the Stickies
Break it down part by part and see if our conclusions have lead us to a similar theme. If not, how can we work in order to create a theme for the book. Finally, how can we compare this theme to our essential questions/Class Theory about individualism and society? Once these are covered, we can open up the floor to have a discussion about other components of the book, such as: plot, the character of Death, Death’s take on humanity, whether or not Zusak is going to rip all of our hearts out in the end by killing off our favorite characters.
Exit Card
3-2-1 Notecard

3 Things you learned today
2 Things you didn’t get to say that you agreed or disagreed with.
1 Thing you are still confused about

Quiz
You may use your notes.
1. Denotation is...?
2. Connotation is...?
3. The technique used to stop the plot in order to give additional background information is...?
4. What is the difference between Flash Forward and Foreshadowing?
5. The movie
Cars
and
Toy Story
are all examples of...?
6. The fact that Ilsa Hermann didn't turn Liesel in, but rather invited her into her own, private library is example of...?
The 3 similes/metaphors you were supposed to do for homework are extra credit.
1st Person Narration
Usually the protagonist or central character in the story
He or she is directly involved in story and is telling the tale “first hand.”
Readers should watch for the narrator’s use of first-person pronouns-
“I, me, my, our, us, we, myself, and ourselves,”

3rd Person Objective:
The narrator tells a third-person’s story (he, she, him, her),
The narrator only describes characters’ behavior and dialogue.
The narrator does not reveal any character’s thoughts or feelings.
Readers will be able to understand (imply) characters’ thoughts and motivations based on characters’ actions and dialogue,

3rd Person Limited:
Limited to the internal workings of one character.
The narrator tells a third-person’s story (he, she, him, her)

3rd Person Omniscient:
The narration will reveal more than one characters’ internal workings.
The narrator tells a third-person’s story (he, she, him, her)
Perspective is the character through whose eyes we see the story.
What is the difference between POV and Perspective?
Twilight:
POV: 1st person
Perspective: Bella
Divergent Series:
POV: First person
Perspective: Tris
The content in the back of the book
How can we see this in quotes?
Why would he choose this new POV
Fairytale Retell
Harry Potter Series:
POV: 3rd person limited
Perspective: Harry Potter & others
Homework: Find 3 examples of Simile/Metaphor in the book
Entry Task:
With a partner, study for the quiz. You have until 5 minutes after the bell rings.
Book Hunt
Examples:
POV is HOW the story is told.
Perspective is WHO is telling the story.
Connection to the Book
In the Classroom Library, go through and pick three different books for your pair. In your graphic organizer, you will fill in the books title, author, point of view, and three examples that helped determine that point of view.
Book Connection
Using our new knowledge about POV and Perspective, what better way is there to show that we know what is going on by taking a fairytale and rewriting it from a different perspective and point of view. Each group will have at least five members in it in order to work on this project.

Hansel & Gretel (1st person)
Cinderella (3rd person limited)
Little Red Riding Hood (3rd person objective)
Goldilocks (3rd person omniscient)
Jack and the Beanstalk (1st person)

First, identify key events in the story.

Second, Decide which new character you would like to tell the story from, and then begin to think about how the events would happen if they were telling the story.

Third, using the POV listed above, reconstruct the story in the new POV and perspective.
Closure
Share your stories with the class.
Explain your decisions and how you went about writing the specific POV.
Review/Preview.
Allusion
Literary and Philosophical References
Mein Kampf

Historical References
Adolf Hitler, also referred to as the Führer (throughout)
Jessie Owens
The 1936 Olympics
Joseph Goebbels
Joseph Stalin
Infer/Imply
Infer:
deduce or conclude (information) from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements.
Listener
Finding the Bad Guy

Imply:
strongly suggest the truth or existence of (something not expressly stated)
Speaker
Evidence
a passing or casual reference; an incidental mention of something, either directly or by implication
Entry Task
Spend 20-30 minutes working on writing the scene from the book in the Perspective that you have chosen.
Crime Shows
What makes them similar?

What do the shows do/ what is the characters end goal?

How do they get there?

Can they get to the bottom of things
without
any evidence?
Hans's relationship with his kids.

Max's survival

Basements

Power of words
Murder Mystery
Book Connection
With a partner, take your worksheet and begin searching the room for clues. Record these clues and the potential suspects on your worksheet, gathering as much intel as you possibly can on the events that took place. Once you and your partner have found all of the clues and feel as if you can pinpoint a murderer, on the back of your evidence logging worksheet, write a paragraph, (at least 7 sentences) explaining IN DETAIL what happened and who killed him.
Book Examples
Music Hunt
Dig through the music on your phone or find your favorite songs on Youtube and try to find one song that contains an allusion in it. When you have, on the bottom of your investigative report, write the song, the artist, and the reference.
Examples:
Taylor Swift
"Love Story"
Reference: Romeo & Juliet
"You were Romeo. You were throwing pebbles."
One Direction
"One Thing"
Reference: Kryptonite (Superman)
"Shot out of the sky. You're my Kryptonite..."
Perspective
Han's Jr. vs. Hans
Death's perspective on humans
Liesel's unique perspective
Fill out the perspective column on the graphic organizer for ONE book and write a reasoning for it (2 sentences)
Perspective is the character through whose eyes we see the story.
What is the difference between POV and Perspective?
Twilight:
POV: 1st person
Perspective: Bella
Divergent Series:
POV: First person
Perspective: Tris
Harry Potter Series:
POV: 3rd person limited
Perspective: Harry Potter & others
Examples:
POV is HOW the story is told.
Perspective is WHO is telling the story.
Book Connection
Book Thief Retell
Using our new knowledge about POV and Perspective, we are going to look at 3 scenes from the book and rewrite them using a different Perspective and POV. Each group will have four members in it in order to work on this project.

First, identify key events in the scene.

Second, Decide which new character you would like to tell the story from and which point of view, and then begin to think about how the events would happen if they were telling the story.

Third, using the POV listed above, reconstruct the story in the new POV and perspective.
Metaphor Review
Her mouth was a circle

“All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.” –William Shakespeare

Love is an ocean

Life is a struggle

Eyes were saucers
Simile/Metaphor worsheet. Convert Similes into Metaphors and Metaphors into Similes.
Car Chase: G1 & G3
Which one is true?
People are good but evil when influenced by others
People are always inherently evil
People are inherently good
People are neither good nor evil, but neutral
There are a lot of moments in this section of the book that really hit us right in the emotional soft spot. One of these moments is when Max sneaks upstairs during a potential air raid in order to look at the stars. On page 378, Zusak writes, "Max lifted his head with great sorrow and great astonishment. 'There were stars,' he said. 'They burned my eyes.'"

To respond to this, think about Zusak's
DICTION
usage with the words "sorrow" and "astonishment." Think of their
DENOTATION
and
CONNOTATION
and the
TONE/MOOD
this creates. Then, think about the
PERSPECTIVE
of Max.

To answer this prompt, make sure that you talk about all of the words written in all capital letters above in a paragraph before giving me a single sentence as to what you think the importance of this scene is. So your answer should be a paragraph with AT LEAST 5 sentences in it.

Example: Sentence one (diction usage). Sentence two (this is what the words mean, but this is the feeling the words give us). Sentence three (Because of these words, Zusak sets this Tone/Mood) Sentence four (taking this tone/mood and looking at the character of Max and his perspective, this is the emotions behind the scene and why Max said this). Sentence five (I think that this is important to the overall book because...).
Writing Prompt Part 7
What are these?
What are their purpose?
Why are we doing this?
Am I holding on to these?
How are they going to be implemented into class?
Can I customize it?
Are you going to read these?
Dates
Notebooks
Finish your
Book Thief
Retell.
Hans's relationship with his kids

Max's survival

Basements

Power of words
Book Connection
Allusion
a passing or casual reference; an incidental mention of something, either directly or by implication
Examples:
Taylor Swift
"Love Story"
Reference: Romeo & Juliet
"You were Romeo. You were throwing pebbles."
One Direction
"One Thing"
Reference: Kryptonite (Superman)
"Shot out of the sky. You're my Kryptonite..."
Literary and Philosophical References
Mein Kampf

Historical References
Adolf Hitler/ Führer
Jessie Owens
The 1936 Olympics
Joseph Goebbels
Joseph Stalin
Book Examples
Symbolism
Han's accordion
Han's jr. as stereotypical brainwashed German
Bird in the Standover man
Book burning on Hitler's birthday
Mein Kampf to the Nazi party
Mein Kampf to Liesel
Books in general to liesel
List 1:
1. a (not, without, from, away)
2. an (not, without)
3. ab (from, away)
4. abs (from, away)
5. acro (high)
6. ambi (both, around)
7. amb (both, around)
8. amphi (both)
9. ante (before)
10. anti (against)
11. ant (against)
12. be (on, away)
13. bene (well)
14. bon (well)
Vocabulary
List 2:
1. bi (both, double, twice)
2. bis (both, double, twice)
3. bin (both, double, twice)
4. by (side, close, near)
5. cata (down, against)
6. cerebro (brain)
7. circum (around)
8. circ (around)
9. co (together, with)
10. con (together, with)
11. col (together, with)
12. com (together, with)
13. coni (dust)
14. contra (against)
15. counter (against)
Prefixes are word parts that come before the root words (pre = before). Depending upon its meaning, a prefix changes the intent or sense of the base word.
Entry Task:
In pairs on the dry erase board, think about symbols and what they represent. Find three symbols from the room and give me what they mean. For instance: The Flag represents freedom, liberty, and happiness
Definition:
the use of symbols to represent ideas or qualities.
Why would an author use them?
In groups, write down these symbols and what they mean on a sheet of paper..
Vocab Kahoot!
First Entry
:
Take a quality of a human being (such as Courage, Love, Sacrifice, Honor, Respect, Courtesy, or Love) and come up with your own symbol. After you draw the symbol, write 3 sentences as to why this new image represents this quality/characteristic
Vocabulary Quiz
Table Stickynote
Group of Four: On your sticky, come up with an idea as to how a paper should be formatted on the back side of the Stickynote
Using the articles I have printed out and passed out, we are going to go through the different components of a paper and the best ways to scaffold them.
Body Paragraphs
Come up with these first
Used to build thesis
Reasons to back up you claim
Citations


Find Topic Sentences
Find evidence
Fill out an outline on your Stickynote
Introduction
Use the topic sentences from the body paragraphs to build a thesis.
Hook
Make claims precise and specific
Restate Thesis and supporting evidence
Wrap up all ideas
Connect to the real world
Conclusion
Day Nineteen
Infer:
deduce or conclude (information) from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements.
Listener
Finding the Bad Guy

Imply:
strongly suggest the truth or existence of (something not expressly stated)
Speaker
Evidence
Notebooks
Everybody has a story.
What is something you dislike about yourself?
What can you do to fix that?
Other Writing Prompt
Paper Writing
Theme
Discussion Question
Rules for today's activity
Writing Prompt
If you could change one thing about the world, what would it be? Why would you make this change?
Rules for the Day
Last day for late assignments is next class
Full transcript