Prezi

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in the manual

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Gun Control

No description
by Alax Pruitt on 5 December 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Gun Control

Gun Control The Second Amendment: A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. The United States of America has always been a firm believer in the right to bear arms. Our nation began when we took up arms against the British, and fought for our own Freedom. Now gun lobbyists and other anti-gun associations are putting pressure on our second amendment rights. I will explain to you how gun control is not effective, the benefits of firearms, and how you can protect your second amendment rights. Gun Control Proves ineffective Benefits of Firearms Protecting our Second
Amendment Rights - If gun-control laws worked, these weapons would not exist. Conclusions should not be based on studies but hard results of crime reports. Comparing the FBI crime figures show states that have restrictive gun control continually have higher crime rates. -Concealed carry laws have reduced crime and murder in states that have enforced them. -Washington, D.C. has, perhaps, the most restrictive gun control laws in the country, and yet it is frequently the Murder Capital of the nation -Orlando, FL. In 1966-67, the media highly publicized a safety course which taught Orlando women how to use guns. The result: Orlando’s rape rate dropped 88% in 1967, whereas the rape rate remained constant in the rest of Florida and the nation 1791: Second
Amendment
is Ratified 1871: NRA
Is Founded 1822: Bliss v. Commonwealth Brings ‘Individual Right’ Into Question 1856: Dred Scott v. Sandford Upholds Individual Right 1934: National Firearms Act Brings About First Major Gun Control 1938: Federal Firearms Act Requires License for Dealers 1968: Gun Control Act Ushers In New Regulations 1994: Brady Act and Assault Weapons Ban 2004: Assault Weapons Ban Sunsets 2008: D.C. v. Heller is a Major Setback for Gun Control 2010: Gun Owners Score Another Victory in McDonald v. Chicago A select committee assembled to review amendments proposed by James Madison authored the language that would become the Second Amendment to the Bill of Rights: “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” The National Rifle Association was founded by a pair of Union soldiers in 1871, as an effort to promote the shooting of rifles. The Second Amendment’s intent for individual Americans first came into question in 1822, in Bliss v. Commonwealth. The court case arose in Kentucky after a man was indicted for carrying a sword concealed in a cane. He was convicted and fined $100. The Second Amendment as an individual right was affirmed by the Supreme Court of the United States in its decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford in 1856. With the rights of slaves in question, the nation’s highest court opined on the intent of the Second Amendment for the first time, writing that affording slaves full rights of American citizenship would include the right “to keep and carry arms wherever they went.” The National Rifle Association was founded by a pair of Union soldiers in 1871, shooting of rifles. However, the organization would grow to become the face of America's pro-gun lobby in the 20th Century The National Firearms Act targeted fully-automatic weapons, short-barreled shotguns and rifles, pen and cane guns, and other firearms defined as “gangster weapons.” The Federal Firearms Act of 1938 required anyone selling or shipping firearms to be licensed through the U.S. Department of Commerce. The Federal Firearms License (FFL) stipulated that guns could not be sold to persons convicted of certain crimes and required sellers to log the names and addresses of anyone they sold guns to. Thirty years after America’s first sweeping reform of gun laws, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy helped to usher in new federal legislation with wide-ranging implications. The Gun Control Act of 1968 prohibited mail order sales of rifles and shotguns, increased license requirements for sellers and broadened the list of persons prohibited from owning a firearm to include convicted felons, drug users and the mentally incompetent. The first, the Brady Handgun Violence Protection Act, required a five-day waiting period and background check for the sale of handguns, while also requiring a National Instant Criminal Background Check System to be created. The second, the Assault Weapons Ban (officially entitled the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act) banned a number of rifles defined as “assault weapons,” including many semi-automatic, military-style rifles such as the AK-47 and SKS. A Republican-controlled Congress refused to pass a reauthorization of the Assault Weapons Ban in 2004, allowing the ban to expire. President George W. Bush was criticized by gun control supporters for not actively pressuring Congress to renew the ban, while gun rights supporters criticized him for indicating that he would sign a reauthorization if Congress passed it. Gun rights proponents were thrilled in 2008 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in District of Columbia v. Heller that the Second Amendment extends gun ownership rights to individuals. The decision affirmed an earlier decision by a lower appeals court and struck down handgun bans in Washington D.C. as unconstitutional. Gun rights supporters scored their second major Supreme Court victory in 2010, when the high court affirmed the individual right to own guns in McDonald v. Chicago.

The ruling, which was an inevitable follow-up to D.C. v. Heller, marked the first time that the Supreme Court ruled the provisions of the Second Amendment extend to the states. The ruling overturned an earlier decision by a lower court in a legal challenge to Chicago’s ordinance banning the possession of handguns by its citizens.
The right to bear arms is a political right designed to safeguard freedom so that no government can take away from you the rights which God has given you.
– Newt Gingrich,
See the full transcript