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Rachael Hayllor - EDX 3270 Assignment

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by Rachael Hayllor on 1 April 2013

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Transcript of Rachael Hayllor - EDX 3270 Assignment

Rachael Hayllor EDX 3270 - Assignment one Annotations Continued.. Overview/Synthesis Annotation Seven Annotation Five Annotation Six Annotation Four Annotation One Annotation Three Annotation Two Annotations... Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy (4th Ed). Melbourne: Oxford University Press. Cumming-Potvin, W. (2007). Scaffolding, Multiliteracies and reading circles, Canadian Journal of Education, 30, 4, 83-507. Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and Learning Multiliteracies: Changing times changing literacies. (pp. 19-55). Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Campbell, R., & Green, D. (2006). Literacies and Learners Current Perspectives (3rd Ed). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia. Kitson, L., Fletcher, M., & Kearney, J. (2007). Continuity and change in literacy practices: A move towards multiliteracies. Journal of Classroom Interaction, 41.2 29-41. Jones, B., & Flannigan, S. (n.d). Connecting the Digital Dots: Literacy of the 21st Century. Retrieved from http://www.nmc.org/pdf/Connecting%20th%20Digital%20Dots.pdf O’Rourke, M. (2005). Multiliteracies for 21st Century schools. Snapshot, 2, 1-12. Cumming-Potvin, W. (2007). Scaffolding, Multiliteracies and reading circles, Canadian Journal of Education, 30, 4, 83-507. For a multiliteracy rich curriculum to occur educators must provide opportunities for students to explore, learn about and engage with literacy and literacy practices, (Anstey, M., & Bull, G. 2006). A pedagogy of multiliteracies overcomes the limitations of the traditional approaches of literacy education by negotiating the multiple linguistic and cultural differences in our society, (The New London Group, 1996). Literacy education must now include all increasing diversity of written and visual texts found in our multimodal diverse world. Educators need to rethink what needs to be taught to students in literacy to ensure is addresses this increasing diversity, (The New London Group, 1996). It was previously believed that if a student could read or write they could do so in all contexts, this however is not believed to the case anymore, (Santoro, N. 2004). Literacy is considered to not only be a single set of skills but rather as a way of operating within a variety of texts and social structures, (Santoro, N. 2004). Because of this the pedagogy of multiliteracies should be implemented within a classroom to best cater for students needs. Throughout the ‘Literacy’, (Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., & Holliday, M., 2010) textbook there is reference to ‘The New London Group’s Pedagogy of Multiliteracies’. Throughout the textbook it expands on what students in todays classrooms are expected to know and learn to be considered multiliterate. The concept of multiliteracies is evident through many chapters of the book. The authors make specific notion to the rapid changes of technology and how this is changing literacies for students within 21st Century classrooms. The authors make numerous references to ‘The New London Group’ to back their findings about multiliteracies within the classroom. This chapter titled ‘Defining Multiliteracies’ is chapter two from the textbook ‘Teaching and Learning Multiliteracies: Changing Times Changing Literacies’, (Anstey, M., & Bull, G, 2006). The authors of this chapter focus on discussing the skills that students need to be proficient in a 21st Century classroom since multiliteracies have been introduced. The authors go on to write how to; not only define what is considered multiliteracies but also where and how it originated. They also give examples as to what constitutes as multiliteracies within classrooms for teacher reference. They then go on to discuss the pedagogy of multiliteracies and how it is different to other pedagogies. The editors of this textbook, Anstey and Bull are both well-known literacy scholars. This textbook edited by Rod Campbell and David Green, was a course reading for a previous literacy course I completed. I believe much of the information is still relevant for this course. There is ample information within this book on the topic of multiliteracies. It focuses on how children are to make sense of the world they live in. For this to occur students must acquire certain skills, it is these skills, which are adapting and changing due to multiliteracies.This textbook provides a brief overview of multiliteracies the implications that it may create as well as strategies for overcoming these implications. This textbook provides a broad understanding that would be investigated deeper to gain a better understanding. This journal articles discuses the multiliteracies theoretical framework, what is it and how it is implemented. It goes on to study a classroom within a Queensland school where interactive whiteboards are present in all classrooms. It discusses the teacher’s hesitance to use technology and resistance to create a classroom where multiliteracies are common. It then discusses why teachers may have this apprehension towards a change in how the curriculum is taught. It states how this change is essential for students of the 21st Century to develop. This article discusses the difference in what it means to be literate in the 21st Century in comparison to centuries before it. It then discusses what are digital literacies and the thinking strategies that should be incorporated in to teaching students digital literacy. It discusses the need for teachers to be willing and able to embrace the change that is occurring or potentially jeopardise student’s achievements. The article itself used numerous articles as resources, which were both primary and secondary sources. It concluded that all the media sources that bombarded students on a day-to-day occurrence had their own unique learning advantages and teachers needed to get students ready for the technological savvy world they live within. This article written by Dr. Maureen O’Rourke discussed the importance of getting students ready for the world in which they live in. She stated the ‘challenge was for schools to decide how best to prepare their students for the technological, social, cultural and political changes they will face’, (O’Rourke, M. 2005)). There are numerous examples of how multiliteracies have been implemented within schools, throughout the article. She has visited many schools and has sat in and watched many lessons, both integrating multiliteracies and those who failed to do so. Dr Maureen O’Rourke is a Director of Global Features, who works with educational reform and innovation in Australia and internationally. Wendy Cumming-Potvin wrote this journal article from Murdoch University. Throughout the article she discusses the importance of scaffolding the integration and implementation of multiliteracies into any classroom situation. She makes reference to, the importance of teachers being aware and drawing on students out of school literacy experiences, to provide scaffolding in classroom pedagogy. She conducts a case study on a boy who may lack traditional literacies skills but is very competent with multiliteracies in particular computer technology. She discusses the ‘pedagogy of multiliteracies’ in further detail discussing each component in full. Annotation Eight Mills, K. (2008). The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Readers. Proceedings Stories Places, Spaces: Literacy and Identity, National conference by the Australian Literacy Educators’ Association and Australian Association for the Teaching of English, Adelaide, SA. This journal written by Kathy Mills, discusses the seven habits of highly effective reading. It also goes into detail about reading multimodal texts and how this requires different skills that need to be explicitly taught to students. She mentions that it is a teacher’s responsibility to find multimodal texts that encourage the development of multiliteracies. She then discusses reading comprehension and the difference multimodal texts can play. Throughout the article she provides the reader with many examples, such as analysis of texts using the five modes, (Mills, K. 2008). She also provides the reader with numerous resources to help students. Throughout the whole article she relates the seven habits of highly effective reading to multiliteracies and how it could be taught. Annotation Nine Unsworth, L. (2001). Teaching Multiliteracies across the curriculum. Retrieved from http://mcgraw-hill.co.uk/openup/chapters/0335206042.pdf This article by Len Unsworth discusses the previously believed notion that if students could read or write they could do so in all contexts. This is later mentioned to be a lot more challenging then previously believed as literacy is much more complex. It discusses the need to change the dimensions of school literacy. The extent to which literacy has now changed and the ways in which students are now needed to be literate are discussed. It also makes reference throughout the article to ‘The New London Groups Multiliteracies Pedagogy’. In relation to this it was said students needed to have a meta-language suited to multiliteracies to smoothly go by day-to-day. Annotation Ten The New London Group. (1996). A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: designing social features. Harvard Educational Review, 66 (1) 60-95. This article is by “The New London Group’. This group is responsible for the change towards teaching the multiliteracies pedagogy. This article discussed how ‘The New London Group’ came up with the pedagogy of multiliteracies, (The New London Group, 1996)It goes on to discuss why they believed it was necessary and how they believed it could be implemented within schools. They aimed to change the way in which literacy was taught to hopefully better equip students with skills they would need in the ‘real world’. Their aim was to see their framework adapted into schools to allow students to become not only literate but also multiliterate in a globalised rapidly moving world. The term ‘pedagogy of multiliteracies’ was created by ‘The New London Group’ in 1996 to define the new set of skills students need to be considered literate in a 21st century classroom, (The New London Group, 1996). The New London Group decided after extensive research that literacy education needs to be much more than the traditional reading and writing of the national language, (Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. 2009). Rather it needs to include the ever-diverging languages occurring due to the technological advances in the globalised world, (Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. 2009). The New London Group created the pedagogy of multiliteracies, which they believed should equip students with necessary skills to develop strategies for reading the new and unfamiliar texts, (Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. 2009). By students engaging in a pedagogy of multiliteracies it allows them to engage in more powerful learning in a world where diversity is critical, (Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. 2009’). Educators need to rethink what needs to be taught to students in literacy to ensure it addresses this increasing diversity, (The New London Group, 1996). It was previously believed that if a student could read or write they could do so in all contexts, this however is not believed to the case anymore, (Santoro, N. 2004). Literacy is considered to not only be a single set of skills but rather as a way of operating within a variety of texts and social structures, (Santoro, N. 2004). Because of this the pedagogy of multiliteracies should be implemented within a classroom to best cater for students needs. Educators in this globalised world need to ensure students understand how the resources of language, image and digital rhetoric’s can be displayed to construct different types of meanings, (Unsworth, L. 2001). Mills (2008) states educators should seek out multimodal activities that provide opportunities for students to develop skills in multiliteracies. This is important because there is a key difference between multimodal and pencil and paper-based reading comprehension, (Mills, K. 2008).

As an educator is important to be aware and draw on student’s out-of-school literacy experiences to provide a basis for authentic scaffolding, (Cumming-Potvin, W. 2007). It is increasingly important that students are encouraged to question and respond critically to be an effective literacy participant in the 21st Century, (Cumming-Potvin, W. 2007). It is more evident now than ever that we are growing up in a digitally connected media-rich world and students would be disadvantaged if educators did not embrace a multiliteracies pedagogy, (O’Rourke, M. 2005). The New London Multiliteracies Pedagogy combines these diverse modes of communication and meaning making with the diverse practises of individuals, families, communities, workplace and the broader global society, (O’Rourke, M. 2005). Digital literacy is also becoming commonplace in educational settings, this means the ability to understand and use information in multiple formats from a wide range of sources, (Jones, B., & Flannigan, S. n.d.).

For a student to be considered multiliterate they need to be able to get meaning from any text regardless of technology, media form or structure, (lit text). Students today not only need to master traditional literacies but also what technology has provided, (Winch, et.al, 2010). As an educator the responsibility is to equip students for this, (Anstey, M., & Bull, G. 2006) This is essential for students of the 21st Century, (Kitson, L,. Fletcher, M., & Kearney, J. 2007). ICT Reflection References Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and Learning Multiliteracies: Changing times changing literacies. (pp. 19-55). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and learning multiliteracies: changing times, changing literacies (pp. 56-81). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). Multiliteracies : new literacies new learning, Pedagogies : an International Journal, 4 (3), 164-195.

Campbell, R., & Green, D. (2006). Literacies and Learners Current Perspectives (3rd Ed). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia.

Cumming-Potvin, W. (2007). Scaffolding, Multiliteracies and reading circles, Canadian Journal of Education, 30, 4, 83-507. Jones, B., & Flannigan, S. (n.d). Connecting the Digital Dots: Literacy of the 21st Century. Retrieved from http://www.nmc.org/pdf/Connecting%20th%20Digital%20Dots.pdf

Kitson, L., Fletcher, M., & Kearney, J. (2007). Continuity and change in literacy practices: A move towards multiliteracies. Journal of Classroom Interaction, 41.2 29-41.

Mills, K. (2008). The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Readers. Proceedings Stories Places, Spaces: Literacy and Identity, National conference by the Australian Literacy Educators’ Association and Australian Association for the Teaching of English, Adelaide, SA.

O’Rourke, M. (2005). Multiliteracies for 21st Century schools. Snapshot, 2, 1-12. Santoro, N. (2004). Using the four resources model across the curriculum. In A. Healy, & E. Honan (Eds.), Text next : new resources for literacy learning (pp. 51-67). Newtown, NSW: Primary English Teaching Association.

The New London Group. (1996). A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: designing social features. Harvard Educational Review, 66 (1) 60-95.

Unsworth, L. (2001). Teaching Multiliteracies across the curriculum. Retrieved from http://mcgraw-hill.co.uk/openup/chapters/0335206042.pdf

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy (4th Ed). Melbourne: Oxford University Press. When thinking about what program I would use to fulfil the multimodal presentation component of the assignment I considered programs I had heard of but had never used. This was because I wanted to learn about possible programs for when I’m teaching in my own classroom. I choose Prezi because I had been shown it before but I had never used it personally. I thought it would be a good program to use because it is a very visually appealing program that used the Internet. It was also something I could see myself using in the future. Due to never using Prezi before I had to learn everything about how to use it to create a presentation. Luckily there were numerous examples and tutorials available for assistance. Because of the notion of multiliteracies and the fact we are living in a globalised world it is essential that educators ensure this is reflected in literacy practices in education, (Campbell, R., & Green, 2006). Knowing this I knew it was important I found a program I could use in future classroom situations. I am very happy and impressed with my final presentation especially considering I’ve never used Prezi before. I found it a great program that was very adjustable to my needs and future needs. I will definitely be considering using Prezi in my future classrooms.
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