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TEACH LIKE A CHAMPION

Teacher techniques for the classroom
by Saundra Hart on 23 May 2013

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Transcript of TEACH LIKE A CHAMPION

Teach Like A Champion Don’t leave them hanging- explain everything
“why do we have to learn this” YOU “to prepare you for college”
Rule is broken- restate the rule- then explain the consequence to avoid the “but what did I do” EXPLIAN everything! #48 Explain Everything Be constant, don’t let your emotions get in the way
Be level headed
Replace “I’m disappointed in you” with “I expect better of you” #47 Emotional Constancy Once dealt with let it be in the past, clean slate move forward. DON’T hold grudges.
Put your arm around the student when telling them they need to re-do something or bend down to eye level to re-state a class rule. # 45 Warm/Strict Explain everything: don’t leave the student thinking “what did I do”

“your behavior is rude” rather than “you are rude. # 45 Warm/Strict Techniques # 45 – 49
Chapters 8 & 9 Teach Like a Champ! Getting answers wrong is a normal part of learning, don’t make a big deal of it.
Use praise, but don’t over do it- kids may be scared to get a question wrong if you use heavy praise for getting a problem right.
Sprinkle in strong praise occasionally. You want to motivate your students. #49 Normalize Everything The Joy factor = finding joy in work!!
Play games
Make students feel included (use nicknames)
Use songs , drama, and dance to learn (have fun while learning)
Use humor
Routines are great, but throw in an occasional surprise (what's in the bag- inferencing) # 46 The J-factor Don’t leave them hanging- explain everything
“why do we have to learn this” YOU “to prepare you for college”
Rule is broken- restate the rule- then explain the consequence to avoid the “but what did I do” EXPLIAN everything! #48 explain everything Be constant, don’t let your emotions get in the way
Be level headed
Replace “I’m disappointed in you” with “I expect better of you” #47 emotional constancy The Joy factor = finding joy in work!!
Play games
Make students feel included (use nicknames)
Use songs , drama, and dance to learn (have fun while learning)
Use humor
Routines are great, but throw in an occasional surprise (what's in the bag- inferencing) # 46 the j-factor Once dealt with let it be in the past, clean slate move forward. DON’T hold grudges.
Put your arm around the student when telling them they need to re-do something or bend down to eye level to re-state a class rule. # 45 Warm/Strict Explain everything: don’t leave the student thinking “what did I do”

“your behavior is rude” rather than “you are rude. # 45 Warm/Strict Techniques # 45 – 49
Chapters 8 &9 Teach like a champ! Getting answers wrong is a normal part of learning, don’t make a big deal of it.
Use praise but don’t over do it- kids may be scared to get a question wrong if you use heavy praise for getting a problem right.
Sprinkle in strong praise occasionally. You want to motivate your students. #49Normalize everything Additional Techniques for Creating Positive Rhythm in the Classroom
Skill of creating the perception that you are moving quickly or change tempo from slow, to steady, to energetic speed
Six techniques for managing illusion of speed in classroom CHAPTER 8
improving your pacing Change the pace Put an agenda on the board for a lesson or the morning
Add a catchy name to some of the topics on your agenda
Referring to a lesson as: “We’re almost there.” Look forward Count the time down
Parcel it out in specific increments
Using countdowns
Allows continually set goals for your class’s speed in meeting expectations Work the clock Chapter 9
challenging students
t0 think critically Additional techniques for Questioning and Responding for Students will:
Guides students toward understanding when introducing material
To push students to do greater share of the thinking
To remediate an error
To stretch students
To check for understanding Chapter 9
challenging students
t0 think critically Helps focus students on developing one idea at a time
Focuses on questioning with a specific goal or purpose in mind One at a time Helps focus students on developing one idea at a time
Focuses on questioning with a specific goal or purpose in mind One at a time Effective questions engage students thinking about a topic in contained and concrete ways
Then push them to think more deeply and broadly to answer broader and deeper questions more factually, more insightfully, and having willing to take greater risks. Simple to complex Ask the same question verbatim
Don’t pull a Bait-and-Switch on students by changing the question after the student has raised hand
If questions matter, student need to hear them, consider them, and participate based on thoughtful reflection Verbatim (No bait and switch) Start with a question word
Limits to two clauses
Write them in advance when they matter
Ask an actual question
Assume the answer Clear and concise Start with a question word
Limits to two clauses
Write them in advance when they matter
Ask an actual question
Assume the answer Clear and concise Start with a question word
Limits to two clauses
Write them in advance when they matter
Ask an actual question
Assume the answer Clear and concise Questioning based on theme and variation
Similar sequences of questions applied over and over in different settings Stock questions Questioning based on theme and variation
Similar sequences of questions applied over and over in different settings Stock questions Start with a question word
Limits to two clauses
Write them in advance when they matter
Ask an actual question
Assume the answer Clear and concise Ask the same question verbatim
Don’t pull a Bait-and-Switch on students by changing the question after the student has raised hand
If questions matter, student need to hear them, consider them, and participate based on thoughtful reflection Verbatim (No bait and switch) Effective questions engage students thinking about a topic in contained and concrete ways
Then push them to think more deeply and broadly to answer broader and deeper questions more factually, more insightfully, and having willing to take greater risks. Simple to complex Helps focus students on developing one idea at a time
Focus on questioning with a specific goal or purpose in mind One at a time Additional techniques for Questioning and Responding for Students will:
Guides students toward understanding when introducing material
To push students to do greater share of the thinking
To remediate an error
To stretch students
To check for understanding Chapter 9
challenging students
t0 think critically Count the time down
Parcel it out in specific increments
Using countdowns
Allows continually set goals for your class’s speed in meeting expectations Work the clock Put an agenda on the board for a lesson or the morning
Add a catchy name to some of the topics on your agenda
Referring to a lesson as: “We’re almost there.” Look forward Keeping short learning activities ready when a two minute opportunity emerges: at the end of class, in the hallway, while waiting for buses, a walk to the bathroom
Reading out loud , reviewing the day’s lessons, mental math, etc. Every minute matters Creates illusion of speed by shifting rapidly involving a wide array of participants
Helps you react to and energize a lagging class quickly and simply
Maximize by using other skills and techniques – Cold Call (#22), Pepper (#24), Ration (#17) Control the Game (Chapter 10)
Barriers –
Pacing of the long-winded and meandering student comments
Managing questions, requests, and comments that are off-task or ready to dispense with All hands Draw bright, clear lines at the beginning and end
Makes activities begin and end crisply and clearly rather than melding together
Makes reference points created more distinct and visible
Improves pacing Brighten lines Create the illusion of speed by using a variety of activities to accomplish your objective
Moving from one to the other throughout the course of the lesson
Nothing for than ten minutes – People begin losing focus after ten minutes and need something new to engage them
Useful for engaging students in many lessons at many points in the academic careers, but beware the shortness of attention spans Change the pace Additional Techniques for Creating Positive Rhythm in the Classroom
Skill of creating the perception that you are moving quickly or change tempo from slow, to steady, to energetic speed
Six techniques for managing illusion of speed in classroom CHAPTER 8
improving your pacing Getting answers wrong is a normal part of learning, don’t make a big deal of it.
Use praise but don’t over do it- kids may be scared to get a question wrong if you use heavy praise for getting a problem right.
Sprinkle in strong praise occasionally. You want to motivate your students. #49Normalize everything Don’t leave them hanging- explain everything
“why do we have to learn this” YOU “to prepare you for college”
Rule is broken- restate the rule- then explain the consequence to avoid the “but what did I do” EXPLIAN everything! #48 explain everything Be constant, don’t let your emotions get in the way
Be level headed
Replace “I’m disappointed in you” with “I expect better of you” #47 emotional constancy The Joy factor = finding joy in work!!
Play games
Make students feel included (use nicknames)
Use songs , drama, and dance to learn (have fun while learning)
Use humor
Routines are great, but throw in an occasional surprise (what's in the bag- inferencing) # 46 the j-factor Once dealt with let it be in the past, clean slate move forward. DON’T hold grudges.
Put your arm around the student when telling them they need to re-do something or bend down to eye level to re-state a class rule. # 45 Warm/Strict Explain everything: don’t leave the student thinking “what did I do”

“your behavior is rude” rather than “you are rude. # 45 Warm/Strict Ask the same question verbatim
Don’t pull a Bait-and-Switch on students by changing the question after the student has raised hand
If questions matter, student need to hear them, consider them, and participate based on thoughtful reflection Verbatim (No bait and switch) Questioning based on theme and variation
Similar sequences of questions applied over and over in different settings Stock questions Rate students answer your questions correctly
If students hit rate is 100 percent - need to start asking harder questions
If students missing a lot of questions - shows problem Hit rate Questioning based on theme and variation
Similar sequences of questions applied over and over in different settings Stock questions Start with a question word
Limits to two clauses
Write them in advance when they matter
Ask an actual question
Assume the answer Clear and concise Ask the same question verbatim
Don’t pull a Bait-and-Switch on students by changing the question after the student has raised hand
If questions matter, student need to hear them, consider them, and participate based on thoughtful reflection Verbatim (No bait and switch) Effective questions engage students thinking about a topic in contained and concrete ways
Then push them to think more deeply and broadly to answer broader and deeper questions more factually, more insightfully, and having willing to take greater risks. Simple to complex Additional techniques for Questioning and Responding for Students will:
Guides students toward understanding when introducing material
To push students to do greater share of the thinking
To remediate an error
To stretch students
To check for understanding Chapter 9
challenging students
t0 think critically Count the time down
Parcel it out in specific increments
Using countdowns
Allows continually set goals for your class’s speed in meeting expectations Work the clock Put an agenda on the board for a lesson or the morning
Add a catchy name to some of the topics on your agenda
Referring to a lesson as: “We’re almost there.” Look forward Keeping short learning activities ready when a two minute opportunity emerges: at the end of class, in the hallway, while waiting for buses, a walk to the bathroom
Reading out loud , reviewing the day’s lessons, mental math, etc. Every minute matters Creates illusion of speed by shifting rapidly involving a wide array of participants
Helps you react to and energize a lagging class quickly and simply
Maximize by using other skills and techniques – Cold Call (#22), Pepper (#24), Ration (#17) Control the Game (Chapter 10)
Barriers –
Pacing of the long-winded and meandering student comments
Managing questions, requests, and comments that are off-task or ready to dispense with All hands Draw bright, clear lines at the beginning and end
Makes activities begin and end crisply and clearly rather than melding together
Makes reference points created more distinct and visible
Improves pacing Brighten lines Create the illusion of speed by using a variety of activities to accomplish your objective
Moving from one to the other throughout the course of the lesson
Nothing for than ten minutes – People begin losing focus after ten minutes and need something new to engage them
Useful for engaging students in many lessons at many points in the academic careers, but beware the shortness of attention spans Change the pace Getting answers wrong is a normal part of learning, don’t make a big deal of it.
Use praise but don’t over do it- kids may be scared to get a question wrong if you use heavy praise for getting a problem right.
Sprinkle in strong praise occasionally. You want to motivate your students. #49Normalize everything Don’t leave them hanging- explain everything
“why do we have to learn this” YOU “to prepare you for college”
Rule is broken- restate the rule- then explain the consequence to avoid the “but what did I do” EXPLIAN everything! #48 explain everything Be constant, don’t let your emotions get in the way
Be level headed
Replace “I’m disappointed in you” with “I expect better of you” #47 emotional constancy The Joy factor = finding joy in work!!
Play games
Make students feel included (use nicknames)
Use songs , drama, and dance to learn (have fun while learning)
Use humor
Routines are great, but throw in an occasional surprise (what's in the bag- inferencing) # 46 the j-factor Once dealt with let it be in the past, clean slate move forward. DON’T hold grudges.
Put your arm around the student when telling them they need to re-do something or bend down to eye level to re-state a class rule. # 45 Warm/Strict Explain everything: don’t leave the student thinking “what did I do”

“your behavior is rude” rather than “you are rude. # 45 Warm/Strict Helps focus students on developing one idea at a time
Focus on questioning with a specific goal or purpose in mind One at a time Additional Techniques for Creating Positive Rhythm in the Classroom
Skill of creating the perception that you are moving quickly or change tempo from slow, to steady, to energetic speed
Six techniques for managing illusion of speed in classroom CHAPTER 8
improving your pacing Rate students answer your questions correctly
If students hit rate is 100 percent - need to start asking harder questions
If students missing a lot of questions - shows problem Hit Rate Questioning based on theme and variation
Similar sequences of questions applied over and over in different settings Stock Questions Start with a question word
Limits to two clauses
Write them in advance when they matter
Ask an actual question
Assume the answer Clear and Concise Ask the same question verbatim
Don’t pull a Bait-and-Switch on students by changing the question after the student has raised hand
If questions matter, student need to hear them, consider them, and participate based on thoughtful reflection Verbatim (No Bait and Switch) Effective questions engage students thinking about a topic in contained and concrete ways
Then push them to think more deeply and broadly to answer broader and deeper questions more factually, more insightfully, and having willing to take greater risks. Simple to Complex Helps focus students on developing one idea at a time
Focus on questioning with a specific goal or purpose in mind One at a Time Additional techniques for Questioning and Responding for Students will:
Guides students toward understanding when introducing material
To push students to do greater share of the thinking
To remediate an error
To stretch students
To check for understanding Chapter 9
Challenging Students
to Think Critically Count the time down
Parcel it out in specific increments
Using countdowns
Allows continually set goals for your class’s speed in meeting expectations Work the Clock Put an agenda on the board for a lesson or the morning
Add a catchy name to some of the topics on your agenda
Referring to a lesson as: “We’re almost there.” Look Forward Keeping short learning activities ready when a two minute opportunity emerges: at the end of class, in the hallway, while waiting for buses, a walk to the bathroom
Reading out loud , reviewing the day’s lessons, mental math, etc. Every Minute Matters Creates illusion of speed by shifting rapidly involving a wide array of participants
Helps you react to and energize a lagging class quickly and simply
Maximize by using other skills and techniques – Cold Call (#22), Pepper (#24), Ration (#17) Control the Game (Chapter 10)
Barriers –
Pacing of the long-winded and meandering student comments
Managing questions, requests, and comments that are off-task or ready to dispense with All Hands Draw bright, clear lines at the beginning and end
Makes activities begin and end crisply and clearly rather than melding together
Makes reference points created more distinct and visible
Improves pacing Brighten Lines Create the illusion of speed by using a variety of activities to accomplish your objective
Moving from one to the other throughout the course of the lesson
Nothing for than ten minutes – People begin losing focus after ten minutes and need something new to engage them
Useful for engaging students in many lessons at many points in the academic careers, but beware the shortness of attention spans Change The Pace Additional Techniques for Creating Positive Rhythm in the Classroom
Skill of creating the perception that you are moving quickly or change tempo from slow, to steady, to energetic speed
Six techniques for managing illusion of speed in classroom CHAPTER 8
Improving Your Pacing Getting answers wrong is a normal part of learning, don’t make a big deal of it.
Use praise but don’t over do it- kids may be scared to get a question wrong if you use heavy praise for getting a problem right.
Sprinkle in strong praise occasionally. You want to motivate your students. #49 Normalize Everything Don’t leave them hanging- explain everything
“why do we have to learn this” YOU “to prepare you for college”
Rule is broken- restate the rule- then explain the consequence to avoid the “but what did I do” EXPLIAN everything! #48 Explain Everything Be constant, don’t let your emotions get in the way
Be level headed
Replace “I’m disappointed in you” with “I expect better of you” #47 Emotional Constancy The Joy factor = finding joy in work!!
Play games
Make students feel included (use nicknames)
Use songs , drama, and dance to learn (have fun while learning)
Use humor
Routines are great, but throw in an occasional surprise (what's in the bag- referencing) # 46 The J-factor Techniques # 46– 49

Chapters 8 & 9 Techniques # 46– 49
Chapters 8 & 9 Teach like a champ! The Joy factor = finding joy in work!!
Play games
Make students feel included (use nicknames)
Use songs , drama, and dance to learn (have fun while learning)
Use humor
Routines are great, but throw in an occasional surprise (what's in the bag- inferencing) # 46 the j-factor
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