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Girl Scout Bronze Award Training

GSWIBC Online Bronze Award Training for Troop Leaders
by Eliza Zimmerman on 13 December 2012

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Transcript of Girl Scout Bronze Award Training

The Girl Scout
Bronze Award This Training will: What is the Girl Scout Bronze Award? Basic Requirements FAQ's Money Earning Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Introduction Contact Info Review the requirements of the Girl Scout Bronze Award
Review Money Earning Policies
Answer Frequently Asked Questions The highest honor a Junior Girl Scout can achieve.
Represents what Girl Scouts can achieve in their communities.
Stands for girl-led leadership and innovation.
Puts into action all three leadership keys (Discover, Connect, Take Action). All girls must:
Be a registered Girl Scout Junior.
Complete all 7 steps to the Bronze Award.
Work as a group but also show individual leadership.
Research, develop and put into action their plans with guidance from adults.
Turn in a final report to the GS Council. The 7 Steps to the Bronze 1. Go on a Girl Scout Journey.
2. Build your Girl Scout Junior team.
3. Explore your community.
4. Choose your Girl Scout Bronze Award project.
5. Make a plan.
6. Put your plan into motion.
7. Spread the word: Turn in your Girl Scout
Bronze Award Final Report and celebrate! Step 1: Go On a Girl Scout Journey All girls must complete one of the Junior Girl Scout Journeys. The choices are:
Agent of Change
Get Moving
Amuse

See the next several slides for a quick review of each of the themes so you can help the girls pick a Journey. Agent of Change Girls read the story of how Meghan, Sun-Ah, Arabela and Araceli become “Agents of Change” and help their local Animal Shelter.
The girls then take cues from the characters on what they want to do in their community to make an equal impact.
Girls earn the Power of One, Power of Team and Power of Community awards. Get Moving! Girls learn about the different ways that energy affects our lives. Some activities are about personal energy and others are about energy you use.
The girls will develop a Take Action project based on energy issues in their community.
Girls earn the Energize, Investigate and Innovate Awards. Amuse Girls learn about the different roles that women play. Roles like student, teacher, athlete, and scientist. They also research the stereotypes that can accompany these roles.
The girls will develop a Take Action project based on busting a stereotype.
Girls earn the Reach Out, Speak Out and Try Out Awards. Step 1: Go on a Girl Scout Journey Girls accomplish Step 1 once they have finished a Journey and achieve all three awards incorporated into it.
Adults must remember to review the Adult Guide for each Journey. The girl book is meant to be a keepsake journal and does not have the complete instructions for the Journey.
Remember to “take detours” or go on tangents as needed if the girls find an interest or skill to learn about on the way. These interests could eventually lead to a Bronze Award project idea. Step 2: Build Your Girl Scout Team Girl Scout Juniors must work as a team to accomplish the Bronze Award.
The team can be made up of other Girl Scout Juniors or a group of friends.
Use each team member’s strengths. For example, if one person is really good at writing, she can develop any flyers the group needs.
All members must be committed to the planned project. Large troops may have to develop two project plans to accommodate the varying interests of girls. Step 3: Explore Your Community Take a detailed look at your community.
Research and find issues that need to be addressed in your area.
Keep notes, this is the beginning of brainstorming a project.
Use the Observation List in the Bronze Award Packet to track ideas. Meet as a team and share what was observed during Step 3.
Brainstorm an idea list.
Research the issues by going to the library, talking to experts and networking.
Girls can use the Project Idea Chart in the Bronze Award Packet to track their research.
At the end have the girls debate and choose a project.
The GIRLS must choose the project. This is part of the learning process built into this award. The adult is there to guide conversation and ask questions, but the girls must be involved in making the final decision. Step 4: Choose Your Project Use the questions in the Bronze Award Packet under Step 5 to help the girls make a plan for the project.
These questions include:
What is our goal?
What steps do we need to take to reach our goal?
What special talents do we need?
What supplies will we need?
How will we earn the money needed for our project?
How much time do we need to finish?
Help the girls come up with a detailed project plan including deadlines and goals. Then help them follow it. Step 5: Make a Plan Figure out who will be doing what.
Assign deadlines and goals to individuals and help them follow through.
Use the chart in the Bronze Award Packet to organize the task list.
Don’t forget to take pictures, shoot video and keep a journal along the way. Keep a record of what the girls are doing! Step 6: Put Your Plan Into Motion Remind the girls to thank everyone that helped them with their project.
Help the girls put together the story of their project so they can share it with friends and family. The girls can do a video, scrapbook, photo collage or anything else they can think of.
Share your story with others to help inspire them to make a difference in their community as well.
Turn in your Bronze Award Final Report to the Girl Scout Council.
Celebrate! Plan a Bronze Award Ceremony to present the girls with their pins. Step 7: Spread the Word Things girls/troops can’t do:
Girl’s must have an adult do the “ask”. An adult must sign all documents related to a donation.
Girl Scouts can not earn money for another organization. You can not give proceeds from a fund raiser directly to another agency.

Things girls/troops can do:
Girl’s can share with donors why they need the items or money they are asking for.
Girls can raise money for their project, then buy items and donate items to another agency.

All troops must always follow the policies in Volunteer Essentials on money earning including getting approval for additional fund raising and tracking all donations over $50. Eliza Zimmerman
Program Specialist – Girl Leadership
zimmermane@gsbadgerland.org
800-236-2710 x 3030

You can also contact your Membership Specialist – Retention for questions. Can an “Individually Registered Girl” (IRG or Juliette) earn the Bronze Award? Yes! The group that she is required to work with can be a group of friends, instead of a troop of Girl Scouts. Can a Bronze Award Project focus inside of Girl Scouting ? Yes. At the Bronze level girls are allowed to do their project within Girl Scouting if that is what they have decided. Who approves a troop or girl Bronze Award project? The troop or group leader gives the final approval for all Bronze Award projects. If the adult has questions about whether a project is appropriate they are encouraged to call the council. How do I know if the project is appropriate for the Bronze Award? Ask yourself or the girls the following: Did the girls come up with the idea?
Are the girls learning new skills?
Is this a new project to the girls? (They aren’t repeating a service project done in the past.)
Does the project get to the “root cause” of the issue?
Does this project fill a need in the community that isn’t already being met?
Is the project safe? If you answered “yes” to all of the questions, the girls are on the right track. You can call the Girl Scout Council for advice if you are still unsure. Who do I call with questions? To get the most out of this training, please use: The GSUSA Bronze Award Packet
OR
The Bronze Award section from the Junior Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting to help you. Please fill out the online form found at: http://gsbadgerland.org/ForGirls/AwardSurvey/tabid/715/Default.aspx
to get credit for this training and also to give us feedback.

Thank you!
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