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EDX3270 Assignment 1

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by Sarah Crossley on 2 April 2013

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Transcript of EDX3270 Assignment 1

The importance of helping 21st
century learners develop
critical multiliteracy skills
through supportive
learning episodes Asselin, M. & Moaveri, M. (2011). Practical strategies: the participatory classroom: web 2.0 in the classroom. Literacy Learning: the Middle Years, 19 (2), i-vii. Retrieved from Education Research Complete database

In today’s ever evolving society it is becoming important for teachers to use strategies when incorporating multiliteracies in their teaching. Asselin & Moaveri (2011) outline various practical strategies for the classroom in the 21st century. In particularly they describe ways of using new literacies and new forms of texts for locating and critically examining information, and ways of sharing and building knowledge (Asselin & Moaveri, 2011). Incorporating social networking, wikis and video sharing into the learning allows learners to build knowledge by sharing and presenting. Ultimately, the article encourages teachers and learners to use these strategies because the technology train is upon us and is not slowing down. Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). Multiliteracies: new literacies new learning. Pedagogies: An International Journal, 4 (3), 164-195.

Cope and Kalantzis are from The New London Group that first came together in 1994 to consider the state and future of literacy pedagogy (Cope & Kalantzis, 2009). This article examines the changing world of not only literacy but also technology and how they are connected in the 21st century classroom. The authors compare the times in saying, “even the idea of a "Google search" was unimaginable in the mid-1990s. However, a search on Google in 2009 showed that more than 60,000 web pages mentioned "multiliteracies" (Cope & Kalantzis, 2009, p.165). Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and learning multiliteracies: changing times, changing literacies. (pp. 56-81). Newark: International Reading Association.

In this article, Anstey and Bull (2006) explore how multiliteracies implicate pedagogical change. Teachers in the 21st century are required to alter their teaching pedagogy to ensure that their students can become multiliterate. Anstey and Bull (2006) identify six phases of learning (focusing, identifying, practising, transferring, reviewing and reporting). These six phases help to develop student’s critical literacy skills and encourage explicit multiliteracies teaching to assist in developing these skills. The New London Group (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: designing futures. Harvard Educational Review, 66 (1), 60-93. Retrieved from EJS database.

The New London Group are a group of authors who met for one week in 1994 to discuss the state of literacy pedagogy (The New London Group, 1996). The article was written to identify the changing social environment for students and teachers and the new approach to literacy pedagogy called multiliteracies. The New London Group (1996) gives an overview of their own approach to a new pedagogy that includes situated practice, overt instruction, critical framing and transformed practice. These four components of pedagogy are not to be applied in a particular order and should relate to the learning experience. Stewart-Dore, N. (2003). Strategies for practising multiliteracies. In G. Bull, & M. Anstey (Eds.), The literacy lexicon (2nd ed., pp. 161-180). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Prentice Hall
Stewart-Dore (2003) believes that the aim of modern schooling is to help students to become lifelong and strategic leaners who are flexible and multiskilled. The article highlights the importance of learners being able to recognise and apply the most applicable learning strategy for a particular context. Stewart-Dore (2003) makes it known that you must become a strategic learner, identify strategies for practicing multiliteracies and evaluate the selection of strategies. Teaching strategies should be constructed so that they facilitate the construction and communication of new knowledge in meaningful ways. Jones, A. (2008). Multimedia and multiliteracies in the early elementary years. In J. Luca & E. Weippl (Eds.), Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2008 (pp. 2942-2948). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org.ezproxy.usq.edu.au/p/28783.

The article by Jones (2008) gives examples of ways teachers have used multiliteracies in their classrooms. The author recognises the importance of incorporating different ICTs into all of the learning areas. Each example illustrates how students use paper and pen resources first and follow it up by using various ICT programs and activities. This allows the author to provide evidence of multiliteracies being used in the classroom and the potential they can have on learners in the 21st century. Ajayi, L. (2011). A Multiliteracies Pedagogy: Exploring Semiotic Possibilities of a Disney Video in a Third Grade Diverse Classroom. Urban Review, vol.43, issue 3, p. 396-413, viewed 30 March 2013. Education Research Complete database, EBSCOHost, DOI 10.1007/s11256-010-0151-0
Using video to assist students in understanding and comprehending a text can be very useful according to this article by Ajayi (2011). The article was written after a test was conducted of a third grade diverse classroom in the United States. Students in this classroom are taught comprehension skills using a Disney movie and created their understanding in visual images. Using this multimodal resource, students were able to identify and apply their skills in language, art and literacy. Hughes, J. & Robertson, L. (2010). Transforming Practice: Using Digital Video to Engage Students. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 10(1), 20-37. AACE. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org.ezproxy.usq.edu.au/p/32270.

Janette Hughes and Lorayne Robertson are from the University of Ontario Institute of Technology and the article they have written concentrates on a case study carried out on three beginning teachers and their use of digital literacy (particularly the creation of digital literacy autobiography). The article explores the changing perceptions of multiple literacies as well as how their changing perceptions helped shape or transform their lesson planning. The three teachers used digital video in their planning and responded well to it as well did the students. Hughes, J. & Robertson, L. (2010). Transforming Practice: Using Digital Video to Engage Students. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 10(1), 20-37. AACE. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org.ezproxy.usq.edu.au/p/32270.
Janette Hughes and Lorayne Robertson are from the University of Ontario Institute of Technology and the article they have written concentrates on a case study carried out on three beginning teachers and their use of digital literacy (particularly the creation of digital literacy autobiography). The article explores the changing perceptions of multiple literacies as well as how their changing perceptions helped shape or transform their lesson planning. The three teachers used digital video in their planning and responded well to it as well did the students. Chiu, W.T. & Hung, H.T. (2011). Multimodal Texts: Making Language Learners into Designers. In T. Bastiaens & M. Ebner (Eds.), Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2011 (pp. 3398-3404). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org.ezproxy.usq.edu.au/p/38345.

The article by Chiu and Hung is one based on the New London Groups (1996) multiliteracies pedagogy and Cope and Kalantzis’ (2000) model of multimodal design (Chiu & Hung, 2011). The two authors from Taiwan explored English language learners’ multiliteracies with regard to their design of multimodal texts. Their study was assessed using Cope and Kalantzis’ (2000) model of multimodal design; linguistic, visual, gestural, auditory and spatial design. The study showed that the students had to design a slide presentation and when analysing them, most students showed awareness and attention to linguistic and visual designs. Technology and literacy are both evolving rapidly in the 21st century classroom. They are both vital to the teaching and learning episodes and need to be delivered in the right way. In 1996, the New London Group developed the term ‘multiliteracies’ due to the changing world and our capacity to communicate through new media. This overview will link the 10 annotations above to a common theme of the importance of helping 21st century learners develop critical multi-literacy skills through supportive learning episodes. Anstey and Bull (2006) make it clear that a person needs to be flexible in order to understand that literacy and literate practices are dynamic not static, and they change as a result of social, cultural, and technological change. With society today being highly driven through ICTs, a large commonality between the articles is the notion of utilising ICTs as a vehicle for multiliterate learning. A multiliterate pedagogy requires teaching the thinking, behavioral, and social skills that are associated with being multiliterate (Bull & Anstey, 2006). Cope and Kalantzis (2009) believe that literacy needs much more than the traditional basics of reading and writing the national language: in the new economy workplace, it is a set of supple, variable, communication strategies, ever-diverging according to the cultures and social languages of technologies, functional groups, types of organization and niche clienteles. It is important for teachers and students to understand that the literacy and technology are vital in the 21st century classroom in order to develop critical multiliteracy skills that support them through their lifelong journey. With text being a major part of student’s lives, it is vital that your students develop the critical literacy skills to be able to become effective text participants. This notion is supported by Wray (2009) and Santoro (2004) who draw on Freebody and Luke’s (1990) ‘four resources model’, suggesting that the combined four resources are integral for students to become literate as they develop the skills of breaking the code of texts, participating in the meanings of text, using texts functionally, and critically analysing and transforming texts. In reflection of all 10 articles, it is evident that literacy is vital to the learning of all students in every learning area and without it students will struggle to understand the meaning of any concept. I believe it is imperative that all educators understand that they are teachers of literacy and must fully support and adopt a need for a multiliterate classroom. Reflect.... When I began to look at this assignment I wanted to firstly, be able to gain a better understanding of literacies and ICTs together and fully understand the concept of the word ‘multiliteracies’. Secondly, I wanted to extend my ICT capabilities and create something that I had never done before so as to learn more about different online resources and add another skill to my toolbelt.
During the process of researching, reading and completing my 10 annotations and the synthesis I began to comprehend what the word multiliteracies is and why it is important as a pre-service teacher to understand this now and begin to think about how I will integrate them into my lesson planning.
I came across some difficulties when creating my prezi, being that I needed more information on there than what I could actually fit. After playing around on the website and reading some of the frequently asked questions I overcame my obstacle and finished entering in my information onto my Prezi where it now all fits and follows on from one another.
If I were to do anything different for another time, say creating a multimodal presentation, I may create something much different and include more ICTs on my presentation such as a video to break up all of the text.
I feel that through completion of this assignment I am confident and competent in the area of literacies and ICTs as a linked component of the curriculum. I know that I can be creative and challenge myself in these areas if I want to and I know that multiliteracies are going to be vital when I become a teacher. Synthesis
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