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Victorian & Steampunk Architecture

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by David Fliesen on 25 September 2013

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Transcript of Victorian & Steampunk Architecture

Victorian &
What is
Forces
Revivals &
What is
Genre inspired by:


Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Jules Verne, and H.G. Wells


Leonardo da Vinci, Charles Babbage, Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison, and Albert Einstein
Resources
Cleanslate, A.E., Introduction to Victorian Architecture (2010). YouTube videos (Parts 1 and 2).

Scoble, R., A demo of Charles Babbage's Difference Engine (2010).
YouTube video.

New Babbage Academy of Industry, Second Life.

Vendermeer, J. (2011).  The Steampunk Bible: an illustrated guide to the world of imaginary airships, corsets and goggles, mad scientists, and strange literature. New York, NY: Abrams Image.

Marsocci, J and DeBlasio, A with illustrations by Berry, B. (2011). How to Draw Steampunk. Irvine, CA: Walter Foster.
ARCHITECTURE
By David Fliesen,
Media Arts & Animation
The Art Institute of VA Beach
No such thing, except:
• As time went on, many
details blended and merged
• Modern viewers often
regard any building within
the various revivals as
"Victorian"
• Based on 11th Century French and Spanish precedents
• Rough-faced square stones
• Round towers, cone-shaped roofs
• Columns and pilasters with spirals and leaf designs
• Low, broad "Roman" arches over arcades and doorways
• Patterned masonry arches over windows
Victorian
College
(Toronto)
Caldwell School
• With low roofs, wide eaves
• Ornamental brackets (sometimes called the "bracketed style")
• Emphasized quoins
• Often symmetrical
• Generous porches
Breakers Hotel
(Newport, RI)
Billingsgate Fish
Market (London)
• Boxy Mansard Roofs
• Tall Windows
• Dormers
• Recessed Entry
• Eave Brackets
• Bay Windows
Precursor: Industrial Architecture
• For a generation, dominant build MOTIF: no MOTIF
• Warehouses, Factories, Workhouses, Housing
• Practical designs, little conscious aesthetics
• Non-professional builders
• Few architects
Forces: Consciousness and Reaction
Precursor: Industrial Architecture
Forces: Moral Fervor
• Religious architecture
meant moral
redemption
• "Rightness" used to
enforce and justify
certain ideas
o Middle class and a
large portion of the
elite were
sympathetic
Forces: New Technologies
• Demand growing so quickly, immediate precedents couldn't evolve fast enough
• Technology = unsettling; old forms=reassuring
• Factory-built details put craftsmanship within reach
Forces: Prosperity
• Transportation meant options beyond
cheap/local materials
• More builders, more projects
• Industrialists replaced nobility as clients
• Professionalism meant exams, which
meant a formalization of study, which
meant a more rapid and formal dispersal
of ideas
• Exterior form had been subordinated to
interior use, prosperity meant it could
now be reconsidered
Guild, R. (1989).  The Victorian House Book. New York, NY: Rizzoli International Publications, Inc..

Wedd, K. (2002).  The Victorian Society Book of The Victorian House. London: Aurum Press Limited.

McAlester, V and McAlester, L. (2011).  Great American Homes and their Architectural Styles. New York, NY: Abbeville Publishing Group.
Presentation by David Fliesen, Media Arts & Animation Student @ The Art Institute of Virginia Beach
• Neoclassicism/Neo-Grec
o "Old-fashioned" by late Victorian age
• Renaissance Revival
o Symmetrical, based on Venetian
precedents
• Folk Victorian
o Simple, stripped-down versions of
the ornamented style of the day
• Arts and Crafts movement
o Reaction against formalism, return
to pre-Victorian models
• Exposed
trusses
("stickwork")
• Gables and
decorative
shingles
• Details
borrowed from
Tudor/Medieval
precedents
• Largely residential, single-family, middle class
• Patterned shingles
• Round turrets
• Wrap-around porches
Fulton Mansion
(California)
• Flattened, cusped "Tudor" arches
• Lighter stone trims around windows and doors
• Carved brick detailing
• Steep roof gables
• Terracotta brickwork
• Balustrades and parapets
• Pillars supporting porches and high chimneys
Harlaxton Manor
Manchester Town Hall
Italianate
• John Ruskin (critic)
o Art (and architecture) are
a reflection of morality
• Augustus Pugin
(houses of parliament)
o Codified Gothic architecture,
blueprint for later architects
o Construction should be
decorated
• Decoration and revival
movements: the height of
modernity
• 1851 Exhibition (Crystal Palace):
utility should be the basis of art
Mills
Metropolitan Wharf
Steampunk
on
Gears
Steam Power
Clockworks
Dirigibles
Mechanical
Computers
Victorian styled characters with an edge from an age that never was.
Celebrates Spirit of the Inventor within the 1800s age of industrialization
Literary Giants
Steampunk?
The term was coined in the late 80s
Consciousness
and Reaction
Moral
Fervor
New
Technologies
Prosperity
Victorian Architecture?
Industrial
Landscapes
Inventors
Gothic Revival
Second Empire
Jacobethan
Queen Anne
(Stick Eastlake)
Stick Style
Other Styles
Influences
on
• Arches, pointed windows
• Masonry buildings = Medieval cathedrals
• Wood-frame buildings = lacy "gingerbread" trim and playful details
Salvation
Army Citadel
Paddington
Station
Victorian &
Steampunk
Romanesque Revival
Iolani Palace
(Honolulu)
Time
Machines
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