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Mallard Duck Life Cycle

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by Emma Amory on 13 August 2013

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Transcript of Mallard Duck Life Cycle

INCUBATION
HATCHING / BROODING
http://www.arkive.org/mallard/anas-platyrhynchos/video-09c.html
LEARNING TO SWIM
LEARNING TO EAT
Mallard groups can often be seen head dipping or completely upending in the water. They rarely dive though, spending their time near the surface and dabbling for invertebrates, fish, amphibians, and a variety of plants. They also graze on land, feeding on grains and plants.
OSPREY
HERON
BITTERN
GREAT
CRESTED
GREBE
LITTLE
GREBE
MALLARD
TEAL
COOT
MOORHEN
LITTLE
EGRET
WATER-
RAIL
COMMON
SNIPE
KING
FISHER
REED
BUNTING
SEDGE
WARBLER
YELLOW
WAGTAIL
SAND
MARTIN
REED
WARBLER
Can you guess which egg belongs to the Mallard Duck?
This is a male Mallard, otherwise known as a drake!
MALLARD DUCK LIFE CYCLE
This is a female Mallard, otherwise known as a hen!
The most distinctively colored of the mallards, its iconic green head sits atop a white neckband that sets off a chestnut-colored chest and gray body.
Females are mottled drab brown in color, but sport iridescent purple-blue wing feathers that are visible as a patch on their sides.
Mallard hens normally lay about a dozen eggs, and the incubation period lasts just under a month. Mallards are territorial during much of this period, but once incubation is well underway, males abandon the nest and join a flock of other males.
Where can you find the Mallard Duck?
Mallards prefer calm, shallow sanctuaries, but can be found in almost any body of freshwater across Australia, Asia, Europe, and North America. They’re also found in saltwater and brackish water and are commonly found in wetlands.
LEARNING TO FLY
Mallards fly in groups called flocks. Like most migratory birds, mallards fly in the famous V formation. During winter migration, mallards fly south in search of warm weather, often resting at the same spots year after year. Migrating mallards can travel great distances, relying on rivers, coasts, and valleys to find their way.
MATING / BREEDING
Mated pairs migrate to and breed in the northern parts of their range and build nests on the ground or in a protected cavity.
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