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Year 8 - World War One 1914-1918

Scheme of Work for Year 8.
by

Michael Brodie

on 3 February 2016

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Transcript of Year 8 - World War One 1914-1918

1) Take a clean double page in your books.
2) Using a RULER draw a timeline like the one below in through the middle of the double page in your books.
3) The dates on the timeline need to go from 1914 to 1920.
3)Draw lines from the timeline to give you space to stick your information in.

USE A RULER!!















World War I: 1914-1918
Why did the Schlieffen Plan fail?
Learning Objectives
Know - Describe what the Schlieffen Plan was.

Understand - Explain why the Schlieffen Plan failed.

Skills - Cause and Consequence.
Learning Objectives
Know - Key features and events of World War One.

Understand - The chronological order of key events of World War.

Concept - Chronology.

Skills - Source inference, creating a timeline, categorising evidence.
What is the chronology of World War One?
TASK: World War One Timeline
Learning Objectives
K

U

S
The Causes of the First World War
Activity - Design a way for Germany to win a potential war
Using the information sheet you need to design a way for Germany to win the war.

Success Criteria:
*You need to decide which country (France or Russia) you will fight first.
*You need to be able to justify why you made the decisions you did.
* You need to decide how you will attack them.

You have a limited time, if you don't design your plan quickly you wont be prepared for the coming war!
Why did people volunteer to go to war?
Would you take this job?
Thousands of children lied about their age to sign up!
Did a cheese sandwich trigger 16 million deaths?
Who was the biggest winner from the Treaty of Versailles?
Changes to the boundaries of countries after WWI
What was the Treaty of Versailles?
So what did the Germans do?
Why didn't the Schlieffen Plan Work?
Can describe the Schlieffen Plan.


Can explain why the Schlieffen Plan was a failure.


Can create their own plan for how Germany could win the war.
Say what you see!
As historians it is our job to know that different interpretations of the same people and events exist and to understand and explain why that is.
Watch the videos and answer the questions on your sheet.
In 1914 thousands of men across Europe joined up to fight in the First World War.

Why?
The reasons why they joined can be divided into 'push' and 'pull' factors.

A push factor is something that made them leave.

A pull factor is something that made people want to go.
What is an historical Interpretation?

Make a mind map explaining what you think it is.
Include:
What they are.
Why they differ.
How we judge which interpretations are better than others.
Try to give examples.
Learning Objectives
Know - What a historical interpretation is.

Understand - Explain why we have different interpretations.

Skills - Developing our ability to analyse historical interpretations.
Lesson 1: What is an interpretation?
Can describe what a historical interpretation is.



Can explain why there are different historical interpretations.



Can identify the strengths and weaknesses of a historical interpretation.
Activity -
George Clemenceau
David Lloyd George
Woodrow Wilson
What did the Big Three want at Versailles?
The 'Big Three' were the leaders of France, Britain and the USA.
Was the Treaty of Versailles fair?
YES
NO
Who do you would have been happiest with the Treaty of Versailles out of the 'Big Three'? Explain your answer.
PEE in your paragraph:
Point, Evidence, Explain
Listen and then write down what Clemenceau wants.
Listen and then write down what Lloyd George wants.
Listen and then write down what Woodrow Wilson wants.
Learning Objectives
Know - What the Treaty of Versailles was and what the 'Big Three' wanted.

Understand - Explain why each leader had different aims.

Skills - Evidence skills
Can describe the aims of the 'Big Three.'



Can explain why the 'Big Three' had different aims.


Can examine the terms to make a judgement about who got the best deal.
Describes who would have been happiest.


Explains why one country would have been happiest using evidence.


Compares the different countries and makes a judgement on which country would have been happiest using evidence.
Work as pairs to match the dates with the events to create a chronology of World War One.
Learning Outcomes
Let's test your knowledge......
Quiz time!!!

Close your books please.
step 1: Card Sort
E.g.
July 1914
World War One breaks out 10 years after the "Entente Cordiale" was signed. On one side are Britain, France and Russia and on the other are Germany, Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire (Turkey). The war lasts 4 years.
Step 2: World War One Timeline
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
World War One breaks out.
On one side are Britain, France and Russia and on the other are are Germany, Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire (Turkey). The war lasts over 4 years.
?
?

Now as investigators, we need to decide whether the culprit was:

A) The Cheese Sandwich
B) Assassination
C) The Alliance System
D) Imperialism
E) Militarism
F) Nationalism
I will find out what started WWI, even if it is the last thing I do!
Your mission for today's lesson is to make a judgement about what or who was responsible for the outbreak of World War One and justify why.
It's story time:
Bosnia
The Cafe, which is now a museum.
ARCHDUKE FRANZ FERDINAND
The Black Hand
Gavrilo Princip
Learning Objectives
Know - Which countries formed alliances and with whom

Understand - Why countries formed alliances and the consequences of these alliances.

Skills - Causation
How did the alliance system help to cause the war?
What makes you a good friend to someone?
TASK
Step 1 - Colour in the two alliances in different colours and label them Triple Alliance (1880) and Triple Entente (1907).
Britain
France
Germany
Austria-Hungary
Italy
Russia
Step 2 - Stick the sheet into your book.
Step 3 - Answer the following questions:

Q1)Explain in your own words what an alliance is.
Q2) Look at where the countries in the "Triple Entente" are located. Why might Germany feel threatened by this arrangement?
Q3) The war broke out in 1914. Do you think the 'alliance system' is a long-term or short-term cause of the war. Explain your answer.
In _____ Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy formed an alliance. This was called the ______ Allaince. By ____ Britain, France and Russia had also made an alliance called the Triple ________. This meant that all the major powers in _________ were part of an alliance. Countries formed alliances because they were _______ of each other's military strength.
Can name the countries that formed alliances and what these alliances were called.

Can explain why the alliance system led to war.

Can interpret the message of a primary source which deals with the alliance system.
What does this cartoon suggest are the conseqences of the alliance system?
"The Chain of Friendship"
Team A
Team B
In the years before 1914, the countries of Europe
formed alliances. It was this web of complicated friendships which led to war.
1907
1880
Entente
Triple
fearful
Europe
TASK
Copy the paragraph and fill in the gaps.
Long-term causes of the war: Militarism, Imperialism and Nationalism
Is it ok to:

Dislike people from other countries just because they are not from England and to think that England is better than all other countries?

Invade other countries and claim them as your own?

Be really aggressive and look for a fight?
Well in Europe in 1914, this is exactly what happened.
Think, Pair, Share
What's the odd one out?
Mini Depth Study: Why have interpretations of Haig changed over time?
A) France
B) Britain
C) Austria-Hungary
A) Germany
B) Italy
C) Austria-Hungary
A) USA
B) France
C) Britain
A) 1914
B) 1917
C) 1924
Dislike people from other countries just because they are not from England and think that England is better than all other countries?


Invade other countries and claim them as your own?


Be really aggressive and look for a fight?


This is called....... nationalism.
This is called.......... imperialism.
This is called....... militarism.
Imperialism
Nationalism
Now we know the MAIN causes of the First World War.

What do you think MAIN stands for?
Learning Objectives
Know - The long-term causes of World War One.

Understand - How these causes helped to lead to war.

Skills - Cause and Consequence
Can describe the causes of the war.


Can explain the causes of the war.


Can draw links between the causes and explain how they influenced each other.
In 1914, the British Empire was huge!!!
It was worried that Germany was trying to build its own empire.
Empire - land controlled by a country which are outside its borders
Militarism
Countries across Europe started to build up their armies and navies.
Many countries were so passionate about their countries they wanted to fight for them.
TASK
Read the information on the sheet and answer the questions in FULL sentences.
The cheese sandwich
The funeral
The car
The alliances
TASK
Create a word cloud to demonstrate your judgement on which is the most important reason for the war. E.g.
The biggest is your most important reason.
The smallest is your least important reason.
It should include:
1) Militarism.
2) Alliances.
3) Imperialism.
4) Nationalism.
5) Assassination.
6) Cheese Sandwich
Learning Objectives
Know - Short-term causes of the war.

Understand - How a range of causes combined to lead to war.

Skills - Cause and Consequence
I love cheese sandwiches
Success Criteria
TASK
Write a paragraph or 2 justifying why you have chosen the cause you think is the most important.
Success Criteria
Makes a judgement on the most important cause of WW1.


Compares this cause with other causes.


Demonstrates how the causes are linked.
Makes a judgement on the most important cause of WW1.


Compares this cause with other causes.


Demonstrates how the causes are linked.
Arrange these into Long-term causes short-term causes and coincidences.
Militarism
Alliances
Nationalism
Imperialism
Cheese sandwich
Assasination
The Schlieffen Plan did not work for a number of reasons. Firstly, ___________ kept its alliance with Belgium and declared war on Germany. Secondly, __________ army fought harder than expected and slowed the German advance. Thirdly, __________ mobilised its army in just ____ days. This meant Germany had to fight a war on __________ fronts. Finally, Britain defeated Germany at the Battle of _______ which halted the German advance.

Words:
two, Belgium's, Russia, Britain, ten, Mons.
Was Germany to blame for the war?
NO
PARTIALLY
YES
1) They attacked France through Belgium.
2) They planned to use 90% of their army to defeat France and take Paris within the 6 weeks they thought it would take Russia to mobilise.
3) They planned to use 10% of their army to defend the border with Russia then send their whole army to Russia once the French had been defeated.
ANSWER
You get to travel and see lots of the world.

There is a risk you might die.

You are not fed very well.

You will get paid a lot of money.

You will get a lot of respect from other people.

You only have to do it for three months.

You have to do exactly what you are told.

If you don't do it your family friends would be really disappointed in you.
Learning Objectives
Know - The reasons why people volunteered for the war.

Understand - How propaganda was used to convince people to volunteer.

Skills - Analysing Evidence
In your own words explain what is meant by a conscientious objecter.
TASK
In a table separate the following into push and pull factors.
recruitment posters
money
pressure from friends/family
chance for adventure
nationalism
the belief that it would be over quickly.
the chance to go with friends
During the war there were many recruitment posters trying to convince people to go to war
1)What does the poster show?

2)Who is the poster meant to persuade?

3) What is the main message that the poster is giving about why people should join?

4) What has the artist done to get you to accept the message?

5) What factor for joining up does it appeal to?

6) Would this poster be likely to make a person join to fight? Why or why not?
Not everyone went to war. Some men refused to fight because they thought killing was wrong. These men were called conscientious objecters. They were made fun of and sometimes put in prison.
Men who did not volunteer were often handed white feathers in the streets. This was to show that they were cowards.
TASK
Success Criteria
Can describe reasons why people volunteered.

Can categorise these reasons into push and pull factors.

Can analyse a recruitment poster to explain why they convinced people to join up.
chance to have a career
Look at the poster and answer in full sentences
Learning Objectives
Know - Can describe the features of a trench.

Understand - How trench warfare began and why it favoured defence.

Skills - Empathy and Cause and Consequence
Success Criteria
What was trench warfare?
Can describe describe the layout of a trench.

Can explain why the war favoured defence rather than offence.


Can analyse films and make a judgement on how realistic they portray trench warfare.
TASK
Read p.10 of the textbook and Sources A,B and C.
1) Complete the trench diagram and add the following labels: periscope, barbed wire , dugout, sandbags, firestep, machine gun.

2)Explain why barbed wire would be put at the top of the trench and why there were duckboards at the bottom..
TASK
Watch the video and answer the following questions:

What advantages did defenders have?

What disadvantages did attackers have?

What impression do these videos give of going of what it was like to go 'over the top?' Explain your answer.

How reliable is the video in showing what it was like to go 'over the top?'
Watch the video and then answer the questions in FULL sentences
1)Why and how did trench warefare begin?

2)Why were trenches in a zig-zag?

3)Why were there three lines of trenches.

4) What was 'No Man's Land?'
Unscramble these words to make weapons used in the First World War
menacing uh
hells
lifer
sag
angered
ANSWERS
menacing uh - machine gun
sag - gas
lifer - rifle
angered - grenade
hells - shell
How can we challenge simplified history about the First World War?
Learning Objectives
Know - The key features of trench life.

Understand - The reality of life in the trenches.

Skills - Evidence and analysis
Success Criteria
Can describe features of trench life.


Can explain the reality of trench life using evidence.


Can criticise a simplified myth of life in the trenches using evidence.
Challenging Myth 1: "Soldiers spent most of their time fighting"
Now let's peer assess.
Success Criteria
On each station you will find some evidence that will help you challenge our myth.

You will have 3 minutes at each station to:
1) Read the information.
2) Note down how it challenges our myth that "life in the trenches was all fighting."
In the back of your books:
Write one or two sentences answering this question:
What impression do these images give of a soldier's daily life in World War One?
The myths we are going to explore:
Myth One: Soldiers spent most of their time fighting.

Myth Two: The fighting took place only in trenches.

Myth Three: Military tactics in World War One did not change.
TASK
Now you have the evidence you can write a response to the following statement:

"During the First World War soldiers spent most of the time fighting." How far is this statement correct?

Success Criteria:
*Aim for over half a page.
*Say whether you agree or disagree with the statement.
*Include evidence from at least 3 stations you have visited during the lesson.
*PEE in your paragraphs - point, evidence, explain.

Can describe features of trench life.


Can explain the reality of trench life using evidence.


Can criticise a simplified myth of life in the trenches using evidence.
Myth Two: Fighting Only Took Place in the Trenches
STARTER:
Study the photographs.
Write down 3 questions you would like to ask about them.
Learning Objectives
Know - The different theatres of war.

Understand - Why the importance of the war in different areas.

Skills - Significance
Success Criteria
Can describe the different theatres of war.


Can explain the importance of the different theatres of war.


Can use evidence to challenge the myth: Fighting only took place in trenches.
The War On Civilians
http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips/z88fcdm
Theatres of War
Debate
Was the bombing of civilians in World War One justified?
Yes
No
The War at Sea
The War Underground
The War in the Air
TASK
Now you have the evidence you can write a response to the following statement:

"Fighting only took place in trenches." How far is this statement correct?

Success Criteria:
*Aim for over half a page.
*Say whether you agree or disagree with the statement.
*Include evidence from the videos you have watched during the lesson.
*PEE in your paragraphs - point, evidence, explain.
World War One Bingo
Write down any five of the following in the back of your books:
trench Germany
barbed wire Triple Entente
militarism
shell
gas nationalism artillery
zeppelin
propaganda
morning hate
machine gun Franz Ferdinand
Black Hand volunteer no man's land
alliance
battleship
Triple Alliance
Myth Three: Military Tactics did not Change
Learning Objectives
Know - Different military tactics of the First World War.

Understand - How military tactics changed during the war.

Skills - Change and Continuity
Success Criteria
Can describe the military tatics


Can explain why these tactics were used.

Can criticise the myth; "military tactics did not change during the First World War"
Homework
Now you have the evidence you can write a response to the following statement:

"Fighting only took place in trenches." How far is this statement correct?

Success Criteria:
*Aim for over half a page.
*Say whether you agree or disagree with the statement.
*Include evidence from the videos you have watched during the lesson.
*PEE in your paragraphs - point, evidence, explain.

Due Date: Wednesday 12 February
On each station you will find some evidence that will help you challenge the myth.

You will have 3 minutes at each station to:
1) Read the information.
2) Note down how it challenges the myth that "Military tactics did not change."
TASK
Now you have the evidence you can write a response to the following statement:

"Military tactics did not change during the First World War." How far is the statment correct?

Success Criteria:
*Aim for over half a page.
*Say whether you agree or disagree with the statement.
*Include evidence from at least 3 stations you have visited during the lesson.
*PEE in your paragraphs - point, evidence, explain.

Learning Objectives
Know - The events of the Battle of the Somme

Understand - The reasons why the Battle of the Somme was so bloody.

Skills - Cause and Consequence
Success Criteria
Why was the Battle of the Somme so bloody?
Can describe the Battle of the Somme.


Can explain the reasons why it was so bloody.

Can make a judgement on the key reasons


Review
General
Lance Corporal
Major
Idenitfies key features of World War One.
Explains the Chronology of World War One.
Categorises key events of World War One.
The First World War began just over 100 years ago, in August 1914. It ended in November 1918.

Use these images to make a list of key words or phrases of what the war was like.

Think about what they show - use the captions to help.

What was fighting like?
What was life for soldiers like?
Who was fighting?
Success Criteria
General
Lance Corporal
Major
Aranges the timeline in the correct chronological order.
Makes gaps between events show the different length of time between them.
Colour codes the events into different types of event: military and political.
July 1914
September 1914
July 1916
September 1916
April 1917
February 1918
November 1918
June 1919
Full transcript