Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

the decomposers of the deciduous forest asia

No description
by

deyza kellum

on 8 May 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of the decomposers of the deciduous forest asia

The decomposers in the deciduous forest asia.
Stinkhorn fungi
The foul-smelling slime attracts insects to eat them.
Little do the insects know its covering their little insect feet with stinkhorn spores.
egg shaped blob on the soil,- the production.
Live on the forest floor, near other plants.
Bactillus subtilis
The subtilis is rod-shaped.
protective exterior, called an endospore.
It increases its resistance for warm and cool.
It lives in dirt and other parts of the forest.
My sources
They grow in fields, lawns or rotting land.
Inside the puffballs are small brown dry spores which come out when the fungi is squeezed.
Most puffballs are safe to eat.
Puffball fungi
shelf fungi
http://www.mushroomexpert.com/phallaceae.html

http://www.ehow.com/list_7439017_list-bacteria-temperate-deciduous-forest.html

http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/ne_asian_decid_forest.htm

http://solutionsforyourlife.ufl.edu/hot_topics/lawn_and_garden/stinkhorns.html

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20101107093016AAiPo6l
Shelf fungi don't have a stalk.
Have a smooth underside with miniature pores.
Shelf fungi are important in breaking down wood.
The spores have to drop down the pore into the air without sticking to the sides.
Lives on trees.
Full transcript