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Vegetarianism

Is a vegetarian diet better than a diet that includes meat? YES: a vegetarian diet is healthier and more human choice. NO: a vegetarian diet is not necessarily better than a diet that includes meat.
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Sylvie Tran

on 31 May 2011

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Transcript of Vegetarianism

Vegetarianism Introduction Good nutrition is essential for well-being, health and development. Dietary factors are associated with some of the leading causes of death, including coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Worldwide obesity rates are expanding at an alarming rate. Some try to combat excessive weight gain with fad diets, which promise, but often fail to deliver, a quick fix. In addition to issues in diet and nutrition, food safety is also a concern. Threats to food safety are wide-ranging, such as the dangers associated with salmonella, listeria and other foodborne illnesses; mercury contamination of seafood; a rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria from the misuse and overuse of antibiotics in animal farming and the presence of harmful industrial chemicals in imported ingredients. In recent years, food safety concerns have generated a rise in the popularity of organic foods. Other topics in food and nutrition include, but are not limited to, genetically modified (GM) foods, vegetariansm, herbal supplements, and the local food movement. Source1: Lots of Red Meat Increases The Risk of Mortality. Results of the study examining the health risks of diets laden with red meat like hamburger and processed meats like hot dogs, bacon and cold cuts show that "older people who eat large amounts of red meat and processed meats face a greater risk of death from heart disease and cancer." (Spartanburg Herald-Journal)
Over 10 years, eating the equivalent of a quarter-pound hamburger daily gave men in the study a 22% higher risk of dying of cancer and a 27% higher risk of dying of heart disease. That's compared to those who ate the least red meat, just 5 ounces per week.
Women who ate large amounts of red meat had a 20% higher risk of dying of cancer and a 50% higher risk of dying of heart disease than women who ate less.
For processed meats, the increased risks for large quantities were slightly lower overall than for red meat. The researchers compared deaths in the people with the highest intakes to deaths in people with the lowest to calculate the increased risk.
"I'm not saying everybody should turn into vegetarians," Politi said. "Meat should be a supporting actor on the plate, not the main character."
Works cited: Jonhson, Carla K. "Study: Lots of Red Meat Increased Mortality Risk." Spartanburg Herald-Journal. 24 March 2009: n.p. SIRS Researcher. Web. 23 May 2010. Source 2: More Young People Go the Vegetarian Route. Young people cite a host of reasons for going meat-free, such as personal taste, concerns about animal treatment, environmental questions surrounding livestock and the influence of peers and celebrities.
But Kaayla Daniel, a clinical nutritionist in Albuquerque and author of The Whole Soy Story: The Dark Side of America's Favorite Health Food, says, "I do think children will grow better on a high-quality omnivorous diet." She also says that human teeth and digestive systems prove we were designed to eat both animal and vegetable foods.
"Vegan diets often lead to serious deficiencies of vitamins, minerals, fatty acids and amino acids," Kaayla says, which puts vegan children :at risk for malnutrition, digestive distress, allergies and immune system breakdown."
Countering lingering concerns, a 2003 American Dietetic Association review of scientific literature concluded that well-planned vegan and other types of vegetarian diets can be appropriate for all ages.
"A vegetarian diet can be very healthy if it's done intelligently," says Elizabeth Turner, executive editor of Los Angeles-based Vegetarian Times magazine.

Marcus, Mary Brophy. "More Young People Go the Vegetarian Route." USA TODAY. 15 Oct 2007: D9. SIRS Researcher. Web.23 May 2010. Source 3: Perils of Meat-Free Teen Diet. This article presents the findings of a new study examining the link between "young people who say they are vegetarians and eating disorders."
The study found that 19.6% of the current vegetarians and 20.9% of former vegetarians used some form of extreme, unhealthy weight-control behaviors (such as using a diet pill or laxatives or inducing vomiting), and 21.2% and 16%, respectively, said they had binged on food with a loss of control. In comparison, 9.4% of the never-vegetarian group had used extreme, unhealthy weight-control behaviors and only 4.4% said they had lost control while eating and binged (skinny).
"These findings suggest that...current adolescent and young adult vegetarians are at greatest risk for binge eating with loss of control. Reasons for this might be due, in part, to heightened awareness of food intake in general among practicing vegetarians and, thus, a greater likelihood to report eating and feeling a loss of control. Possible triggers for binge-eating episodes may also be related to self-imposed restrictions of certain foods or a decreased level of satiety related to decreased intake of protein and fat," the authors wrote. The study, published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Assn., was conducted by researchers from the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University, the University of Minnesota and the University of Texas, Austin. Roan, Shari, et al. "Perils of Meat-Free Teen Diet." Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA). 05 Apr 2009: A2. SIRS Researcher. Web. 24 May 2010. Source 4: The Case Against Meat. This article looks at the impact of the meat-producing industry on the environment. The author examines the possibility of turning to vegetarianism to solve these problems.
"There has never been a better time for environmentalists to become vegetarians. Evidence of the environmental impacts of a meat-based diet is piling up at the same time its health effects are becoming better known."
While it is true that many animals graze on land that would be unsuitable for cultivation, the demand for meat has taken millions of productive acres away from farm inventories. The cost of that is incalculable. As Diet For a Small Planet author Frances Moore Lappe writes, imagine sitting down to an eight-ounce steak. "Then imagine the room filled with 45 to 50 people with empty bowls in front of them. For the 'feed cost' of your steak, each of their bowls could be filled with a full cup of cooked cereal grains."
Harvard nutritionist Jean Mayer estimates that reducing meat production by just 10% in the US would free enough grain to feed 60 million people. Authors Paul and Anne Ehrlich note that a pound of wheat can be grown with 60 pounds of water, whereas a pound of meat requires 2,500 to 6,000 pounds.
Energy-intensive US factory farms generated 1.4 billion tons of animal waste in 1996, which, the Environmental Protection Agency reports, pollutes American waterways more than all other industrial sources combined. Meat production has also been linked to severe erosion of billions of acres of once-productive farmland and to the destruction of rainforests.
The much-publicized 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska dumped 12 million gallons of oil into Prince Willian Sound, But the relatively unknown 1995 New River hog waste spill in North Carolina poured 25 million gallons of excrement and urine into the water, killing an estimated 10 to 14 million fish and closing 364,000 acres of coastal shellfishing beds. Hog waste spills have caused the rapid spread of a virulent microbe called Pfiesteria piscicida, which has killed a billion fish in North Carolina alone.
"We definitely take up more environmental space when we eat meat," says Barbara Bramble of the National Wildlife Federation. "I think it's consistent with environmental values to eat lower on the food chain."
The factory-farmed chicken, cow or pig of today is among the most medicated creatures on Earth. According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report, the use of antimicrobial drugs for nontherapeutic purposes mainly to increase factory farm growth rates has risen 50% since 1985. Drugs are used to reduce stress levels in animals crowded together unnaturally, although 20% of the chickens die of stress or disease anyway.
Up to 60% of chickens spold in supermarkets is infected with Salmonella entenidis, which can be passed to humans if the meat is not heated to a high enough temperature. Another pathogen, Campylopacter can also spread from chickens to human beings with deadly results.
The family farm of the ninieteenth century, with its "free range" animas running around the farmyard or grazing in a pasture, is largely a thing of he past. Brutality to animals has become routine in today's factory farm.
Male chicks born on factory farms as many as 280 million per year are simply thrown into garbage bags to die because they're of no economic value as meat or eggs. Some 95% of factory-raised animals are moved by truck, where they are typically subjected to overcrowding, severe weather, hunger and thirst. Many animals die of heat exhaustion or freezing during transport.
Some of the worst abuse occurs at the end of the animals' lives, as documented by Gail Eisnitz' book Slaughterhouse, which includes interviews with slaughterhouse workers. "On the farm where I work," reports one employee, "they drag the live ones who can't stand up anymore out of the crate. They put a metal snare around her ear or foot and drag her the full length of the building. These animals are sccreaming in pain." He adds, "The slaughtering part doesn't bother me. It's the way they're treated when they're alive." Dying animals unable to walk are tossed into the "downer pile," and many suffer agonies until, after one or two days, they are finally killed.
In the U.S., according to a 1998 Vegetarian Journal survey, 82% of vegetarians are motivated by health concerns, 75% by etics, the environment and/or animal rights, 31% because of taste and 26% because of economics.
Although meat is rich in protein, Vegetarian and Vegan FAQ reports that other good sources are potatoes, whole wheat bread, rice, broccoli, spinach, almonds, peas, chickpeas, peanut butter,tofu, soymilk, lentils and kale.
Motavalli, Jim. "The Case Against Meat." E Magazine. Jan./Feb. 2002: 26-33. SIRS Researcher. Web. 25 May 2010. Difference between a vegetarian diet and a vegan diet: A vegetarian diet is a broad category diet that is based on plant food. A vegetarian does not eat meat, including: red meat, game, poultry, fish, crustacea, shellfish, and products of animal slaughter.
A vegan diet is exclusively plant foods meaning people won't eat any foods or products that come from animals and some people won't eat honey because it comes from bees. Source 4: The Vegan Food Pyramid. http://theriverreporter.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/vegan-pyramid-800x600.jpg Is a vegetarian diet better than a diet that includes meat? Go meat !!!! 19.6% of current vegetarians & 20.9% of former vegetarians use:


some form of extreme, unhealthy weight-control behaviors by using:




a diet pill inducing vomiting

laxatives
21.1% of current vegetarians & 16% of former vegetarians said they had binged on food with a loss of control. Kaayla Daniel "Children will grow better on a high-quality omnivorous diet." "Human teeth and digestive systems prove we were designed to eat both animal and vegetable foods." "Vegan diets often lead to serious deficiencies of vitamins, minerals, fatty acids and amino acids, which puts vegan children at risk for malnutrition, digestive distress, allergies and immune system breakdown." Eating disorders Current adolescent and young adult vegetarians are at risk for binge eating with loss of control.






awareness of food intake in general among practicing vegetarians eating and feeling a loss of control self-imposed restrictions of certain foods a decrease intake of protein and fat use of antimicrobial drugs for no therapeutic purposes
use of drugs to reduce stress levels in animals crowded together unnaturally
Salmonella entenidis
Campylopacter Go vegetables !! "Older people who eat large amounts of red meat and processed meats face a greater risk of deathfrom heart disease and cancer." (Lots of Red Meat Increases The Risk of Mortality) Brutality to animals has become routine in today's factory farm :(

"Male chicks born on factory farms as many as 280 million per year are simply thrown into garbage bags to die because they're of no economic value as meat or eggs. Some 95% of factory-raised animals are moved by truck, where they are typically subjected to overcrowding, severe weather, hunger and thirst. Many animals die of heat exhaustion or freezing during transport." (The Case Against Meat) The impact of the meat-producting industry on the environment. In 1996, energy-intensive US factory farms produced: 1.4 billion tons of animal waste erosion of billions of acres of once-productive farmland destruction to rainforests Conclusion: "A vegetarian diet can be healthy if it's done intelligently." (Elizabeth Turner) "Meat should be a supporting actor on the plate, not the main character." (Politi)
Host of reasons for going meat-free: personal taste, concerns about animal treatment, environmental questions surrounding livestock, and the influence of peers and celebrities.
Full transcript