Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Boot Camp Resumes and Cover Letters

CDMA
by

Julie Hauber

on 28 January 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Boot Camp Resumes and Cover Letters

Know that its purpose is to create a positive first impression by highlighting the most important information in introducing yourself to an employer.
Use effective writing and proper grammar.
Address your letter to the correct person and company!!
Explain why you are writing and how you learned of the opportunity.
Identify what you will bring to their organization.
Project confidence and show interest.
Match the formatting of your resume.
Target it to your purpose!
ASK FOR AN INTERVIEW!
Cover Letter Outline
What do they have in common?
What differences do they have?
*
C
»
r
+
Å
¡
Z
{
Y

FORMATTING
*
.
-OR-
Resume - Education
Resume - Objective
Resume - Heading
Resume - Experience
Creating Effective Job Descriptions
Begin sentences with action verbs (created, maintained, organized). Don't use "I" or "Duties included..."
Get to the point. Avoid being repetitive.
Provide specific examples (STAR).
QUANTIFY accomplishments and responsibilities.
Include industry-specific terms (but be sure you are using these correctly).
Be consistent with verb tenses, how you're formatting, etc.
Include numbers wherever possible (people supervised, money handled, etc.)
Who would you hire?
Do this
Standard Format!
Makes it easy for employers to find information.
You want to stand out using your great experience, not with scented paper, confetti, or

MYTH: There is a PERFECT resume style

Resumes are subjective documents
Friends, parents, professors, classmates, family, pastors, employers, recruiters, CEOs, mayors, doctors, etc. – ALL will have an opinion
Standards are not styles
Generally held practices are not styles
Use your head when writing a resume
Formats are standard; styles may vary
Within the basic formats, there is room for flexibility - most important info goes first
Keep style professional and classic - nothing flashy
Include your full name
Most nicknames are not appropriate
List street adress, city, state and zip code
Permanent and school address if you choose
List a telephone number
Cell phone is OK
Remember to change outgoing message
List professional e-mail
name@tulane.edu or professional non-school address
and
remove hyperlink
A targeted, brief description of the kind of job you are seeking
Like the thesis sentence in a paragraph
Change Objective to match job posting
Gear to the specific kind of job you want:
Research Analyst
Sales Representative
Museum Internship

Objective Examples

Seeking a position where I can use my education and background to enhance the organizational culture and success of a company.
Sales in Marketing and Communications
Leader in a team who focuses on diversity and advertising with a continual employee improvement program so that I can end this run-on sentence and let you move on to the next applicant.
Seeking a full-time position related to brand development and market expansion
To obtain an entry-level position in client development and communications planning
Seeking an internship in biological research with an emphasis on DNA sequencing

List all degrees you have
received or are currently pursuing
Include high school only if you graduated within the last 12 months
List minor(s), concentrations, significant presentations, independent research, reports, and group projects
GPA - overall and/or in major
List the 3-4 most relevant paid, volunteer, and internship jobs you have held during the last 1-5 years.
Start with the most recent & move back
Currently working there = present tense
Not working there anymore = past tense
Create a bulleted list or paragraph:
Show results, accomplishments, & promotions
Be specific, concrete, and concise
Indicate how you heard about the position and the position title
Hiring managers don’t have time for fluff
Get to the point
Include all necessary information
Make the connection
Paragraph 1 - The Opening

Other things to avoid...
Do not add colors or designs
Do not include your picture
Do not lie or stretch the truth

Resume Summary

To sum up . . .

Cover Letter Summary

It
highlights
the most important things for
an employer to know about you.

On the other hand,

Activity:

"Who Would
YOU
Interview?"



Does the
shoe fit?
Also . . . Specific Formats
CV’s, Performing Arts, Government
MYTH: Resumes need to be on one page

Reflect your level of experience
Most new college graduates will only need one page
More experience = more pages
Content is most important
Whatever the Style...

Most important information at the top
One page
Font style
Present vs Past tense
Dates
Locations
Details matter!
Who would
you hire?

Write it down:
Accomplishments and honors
Companies, clubs, in-depth research or writing projects, and organizations - including volunteer work
What you have learned in each role
How the employer, organization, or community benefited
Keep a master list
SHARE
EXERCISE: What are your top selling points?
How do others describe you?
What are you proud of?
What challenges have you overcome?
Why did you select Tulane?
What feedback have you received from others? teachers, professors, and supervisors?
PAIR
THINK
TIP
Before you write your resume (your assignment): BRAINSTORM!
Not this
Tip:
Use the great Resume Writing handout we have for you!


Identify the position again
If you have additional skills that you want to mention, make sure they are not general
Indicate generally when you can be called…not when you will call them (sounds threatening)


Make the connection with your previous jobs
Talk about specifics and not just skills that every employee has
This is your chance to outline the top reasons why you're worthy of an interview!
Points in mind on cover letters:

You should
customize
your cover letter for
each
employer
Make sure you display how you can meet their needs
Sell your “true” self without selling the “perfect” vision of yourself
Keep it Simple (K.I.S.?.)
Paragraph 2 -
The Commercial
Paragraph 3 -
The Closing
Your Career Documents

Resumes
Cover Letters
Written Correspondence
References
Writing or Other Sample(s)
Transcript
Tip:
Put a decent amount of time and effort into creating your foundational documents at the beginning of your job search. You will be able to generate applications more easily going forward.
Objectives

Create an effective resume using standard resume conventions
Write a cover letter that will get an employer's attention and get you an interview

Activity:
"Who Would YOU Interview?"


Assignments:
Resume and Cover Letter with Job Posting
Due: x/xx in class

What went
on it?
Did you use
a template?
Have you
ever written
a resume?
What did you
use it for?
Resume
Serves as a personal advertisement
Shows that you can create well-formatted, error-free documents
Displays your communication skills and professionalism
Makes you
not
be an easy no
Gets you an interview!!
*The purpose of the resume is to obtain an
interview, not to get the job.
Defn:
a brief, informative summary of your professional skills, accomplishments, experiences, and education

A twelve-page history of everything you've ever done
A job application
A position paper on why they should hire you and not the other person
A resume . . .
A resume is NOT . . .
View examples of resumes on the document projector (20 sec each)
Getting
started...
Writing a Resume
Know the Dos and Don'ts
Make yourself competitive
Get the interview
Provide first example of written skills
Identify your accomplishments easily
Keep descriptions brief and to the point
Use phrases that are numerical in nature
How much did you handle in cash?
How many people did you supervise?
How many customers per shift?
List examples of how you made a difference at the company
Not just "I'm a people person and like to make people happy." (They can hire a golden retriever if that's the case.)
Additional sections you might have
Honors, including honors program and thesis
Activities
Scholarships
Study abroad
Significant papers
Courses with a practical/internship component
Begin sentences with action verbs (created, maintained, organized). Don't use "I" or "Duties included..."
Get to the point. Avoid being repetitive.
Provide specific examples.
QUANTIFY accomplishments and responsibilities.
Include industry-specific terms (but be sure you are using these correctly).
Be consistent with verb tenses, how you're formatting, etc.
Include numbers wherever possible (people supervised, money handled, etc.)
List the 3-4 most relevant paid, volunteer, and internship jobs from the last 1-5 years.
Start with the most recent & move back
Currently working there = present tense
Not working there anymore = past tense
Create a bulleted list or paragraph:
Show results, accomplishments, & promotions
Be specific, concrete, and concise
Include your full name
Most nicknames are not appropriate
List street address, city, state and zip code
Permanent and school address if you choose
List a telephone number
Cell phone is OK
Remember to change outgoing message
List professional e-mail
name@tulane.edu or professional non-school address
and
remove hyperlink
Could include
Computer
List the names & versions of all software programs you know well
Include the URL’s for any relevant web pages you have designed
Using Google, email, or the web is not considered a “skill”
Languages
Interests
Do not list hobbies: skiing, sailing, salsa dancing, traveling, skating, shopping, earring collecting, donating blood, anything dealing with Star Wars, Twilight, or Harry Potter
List all degrees you have
received or are currently pursuing
Include high school only if you graduated within the last 12 months
List minor(s), concentrations, significant presentations, independent research, reports, and group projects
GPA - overall and/or in major
Start your
career climb
Kick it up
Freeman
Format
Ughh!
Myths!
Once you create a resume, you're done

The more places you post and the more jobs you apply to = the greater your chances

Employers read everything on the resume

Employers will discuss your resume in the interview

Hobbies, interests will get you an interview
Positive
First
Impression
Cover
Letter
Make it
Ducky
Now that you are a resume expert, how would you edit this one? (under document projector in class)
Wrap-Up
Cover Letter Basics
Formal Business Letter Style
Contact Information-Yours
Date
Contact Information-Company
One page
Present vs Past tense
Avoid
Do not add colors or designs
Do not lie or stretch the truth
Do not copy examples
Do not copy course info
Content
Focus on employers' needs and requirements
Be consise
Ask for what you want (interview)
Quantify/Details/Examples
Thank the reader
Things to Remember
Double check spelling and grammar--PROOFREAD!
Use your own words
Sell yourself--Make it your chance to stand out
Show your knowledge (of company/industry)
Use their terms (match job desciption with your skills and experience)
Address to hiring manager/recruiter
Use examples as a guide
Include all campus or community activities
Currently involved or in the past
List memberships in professional organizations
Good example of using quantitative information and results in an Activities bullet:
Full transcript