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WHAT ARE EFFECTIVE ORAL ERROR CORRECTION STRATEGIES FOR THE

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Jen Santamaria

on 17 November 2014

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Transcript of WHAT ARE EFFECTIVE ORAL ERROR CORRECTION STRATEGIES FOR THE

WHAT ARE EFFECTIVE CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK STRATEGIES FOR THE IMMERSION CLASSROOM?
Corrective Feedback: The literature
Corrective Feedback entails various strategies a teacher may use to help students produce fewer oral errors.
It's your turn to provide CF
Findings

- ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) proficiency guidelines

“Advanced-level speakers have sufficient control of basic structures”.
Immersion teacher
Literature
While learners demonstrate native-like competences in listening comprehension, reading skills and overall confidence in L2 production,
they generally lag behind native speakers in productive skills such as writing and speaking.
Immersion students are know for making rudimentary errors throughout their K-12 education. (see Swain, 1985; Genesee, 1987; Lyster & Ranta, 2007).
Cautions of CF
Krashen (1985) and Terrell (1977) claim that
some modes
of oral feedback can cause
anxiety
,
break the communicative flow,
and
remain ambiguous
for students notice.
It is not a matter of will you correct, but how...
Many SLA researchers (e.g. Lyster, 2001; 2002; Ellis 2007; Lyster & Saito 2010; Lyster & Ranta, 2012) affirm that within a communicative context,
Corrective Feedback is beneficial to the L2 leaner.
What type of CF works best?


Types of corrective feedback and a balanced approach
Know what Errors to Correct:
Know the Individual


Teachers should be aware and prepared to vary
who,

when
and
how
they correct errors in accordance with the cognitive and affective needs of the individual learner, (see Stein 1999, Ellis, 2009; Lyndon, 2011).


Krashen (1985) argues CF should be
limited
to language features that are
simple and transferable
(rules of thumb or rules that result in pattern).

Known grammatical
features or features that learners have shown they have
repetitive problems
with (Shrum & Gleason, 2005; Ellis, 2009).


Qualitative Methods
Three types of data collection procedures were implemented in this case study, observation by...

(1) recordings
(2) field notes
(3) and a reflective journal
- Third grade Spanish immersion program

- 6 students of mixed abilities

- NWEA scores in language arts ranged from the 21st to the 97th percentile

- Spanish reading fluency, measured on a grade level passage, ranges from below grade level to above grade level.

Setting & Participants
A combined CF approach, as suggested by Lyster (2004) and Ding (2012), was implemented.

- language abilities
- type of error they produced (known or unknown grammatical syntax)
Treatment Plan
Results
The CF Menu ¡Buen provecho!
After implementing
focus on form
we need to
hold students accountable
for their language
accuracy.



Turn and Talk: What do you know about correcting students when they make oral errors?
Implications...
What are some challenges to finding the ideal amount of support (scaffolding)?

How do your empower your students to correct one another?

What did you learn today that you foresee yourself implementing in your classroom?

What questions or 'I wonders' do you have?


CF Flow Chart
Activity:

Situation 1:
5th grade immersion students. Weak L2 skills, this is basic error.

"Yo me gusta chocolate también."

Situation 2:
1st grade immersion student. High L2 skills, this is an unknown error.

"Esta mañana mi mamá diji que no puedo ir
afuera hoy."


Teacher- correct the student based on the CF flow chart.

Role Play
Create situations based on what you observe in your classroom.

1. Pair up

2. Decide on the context (language level and type of error), then refer to the CF flow chart

3. Take turns role playing teacher and student

- Student commits error
- Teacher provided corrective feedback

4. Reflect on your decisions
How does "knowing the individual" play a role in correction?
Don't overwhelm. Be purposeful.

How do you correct your students errors in...

...reading?

...behavior?
When
students make errors
in their
spoken language and a

teacher provides a correction
,
it is known as corrective feedback.
Establish awareness (Lyster, 2007)

Balance (Krashen,1977)

Know your students (Lyster, 2002; Landtolf & Poehner 2010; Ding, 2012)

(1) Does the student understand their error?
(2) Does the student have strong or weak L2 language abilities?
(3) Is this a common error?
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