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Sonnet 74

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by

Connor Fitzhugh

on 28 February 2014

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Transcript of Sonnet 74

Sonnet 74
Analysis
Red: Monosyllabic

The Bubonic Plague
The Attire for a Plague Doctor
Conclusion
Introduction
As writers, we will always live on in our works.

The pen is mightier than the sword(?)
Don’t be sad when death takes me where I'll finally be free. I'll still live in this poem, which you’ll always have to remember me by. When you reread this, you’ll remember me. My body will die, but my spirit, the better part of me, is yours. So when I’m dead and you have my body—the "dregs" of my life, what worms eat, the only only thing that was killed, the part not worth remembering. The only important thing about my body was my spirit, but now my spirit lives in this poem, forever yours.
Sonnet 74
But be contended when that fell arrest
Without all bail shall carry me away;
My life hath in this line some interest,
Which for memorial still with thee shall stay.
When thou reviewest this, thou doust review
The very part which consecrate to thee.
The earth shall have but earth, which is his due;
My spirit is thine, the better part of me.
So then thou hast but lost the dregs of life,
The prey of worms, by body being dead,
The coward conquest of a wretch's knife,
Too based of thee to be rememb'red
The worth of that is that which it contains
And that is this, and this with thee remains.

But
be contended when that fell arrest (10)
Without
a
ll b
ai
l sh
a
ll c
a
rry me
a
w
a
y; (10)
My life hath in this line some interest, (10)
Which for memorial
s
till wi
th th
ee shall stay. (11)
When thou reviewes
t t
his, thou doust review (10)
The very part which consecrate to thee. (10)
The earth shall have but earth, which is his due; (10)
My spirit is thine, the better part of me. (10)
So
then thou hast but lost the dregs of life, (10)
The prey of worms, by body being dead, (10)
The coward conquest of a wretch's knife, (10)
Too based of thee to be rememb'red (9)
The worth of
that
is
that
which it contains (10)
And
that
is
this
, and
this
with thee remains. (10)
Purple: Small words
Assonance and Alliteration
Yellow: Repetition
Green: Theory of Separation
As writers, we forever live on in our works.
England: Where Shakespeare lived
Dregs - worthless part of something, impurity, corrupt matter
Iambic Pentameter
Full transcript