Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Learning Theories

No description
by

Brenda Cudmore

on 22 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Learning Theories

LEARNING THEORIES
BEHAVIORISM
CONSTRUCTIVISM
Definition:
"Explanations of learning that focus one external events as the cause of changes in observable behavior"
(Woolfolk et al., 2009)
Assumption
Learner is an Empty Vessel
COGNITIVISM
Definition:
"A general approach that views learning as an active mental process of acquiring, remembering, and using knowledge"
(Woolfolk et al., 2009)
Assumption
Learner is an Empty Vessel
Definition:
Emphasizes the active role of the learner in building understanding and making sense of information
(Woolfolk et al., 2009)
Assumption
Learner is NOT an Empty Vessel
LIMITATIONS
Behavioralism, Cognitivism, Constructivism
Concerned with learning process not value of content being learned
Central Tenant: "Learning occurs inside a person"
Do not acknowledge how "learning occurs outside of people (i.e. learning that is stored and manipulated by technology"
Do not acknowledge "how learning occurs within organizations"
TECHNOLOGY
A 21st CENTURY LEARNING TOOL

How does technology change the way we learn?
AN ALTERNATIVE
THEORY

Individuals learn in a Linear Fashion
PRINCIPLES
OF
CONNECTIVISM
Definition:
"Connectivism is the integration of principles explored by chaos, network, and complexity and self-organization theories." Information is always changing and as a result " not entirely under the control of the individual." "Learning can reside outside of ourselves" (Siemens, 2004).

CONNECTIVISM
"Learning and knowledge rests in diversity of opinions"
"Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources"
(Siemens, 2004)
(Siemens, 2004)
"Learning may reside in non-human appliances"
(Siemens, 2004)
"Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known"
(Siemens, 2004)
Ability to
think and
connect
What
is
known
"Nurturing and maintaining connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a
core skill"
"Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a
core skill"
(Siemens, 2004)
(Siemens, 2004)
"Currency (accurate up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities"
"Decision-making is itself a learning process."
(Siemens, 2004)
"Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision."
(Siemens, 2004)
(Siemens, 2004)
CONCLUSIONS
The medium we obtain information from is more important than the known content
"Connectivism provides insight into learning skills and tasks needed for learners to flourish in a digital era." (Siemens, 2004)
"...A model of learning that acknowledges the tectonic shifts in society where learning is no longer an internal, individualistic activity. How people work and function is altered when new tools are utilized." (Siemens, 2004).
We are able to locate a source of information if the knowledge needed is not already known
References
Siemens, G. (2004, December 12). Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. elearnspace
everything elearning.. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.htm

Woolfolk, A., Winne, P., Perry, N., & Shapka, J. (2009). Educational Psychology. Toronto: Pearson
Education Canada. (Original work published 2006)


THE END
A B. Cudmore Presentation
Full transcript