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Percy Jackson vs. The Odyssey

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Jessica Twitmyer

on 5 March 2014

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Transcript of Percy Jackson vs. The Odyssey

Calypso
The Oracle of Delphi
The Athena
Parthenos
The Land of The Cyclopes
Conclusion
Overall, both Percy Jackson and Odysseus were heroes with faults which made them intriguing and relatable to. They also both had various accomplices in their journeys and were valued greatly in their homes.
Percy Jackson vs. The Odyssey
(and other myths)

The Suitors
Odysseus
Percy Jackson
Odysseus
Percy Jackson
In the Odyssey, Odysseus returns home to find suitors trying to take over his home. At the site of this, Odysseus gathers his men, his two servants and son Telemachus, and fight off the suitors killing them all. Before the mass murder, he tells his servants to tell the women to lock their doors and not come out.

In the final book,
The Last Olympian
, Percy returns to his hometown Manhattan. While here he has to defend Olympus, or the Empire State building, from Kronos and his army of monsters. He decides to leave his mom and step-father to find safety while he and his friends go and fight off the army on Olympus.
After his ship is battered by the ferocious storm of Poseidon, he washes up on the island of Calypso. He is infatuated with her and ends up staying for 7 whole years! Eventually, Athena (his protector) convinces Zeus to let him leave. He grants her request and tells Calypso that she must release Odysseus. Odysseus then builds a raft and is given food and wine before returning to his homeland.
This isn’t the first time that this has happened to Odysseus. When he went to Circe’s island, his crew had to remind him of his goals and values. With Calypso, however, no one was there to “splash water in his face.”
One of the gods send Percy to Ogygia, giving him time to heal, while possibly also distracting him. He is cared for by Calypso and they become fond of each other. She doesn’t know much of the outside world because her island is a comfortable prison. She lives there as punishment for supporting her father in the first war.
Eventually, Hephaestus stops by and gives Percy the choice to leave and save his friends or stay and live with Calypso. He obviously decides to leave because there are many more books about his adventures.
Myth
The Oracle of Delphi was Pythia, the priestess at the temple of Apollo. People came from all over to visit the oracle to get their questions answered. The answers could inform people on many different subjects like, from who would win the war to whether or not their crop would grow that season. Often times the response would be somewhat ambiguous, and the people would misinterpret the meaning of the oracle. Overall, the Oracle of Delphi was a very important shrine in ancient Greece and influenced the ways of many people.

Percy Jackson
Odysseus
In the Odyssey, Odysseus ventures into a mysterious cave out of curiosity. During his trip, Odysseus and his best men became hostage to the mighty cyclops, Polyphemus. The cyclops begins to eat Odysseus's men, so he and some of his men stab Polyphemus in the eye. They did not want to kill the cyclops because they still needed to get out of the cage. Odysseus tells the cyclops his name was nobody and then surreptitiously escaped under the bellies of sheep. When Odysseus and his men sail away, Odysseus tells Polyphemus his real name, endangering his crew and himself.
Leadership Comparison
Leadership Comparison
Leadership Comparison
Comparison With Odysseus
When Odysseus goes to the underworld to seek help it
is similar to the Oracle of Delphi. Odysseus goes to the
underworld to seek help from Tiresias, who can see the future. Percy Jackson goes to the oracle to find out the future or get a quest. This is one way Percy Jackson can relate to the Odyssey.

In Percy Jackson, the Oracle is a dead corpse that still speaks to give the future. The oracle only gives out prophecies and quests. These can also have more than one meaning, making it hard to understand what she meant by what she said. The first time that Percy talked to the oracle was to receive a prophecy and a quest. These prophecies were not handed out very often. The oracle was also used in other Percy Jackson books like the "Sea of Monsters" when Clarise received a quest to find the golden fleece. The oracle was used little and only when it was important, but it helped them complete their duties.
In order to leave, both Odysseus and Percy Jackson
required interference from a god. However, Zeus forced
Calypso to let Odysseus go and Hephaestus gave Percy
the decision. At the same time, they both sailed
away from her on only a raft and Odysseus'
certainly go "wherever he wanted it to."
In both the Odyssey and in Percy Jackson, the leaders, Odysseus and Percy, are both defending their home. Also, both of them keep the people who can't help them out of the fight, such as the women in the Odyssey and Percy's parents.
Original
Percy Jackson
In Percy Jackson, Percy heads to this island fully knowing of Polyphemus' presence. He heads to this island to retrieve the golden fleece, the very one Jason went to retrieve. This fleece would be able to save the dying tree of Thalia. He also had to save his best friend, Grover. While on this island he meets a similar problem to Odysseus. However unlike Odysseus, Percy was trying to find his way inside. In order to gain entry, the had to use trickery. He climbed on the bottom of one of Polyphemus' sheep. Luckily for Percy, Annabeth distracted Polyphemus with a Nobody disguise. Once
in, they took the fleece and rescued Grover. Quickly after, they
esaped with the fleece and returned to Camp Half-Blood.
The Parthenon's main function was to house the Athena Parthenos. The builder of such a grand statue was Pheidias, and was supposedly built in 438 B.C.E. The statue is said to be 9 to 11 meters tall. Sadly it has not survived to this day, but we have had access to enough replicas to know about its appearance and qualities. In Athena's right hand is Nike, which she is giving to the people of Athens. On her breastplate is the head of Medusa.
Percy Jackson
Both Odysseus and Percy believed that killing Polyphemus was
a poor idea. So in order to gain what they need, (escaping or entering), they used trickery, sheep, and Nobody. Both stories also saved somebody. In the Odyssey it was Odysseus' men. In Percy Jackson it was Grover and Clarrise.
In Percy Jackson, the Athena Parthenos plays a major component in the story. The Athena Parthenos is said to be the reason why Greeks and Romans hate each other so much, (not historically accurate.) In order to bring peace and defeat mother earth (a.k.a. Gaia), the Greeks and Romans must band together. The Athena Parthenos is what is theoretically supposed to rebuild the ties between the Greeks and Romans. It is also said to emit a huge amount of aura, which does attract monsters later on.
Citations
Grant, Michael. Myths of the Greeks and Romans. First ed. Cleveland: The World Publishing Company, 1962. Print.
Nevins, Jessie. "The Oracle at Delphi". Ashes2Art. 2007. Web. 1 March, 2014
<http://www.coastal.edu/ashes2art/delphi2/misc-essays/oracle_of_delphi.html>
Riordan, Rick. Battle of the Labyrinth. First ed. New York: Hyperion Books for Children, 2008. Print.
Sakoulas, Thomas. "Chryselephantine statue of Athena" Ancient-Greece. Web. 1 March, 2014.
Riordan, Rick. The Sea of Monsters. First ed. New York: Hyperion Books for Children, 2006. Print.
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