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taoism project

Santana Poole, Wesley Hamilton,mclaine Dickey
by

santana poole

on 28 November 2011

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Transcript of taoism project

TAOISM! History! Diffusion! Archiecture! Current Issues! Taoism started out in China but then it started to diffuse and move out. It was very much related to Confucius and so they are often found in the same region. Even a single individual might believe parts of both of them. The thing is even though it originated in China it was banned by the Communist in China 1949 but is still practice there and it is legal in Taiwan. This religion is commonly used in Taiwan and the US. But there is not really just one culture where Taoism is practiced. Diffusion! Fundamentals!
Current Issues! Archiecture!

Taoist architecture mainly refers to the Taoist temple buildings, which basically consist of the divine hall, the alter, the room for reading sculptures and practicing asceticism, the living room, the reception room for pilgrims, and the park where visitors can have a rest. The general layout adopts the form of Chinese traditional courtyard, with the divine hall on the mean axis and the reception room and Taoists' living room, etc., on both sides. Together with a park cleverly built on the basis of the architectural complex, a kind of fairyland thus comes into being.

Taoist temple buildings also clearly reflect Taoists' strong will in the pursuit of happiness, longevity and immortality.

The existing Taoist architectures were mostly built in the periods of the Ming and Qing dynasties (1368-1911). Some important buildings have been listed as the national or provincial key cultural relics under special protection. As a kind of precious inheritance, their design, layout and craftsmanship are still worthy of borrowing in modern architecture.
History! Fundamentals!
People who practice the religion Taosim believe that is it a philosophy on how to live correctly . Their believes came from the writings of Chuang Tzu (250 bc) and Lao Tzo (6th BC). Taosim is a comtemporary version of confuscioms. It is also know as Daosim. Daoism can be translated into the "Way" or "Path". They believe that only by avoidance of daily activites and introsepection can a person live in harmony with the principals that underline and govern the underline the universe. They don't believe in segragation like Islam does with the caste system. They say if you follow this path it will eliminate unhappines and conflict and facilitates achievement. Those who believe in it are neither monotheist/polythest because they don't really believe in a god. They say that you need to align yourself with the universal forces and so universalizing is very important. This religion encourages people to let things run there course and not to resist the tendency to work things out but to just relax and let things run the natural way. Rooted in the ancient Chinese systems of beliefs, influenced by primitive shamanism and observation of natural cycles, Taoism recognises Laozi as its founder and Zhuangzi as one of its most brillant representatives. Early Taoism developed as an original answer to the bitter debates during the philosophically fertile time of the Hundred Schools of Thought, corresponding to the Warring States period. It was a time of seemingly endless warfare and chaos. This turbulent era gave rise to a kind of naturalistic quietism in accordance with the "process" of the universe: Tao. Action through inaction (wei wu wei), the power of emptiness, detachment, receptiveness, spontaneity, the strength of softness, the relativism of human values and the search for a long life, are some of its preferred themes.

Taoism is rooted in the oldest belief systems of China, dating from a time when shamanism and pantheism were prevalent. Elements of primitive Taoist thought include the cyclic progression of seasons, growth and death of sentient beings and their endless generation and questions about the origin of life. Observation of natural processes lead to divination pratices where the operator tries to detect opportunities in natural phenomenons (like crackles made in bones).

The oldest Chinese scripture is said to be the I Ching, a compilation of readings based on sixty-four hexagrams. The hexagrams are combinations of eight trigrams or gua, (collectively called bagua), resulting in sixty-four possible combinations. Laozi was intimately familiar with the I Ching, and the Tao Te Ching shows that he was profoundly inspired by it. The Huang-Lao Tradition(1) flourished after the Magic and Immortality Tradition(2). Later integrated into Daoism, it constitutes an important component of the religious background to the birth of Daoism. The Huang-Lao Tradition is a product of the marriage of Huang-Lao philosophy with the Immortalist(3) practises of the Magic and Immortality Tradition.


Huang-Lao philosophy emerged in the Qi state during the middle of the Warring States period (475-221 BC). It emphasized the cultivation of virtue as advocated by the Yellow Emperor and Laozi. By the early Han dynasty (206 BC - AD 24), the mainstream of Huang-Lao thought concerned itself with the Art of Government(4) and with Yin-Yang studies, but also included Immortalism. During the reign of the Han emperor Wu, the Magicians(5) reinterpreted the Yellow Emperor's teachings, to the point of completely merging them with Immortalist thought, so that the Immortalist Tradition(6) came to be associated with the Yellow Emperor.

As Huang-Lao philosophy flourished in the Qi state, where the Immortalists were also most active, the two schools developed in the same environment, mutually influenced each other, and finally assimulated to form the Huang-Lao Tradition. This mutual integration was a long process which took place in three stages.

The first stage occurred when the Han emperor Wu gave exclusive patronage to Confucianism, leading the Huang-Lao and Immortalist schools to come closer together. The second phase occured from the reign of Han emperor Xuan to the end of the Western Han dynasty (AD 24). Emperor Xuan approved of Huang - Lao philosophy, and allowed the Magic and Immortality Tradition to flourish. During the third phase, the two currents merged to form the Huang-Lao Tradition in the reign of emperor Huan of the Eastern Han dynasty (AD 147-167).

During the reigns of emperors Ming and Zhang of the Eastern Han dynasty, the Huang-Lao Tradition had already become popular in the Imperial Court, and by the time of emperor Huan it was recorded in the official histories. In the Story of Wang Huan in the History of the Later Han, it is recorded that emperor Huan (reigned AD 158-167) patronized the Huang-Lao Tradition and ordered the destruction of the old sacrificial halls. After emperor Huan openly recognized the Huang-Lao Tradition, he sent officials twice a year to Laozi's ancestral shrine at Ku Xian, and to the Yellow Emperor's Guanlong Hall, marking the final stage of the formation of the Huang-Lao Tradition.

During the reign of emperor Ling, Zhang Jiao, founder of the Supreme Peace Tradition(7), gave himself the title of Great Virtuous Master(8) , affiliated himself to the Huang-Lao Tradition, took disciples and was honoured by the common people.

During the period of integration of Huang-Lao philosophy with the Magic and Immortality Tradition, there was a strong wave effect of magicalized Confucianism, leading the literary school of Esoteric Speculations 9 to stimulate the formation of the Huang-Lao Tradition.
Like the Magic and Immortality Tradition, the Huang-Lao Tradition did not have systematic teachings or religious doctrines, nor did it have a religious organization. But it was the predecessor to Daoism; without understanding the Huang-Lao Tradition, it is impossible to come to a full knowledge of the history of Daoism.

In todays age there are approimantly 225 million followers who are of both genders and many ages. Those followers goal is to harmonize themselves with the Tao. It is very close to confucianism and so they often interlink, so they will be found in the same in the same people. They are not the most popular religion to worship but there are some people in Asia primarily that believe in it. Even thought asians are the most common people who believe in it there is no certain language or place that it is worshiped. It is not spreading really fast like Islam but it is still a fairly popular religion. On the very idea that philosophical Taoists venerate the non-useful, this is pure revisionist poppycock.
The Taoist sees the use in what most would consider as useless.

The lesson of the empty vessel is one of great import.A Clear mind comes from the wonderful fundamental essence given us by nature and is not a personal possession. Impartiality beyond any specific culture fosters clarity and deeper seeing. It is not hard to produce wisdom... what is hard is to have wisdom not interrupted.

Thus, even though the term Tao is used of Christ in the Chinese translation of John's Gospel, we should not infer that Taoism and Christianity are really about the same thing. They are not. Christianity proclaims a personal Creator who is morally outraged by man's sinfulness and will one day judge the world in righteousness (Rom. 1:18–2:6). Taoism proclaims an impersonal creative principle which makes no moral distinction between right and wrong and which judges no one.
quotes! quotes! TAOISM! The architectural form of Taoist architecture mainly refers to the Taoist temple buildings, which basically consist of the divine hall, the alter, the room for reading sculptures and practicing asceticism, the living room, the reception room for pilgrims, and the park where / can have a rest. You could say that these temples had a lot of sacred space. The general layout adopts the form of Chinese traditional courtyard, with the divine hall on the mean axis and the reception room and Taoists' living room, etc., on both sides. Together with a park cleverly built on the basis of the architectural complex, a kind of fairyland thus comes into being. This is a fine example of traditional architecture.

Taoist temple buildings also clearly reflect Taoists' strong will in the pursuit of happiness, longevity and immortality.

The existing Taoist architectures were mostly built in the periods of the Ming and Qing dynasties (1368-1911). Some important buildings have been listed as the national or provincial key cultural relics under special protection. As a kind of precious inheritance, their design, layout and craftsmanship are still worthy of borrowing in modern architecture.
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/rs/http://www.tao.org/
http://www.taopage.org/taoism.htmlhtthttp://
www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/2001/06/What-Taoists-Believe.aspx
p://www.religioustolerance.org/taoism.htm
http://www.taoism.net/
the text book
Work Sited Architecture! Architecture!
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