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Shakespeare Analysis

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Mia Dakic

on 11 May 2013

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Transcript of Shakespeare Analysis

By: Mia Dakic Shakespeare Analysis Act 3 Scene 4 Lines 93-120 Structure Macbeth Re-enter GHOST OF BANQUO
Macbeth
Avaunt! and quit my sight! let the earth hide thee!
Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold;
Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with!
Lady Macbeth
Think of this. good peers,
But as a thing of custom: ‘tis no other;
Only it spoils the pleasure of the time. Significance The structure in these few lines is significant because they set the tone and mood.
There are many exclamation points used; this emphasizes the shock and freight in Macbeth. There are many caesuras which are there purposely to create more tension. The caesuras show the shock and fear from Macbeth and especially Lady Macbeth who was trying to restore order and pretend like there was nothing wrong, trying to make it seem less strange. In the lines you see that Macbeth uses more exclamation points than Lady Macbeth which shows how they are able to deal with the situation. By using periods for when Lady Macbeth is speaking Shakespeare tells us that Lady Macbeth is being more logical and calm than Macbeth who is shouting and loosing his mind in front of his peers. This is also significant because through the use of punctuation Shakespeare furthers characterization by showing us what mental states Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are in. Imagery Re-enter GHOST OF BANQUO
Macbeth
Avaunt! and quit my sight! let the earth hide thee!
Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold;
Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with!
Lady Macbeth
Think of this. good peers,
But as a thing of custom: ‘tis no other;
Only it spoils the pleasure of the time.
Macbeth
What man dare, I dare;
Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
The arm’d rhinoceros, or the Hycran tiger,
Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
Shall never tremble: or be alive again,
And dare me to the desert with thy sword;
If trembling I inhabit then, protest me.
The baby of a girl. Hence, horrible shadow!
Unreal mockery, hence! Body and Blood Imagery The imagery can be linked to the theme of Appearance vs Reality. The body imagery is describing a dead human being as being sat at the table, when in reality there is no one there. Shakespeare deliberately used imagery to show that he was dead without directly saying it; ex. "Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold." Body imagery is one of the main imagery's used in this section. Vicious Animal Imagery This heightens the characterization of Macbeth. Through the use of animal imagery we see that Macbeth is being courageous at this point, he is challenging the ghost of Banquo to a one on one duel. In Act 1 we saw that Macbeth isn't very courageous and that Lady Macbeth is more manly because he started acting like a coward, now the roles have somewhat turned tables. This also heightens the theme of manhood/manliness. Re-enter GHOST OF BANQUO
Macbeth
Avaunt! and quit my sight! let the earth hide thee!
Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold;
Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with!
Lady Macbeth
Think of this. good peers,
But as a thing of custom: ‘tis no other;
Only it spoils the pleasure of the time. Macbeth
What man dare, I dare;
Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
The arm’d rhinoceros, or the Hycran tiger,
Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
Shall never tremble: or be alive again,
And dare me to the desert with thy sword;
If trembling I inhabit then, protest me.
The baby of a girl. Hence, horrible shadow!
Unreal mockery, hence!
GHOST OF BANQUO vanishes
Why, so: be gone,
I am a man again. Pray you, sit still. Lady Macbeth
You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting,
With most admired disorder.
Macbeth
Can such things be,
And overcome us like a summer’s cloud,
Without our special wonder? You make me strange,
Even to the disposition that I owe,
When now I think you can behold such sights,
And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks,
When mine is blanched with fear.
Ross
What sights, my lord?
Lady Macbeth
I pray you, speak not; he grows worse and worse;
Question enrages him. At once, good night:
Stand not upon the order of your going,
But go at once,
A kind good night to all! Main themes of these lines: Guilt Appearance vs. Reality Order & Disorder Macbeth in these lines is talking to what he
sees as being Banquo, when in reality it's his
conscience that created the ghost of Banquo,
his best friend that he ordered to be killed.
The last few lines he's talking to Lady Macbeth. Takes place at Macbeths
castle during the banquet These few lines show Macbeth's
paranoia and guilt, also show Lady
Macbeth's response to them. These
lines further the characters of both
Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. We see
how much better Lady Macbeth
is at keeping herself together than
Macbeth. Also we see how these past
events, beginning with the meeting
with the witches, have affected Macbeth
and his mental state. GHOST OF BANQUO vanishes
Why, so: be gone,
I am a man again. Pray you, sit still.
Lady Macbeth
You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting,
With most admired disorder.
Macbeth
Can such things be,
And overcome us like a summer’s cloud,
Without our special wonder? You make me strange,
Even to the disposition that I owe,
When now I think you can behold such sights,
And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks,
When mine is blanched with fear. Blood Imagery- Underlined in Red
Body Imagery- Pink
Vicious Animal Imagery- Green Contrast Negative Positive Diction Macbeth
What man dare, I dare;
Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
The arm’d rhinoceros, or the Hycran tiger,
Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
Shall never tremble: or be alive again,
And dare me to the desert with thy sword;
If trembling I inhabit then, protest me.
The baby of a girl. Hence, horrible shadow!
Unreal mockery, hence! Ross
What sights, my lord?
Lady Macbeth
I pray you, speak not; he grows worse and worse;
Question enrages him. At once, good night:
Stand not upon the order of your going,
But go at once,
A kind good night to all! Mainly "!" "." "," Re-enter GHOST OF BANQUO
Macbeth
Avaunt! and quit my sight! let the earth hide thee!
Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold;
Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with!
Lady Macbeth
Think of this. good peers,
But as a thing of custom: ‘tis no other;
Only it spoils the pleasure of the time. Macbeth
What man dare, I dare;
Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
The arm’d rhinoceros, or the Hycran tiger,
Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
Shall never tremble: or be alive again,
And dare me to the desert with thy sword;
f trembling I inhabit then, protest me.
The baby of a girl. Hence, horrible shadow!
Unreal mockery, hence!
GHOST OF BANQUO vanishes
Why, so: be gone,
I am a man again. Pray you, sit still.
Lady Macbeth
You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting,
With most admired disorder. Macbeth
Can such things be,
And overcome us like a summer’s cloud,
Without our special wonder? You make me strange,
Even to the disposition that I owe,
When now I think you can behold such sights,
And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks,
When mine is blanched with fear.
Ross
What sights, my lord?
Lady Macbeth
I pray you, speak not; he grows worse and worse;
Question enrages him. At once, good night:
Stand not upon the order of your going,
But go at once,
A kind good night to all! GHOST OF BANQUO vanishes
Why, so: be gone,
I am a man again. Pray you, sit still.
Lady Macbeth
You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting,
With most admired disorder.
Macbeth
Can such things be,
And overcome us like a summer’s cloud,
Without our special wonder? You make me strange,
Even to the disposition that I owe,
When now I think you can behold such sights,
And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks,
When mine is blanched with fear.
Ross
What sights, my lord?
Lady Macbeth
I pray you, speak not; he grows worse and worse;
Question enrages him. At once, good night:
Stand not upon the order of your going,
But go at once,
A kind good night to all!
Takes place at Macbeths castle Blue- Negative Diction
Orange- Positive Diction Negative Diction
Used by Macbeth: 19
Used by Lady Macbeth: 6
Positive Diction
Used by Macbeth: 4
Used by Lady Macbeth: 8 Significance The contrast between negative and positive diction is extremely dominant. By having Lady Macbeth using more positive diction you can tell that she is in a better mental state than Macbeth because she is being logical by trying to counter all of Macbeth's negative diction. Also this heightens the theme of order and disorder; Lady Macbeth can be seen as "order" while Macbeth can be seen as "disorder". Simile "Approach thou like the rugged Russian Bear,
The arm'd rhinoceros, or the Hycran Tiger, This line is very important because through this simile we can see how Macbeth feels like he's being overpowered, this shows the loss of control. Again this is an important line because it heightens the theme of manliness/manhood. "Overcome us like a summer's cloud" Now lets take a closer look
(Pun intended because it's a magnifying glass *insert laughter*) Foreshadowing Foreshadowing is seen in line 117 when Lady Macbeth says "he grows worse and worse" because we all know that Macbeth does get worse and worse later on, leading up to his death "I am a man again" He declares that he is a man again because when the ghost was present, he was a mess, he was freaking out, shouting etc. ('horrible shadow, unreal mockery, hence'). However, when it disappears, he returns to his more normal, and relaxed state and is more of a "man". In Shakespearean times, a 'man' was always expected to maintain a calm exterior. Lady Macbeth appears more manly just as she asked for when she summoned the evil spirits in Act 1. Throughout these line Lady Macbeth takes on a more calm exterior, while Macbeth could be seen as more "womanly" because he doesn't keep a calm exterior How can this be related to the human condition? These lines are extremely easily linked to the human condition. Throughout these lines we see guilt overpowering Macbeth therefore he is unable to control his actions, that is very common with people today when they feel guilty.For example, if you were to steal something and you felt guilty about it, you would then probably feel like everyone knew and they were all looking at you, if you see a cop you might get anxious and think that he's after you. Another more relatable scenario to this is a test, or assignment, that you do in school. If you feel really guilt about it you're going to feel that the teacher knows and if the teacher calls you up you may think it's because of the test/assignment, which it may not be, leading you to possibly expose yourself of your actions. Once again the word "strange" is used, just as in Act 1 and the rest of the play, it is used multiple times throughout the play. Everything is "strange" It is ironic in these lines that Lady Macbeth is more calm and collected than Macbeth because later on in the play she commits suicide therefore her condition had to be worse than Macbeths if he was able to manage not doing the same. To conclude through these lines the themes of Guilt, Order and Disorder, Appearance vs. Reality, and Manhood/Manliness were heightened through the use of Punctuation, Imagery, and Contrast between negative and positive diction. Also through certain very important lines in between lines 93-120 of Act 3, Scene 4. Strange Enjambment Lines 95-96
"Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with" a 'run-on' line in which the sentence carries through without a break Manhood/Manliness Macbeth
What man dare, I dare;
Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
The arm’d rhinoceros, or the Hycran tiger,
Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
Shall never tremble: or be alive again,
And dare me to the desert with thy sword; If trembling I inhabit then, protest me.
The baby of a girl. Hence, horrible shadow!
Unreal mockery, hence! These lines are very important to the development of the theme "Manhood/Manliness" because they could be looked at from 2 different perspectives; Macbeths and the people around him. In Macbeths perspective he could see as him standing up to the ghost as "manly", but from the perspective of the rest of the people around him he is seen as less manly because in Shakespearean times, again, it was manly to keep a calm exterior which he was not doing. Lines 99-107 "Quit my sight! let the earth hide thee!" Heightens the theme of guilt because he doesn't want to see him anymore he wants him buried. Also the paranoia led to hallucination and guilt. Also vicious animal imagery heightens the theme of Guilt. Through these lines you can see that Macbeth is explaining his actions towards Banquo vicious therefore using Vicious Animal Imagery. If Macbeth didn't feel as guilty, and as if the deed wasn't brutal and cruel he wouldn't describe it with animals such as these: What is lost and what is won? Banquo is out of the question Won ost Macbeth completely loses his mind in front of his peers and sees the ghost of Banquo. Also more guilt is added onto his conscience We see this guilt previously when Macbeth killed Duncan but at that time he was able to compose himself and hide it better Sight Motif Shakespeare deliberately uses a sight motif because Macbeth is the only one who's seeing this which furthers the theme of Appearance vs. Reality. Line 93: "Avaunt! and quit my sight!" Lines 95-96: "Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with!" Line 114: "When now I think you can behold such sights" Ross: "What sights, my lord?"
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