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Power: The French Regime

Power and Countervailing Power: 1600-1760
by

John Panetta

on 5 April 2016

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Transcript of Power: The French Regime

The French Regime
1600 - 1760

Detail 3
Detail 4
John Panetta
Power & Countervailing Power
Aboriginal Period
The Progressions of Learning do not include any topics for this era
The state holds official power

has the authority to pass laws
has the authority to enforce laws
...but what is a state?
It is whoever has control Mr. Presidents
it can be ordained, given, or taken
Thank you John....can I go back to ruling Canada now?
The important concept to learn this term is how Canada developed from an absolutist state to a democratic state

power in the hands of a few
power is unlimited
dissent (disagreement) is not tolerated

Absolutist
Democratic
power is shared
power is limited
dissent is protected and encouraged

publicly disagreeing with the official opinion
1608
1791
1848
Period of Autocratic Rule
Beginning of Democracy
Responsible Government
Remember that New France was an absolutist government
the king's authority was exercised through the Sovereign Council
no opposition to the King's authority
Charette, J. (2009). A Question of History. Anjou: CEC.

Treaties with Amerindians usually based on commercial motives
Natives demanded military support against their enemies
Economic advantages were the main concern for both parties
No political power
But they were not powerless
The Church had considerable influence in matters of governance
Horguelin, C., Ladouceur, M., Lord, F. and Rose, F. (2011).
Panoramas. Montreal: Graficor.


The Set Up:
Citizen participation is an essential element of democracy
1. Voting
2. The formation of special interest groups
3. Challenging laws in the courts
Legislative Assemblies
What do these documents say about the power relations between the French and Native Nations
Full transcript