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Study Abroad Orientation

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StudyAbroad DePaul

on 17 October 2013

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Transcript of Study Abroad Orientation

Your Objectives
Study Abroad
Orientation

Why did you decide to study abroad?

What do you want to accomplish?

How will you accomplish your goals?

How does this program fit into your future career and personal goals?
Today's Itinerary
1. Preparing

2. While Abroad

3. Coming Back
Registration
You will be registered within four to six weeks. If you have any holds on your student account, please take care of them ASAP so this does not affect your registration.
Preparing
Passports and Visas
Do you have a valid passport? Did you upload a copy to your study abroad web account?

Do you need a visa?

Note: If you are an international student, check in with OISS and the local consulate.
Research Your Destination
Guidebooks
Newspapers
Travel blogs
Talk to your professors
Read Learning Content on Study
Abroad website
Health
Research immunization requirements
Check CDC Website
Plan for prescription needs
Submit Medical Report Form
Ask your doctor questions
Prescription Medication
Bring all prescription medication you will need for the duration of the program in its original container.
Bring a copy of your prescription.
Pack all medication in your carry-on luggage.
CISI Travel Insurance
What is it?
Review policy for details on coverage & limits
- Does not cover pre-existing conditions
Health Insurance Card
Packing
Check weather
Electronics
- What to bring, what to leave?
- Adapters
Luggage limits
- Pack light!
- Fees
- Allow room for your purchases
Financial Planning
Plan for tuition and program fee



Note withdrawal policy
What is NOT included in program fee?
How much spending money do you need?
When Abroad
Travel and Arrival
How will you get to the airport in Chicago?

Where will you go from the airport?

How will you get there?
Homestays
Expectations and contacts
Will have a room with common bathroom & kitchen
Responsible for cleaning bedroom
Families provide breakfast and dinner (almost all days)
Families provide sheets and bath towels and change them at least every two weeks
Students are responsible for their own laundry, which may necessitate finding a public laundromat
Money and Banking
You can use your ATM and credit cards abroad but beware of international banking fees.
Let your bank know you will be traveling overseas.
Check currency conversion rates frequently.
Be street smart - foreigners attract attention.
Leave credit card copies at home.
Safety Abroad
Make copies of your passport, identification, and credit cards. Leave one at home and bring one in a separate piece of luggage.
Carry all valuables and prescription medicine in your carry-on luggage.
Be careful leaving valuables at the hotel when you are not there.
Always tell someone where you are going.
Walk in groups, especially at night.
"Misbehaviors"
....can cause unnecessary accidents.
- Drinking too much
- Using illegal drugs
- Taking risks
- Exercising poor judgment/decision making
Dodging
"Misbehaviors"
Obey the laws of the country
Allow yourself time to adjust
Learn about your host country
Have healthy fun
Avoid political rallies
Stay calm in discussions about politics
Become culturally and socially competent
Make sure to have a support network
Problems with Drugs and Alcohol
Increased risk-taking
Impaired ability to consider consequences
In an unfamiliar environment, intoxicated travelers are more vulnerable
Alcohol is illegal in some countries
Consequences
Possible imprisonment
Negative image for yourself and DePaul
Deportation
Harassment Abroad
You might encounter at least one of the following forms of harassment:

Verbal harassment in public--"catcalls"
Approaches for sexual favors
Staring
Requests for dates
Stalking or following
Organized Begging
Unwanted physical contact
Be Prepared...
Be aware and alert. Know your surroundings. Have a map. Act like you know where you are going even when you don't. Project confidence.
Know how the public phones work. Buy a phone card if necessary or have access to a phone.
Have enough money to get out of a bad area of town.
Observe your local counterparts and try to adopt similar body language and behavior.
Dress appropriately. Don't wear shorts, sleeveless or halters unless the local men/ women do.
Travel with others!
How to Respond if it Happens
Reinforce your statements with strong body language:
- Eye contact, head up, shoulders back, a strong, serious stance
- Don't smile. Timid body language will undermine your message. Repeat yourself if necessary.
Remove yourself from the situation
- Find a safe space
- Store
- Coffee shop
Call attention to a nearby stranger
- Social Responsibility
Do what feels right
- One response might not be the best in all situations
Support is Available
Tell someone you trust about what happened
(advisor, host parent, professor or program coordinator)
Look for peer support
If others have same problem, consider collective solutions
File a formal complaint if it's pervasive sexual harassment
Loud
Hardworking
Obnoxious, Rude
Generous
Informal
Ignorant
Friendly
Promiscuous
Rich & wealthy
Ambitious
Lazy
White
Wasteful
How are Stereotypes Formed
Influence by parents, teachers, and other important figures
Portrayals in the media
Brief interactions with an individual(s) from a certain group often cause us to attach perceived characteristics to all members of that group.
What else?
How Stereotypes and Anti-American Sentiment are Formed?
People in many countries feel left out, they feel that they can never be a part of, or enjoy the benefits of, the globalization movement led by U.S. business expansion.
Many people in other countries believe their local and national cultural values are being threatened by the values promoted by American companies and brands and/or the pervasiveness of our cultural product.
American tourists are not always on their best behavior.
To change a person’s view of your stereotype, be consistently different from it

Stereotypes can be reduced by bringing people together

Beware of how your own stereotype blinds you to the true nature of other individuals

Educate yourself about your host country and its culture (basic factual and historical info, current events, etc)
Changing Stereotypes
In the Event of an Emergency
Inform your faculty director or on-site contact immediately.
DePaul Public Safety Department at +1.773.325.7777 (24 hours).
Capture your Experience
Videos

Journals and blogging

Photography
Coming Back
Continue Study Abroad Back Home
Photo Contest
Re-entry sessions
Spread the word
Fairs and information sessions
GLOBE student group:
international.depaul.edu.AboutUs/GLOBE
Work at the Study Abroad Program Office
http://www2.pacific.edu/sis/culture/
What are you most looking forward to about studying abroad?

What currently worries you most about going overseas?

What (people, places, activities, etc.) do you believe you will miss most when you are abroad?

What (people, places, activities, etc.) do you believe you will miss least when you are abroad?

My greatest single challenge overseas will be ____________.
Group Discussion Questions
Academics
No pass/fail option
Courses affect GPA
Course Registration Form
Course equivalency
Host institution issues transcripts
Study Abroad receives transcripts
Grades are posted to Campus Connect
Expect a delay
Study abroad grades, cont.

You are at a dance club with your friends in downtown Madrid. You're having a great time dancing with your friends. Suddenly, a group of men surrounds you and your friends. You and your friends feel uncomfortable and try to slip out, but they are aggressive and don't let you leave.

What should you do?
Americans tend to be...
Culture
Scenario: Dirty Dancing in Spain
9. She did something with her life.
10. Nice guys finish last. 

Emphasis on accomplishment, achieving things, in addition to being a good person

11. Every cloud has a silver lining.
12. Look on the bright side.
13. Tomorrow is another day.
Optimism

US/American Values
5. She's always beating around the bush.
6. Tell it like it is.
7. Straight talk, straight answer, straight shooter: that's what we need.

US-Americans value directness

8. Stand on your own two feet.

Self-reliance, independence

US/American Values
1. Talk is cheap.
2. Put your money where your mouth is.
3. He's all talk and no action. 

US-Americans value action and doing over talking, especially if it's talking instead of action

4. Where there's a will there's a way. 

Self-determination

US/American Values
“We are operating on a kind of "automatic pilot" and it is not until a problem arises that we think about how we think and act.”

“You may find that everything from proper dining etiquette to what being "on time" means may require relearning, adjusting attitudes, and finding out the local "right way" to do the simplest tasks.” 

Exploration of a new culture  Awareness of our own culture
The drawing below represents a shopkeeper standing behind the counter in his shop. Imagine eight patrons ready to check out.
“Seemingly simple everyday events may be interpreted quite differently when observed by people from different cultures.”

“Avoid making snap judgments about people and situations before you know the background and examine the reasons why they might be behaving and reacting differently than you normally would. [Doing this will help you] interact and communicate more effectively with the local population.”
In the mind of the beholder
1. A person comes to a meeting half an hour after the stated starting time.  
2. Someone kicks a dog.  
3. At the end of a meal, people belch audibly.  
4. Someone makes the OK gesture at you.  
5. A student attends a university lecture wearing flip flops, pajama pants, and a hoodie.  
6. A young man and young woman are kissing each other while seated on a park bench.
7. While taking an exam, a student copies from the paper of another student.
In the mind of the beholder

According to many people from other countries, Americans are…
Asia, Latin America and Africa
“Lining up and not lining up are culturally determined behaviors.”
9. She did something with her life.
10. Nice guys finish last. 

Emphasis on accomplishment, achieving things, in addition to being a good person

11. Every cloud has a silver lining.
12. Look on the bright side.
13. Tomorrow is another day.
Optimism

US/American Values
5. She's always beating around the bush.
6. Tell it like it is.
7. Straight talk, straight answer, straight shooter: that's what we need.

US-Americans value directness

8. Stand on your own two feet.

Self-reliance, independence

US/American Values
1. Talk is cheap.
2. Put your money where your mouth is.
3. He's all talk and no action. 

US-Americans value action and doing over talking, especially if it's talking instead of action

4. Where there's a will there's a way. 

Self-determination

US/American Values
“We are operating on a kind of "automatic pilot" and it is not until a problem arises that we think about how we think and act.”

“You may find that everything from proper dining etiquette to what being "on time" means may require relearning, adjusting attitudes, and finding out the local "right way" to do the simplest tasks.” 

Exploration of a new culture  Awareness of our own culture
The drawing below represents a shopkeeper standing behind the counter in his shop. Imagine eight patrons ready to check out.
“Seemingly simple everyday events may be interpreted quite differently when observed by people from different cultures.”

“Avoid making snap judgments about people and situations before you know the background and examine the reasons why they might be behaving and reacting differently than you normally would. [Doing this will help you] interact and communicate more effectively with the local population.”
In the mind of the beholder
1. A person comes to a meeting half an hour after the stated starting time.  
2. Someone kicks a dog.  
3. At the end of a meal, people belch audibly.  
4. Someone makes the OK gesture at you.  
5. A student attends a university lecture wearing flip flops, pajama pants, and a hoodie.  
6. A young man and young woman are kissing each other while seated on a park bench.
7. While taking an exam, a student copies from the paper of another student.
In the mind of the beholder

According to many people from other countries, Americans are…
Asia, Latin America and Africa
“Lining up and not lining up are culturally determined behaviors.”
Touch
Who, when, how, why…?
Public / private
Greetings / Goodbyes

Personal space

Eye contact

Gestures

Lining up

Eating
Attitude towards…
Age
Change
Taking risks
Formality
Doing (vs. talking or thinking)

Views of…
Human nature
The natural world

Concept of…
Fate and destiny
Suffering and misfortune
Honesty / directness
Equality

Source of…
Self-esteem / self-worth

Degree of…
Realism (Optimism - Cynicism)
Your culture, Their culture
5. She's always beating around the bush.
6. Tell it like it is.
7. Straight talk, straight answer, straight shooter: that's what we need.

US-Americans value directness

8. Stand on your own two feet.

Self-reliance, independence

US/American Values
1. Talk is cheap.
2. Put your money where your mouth is.
3. He's all talk and no action. 

US-Americans value action and doing over talking, especially if it's talking instead of action

4. Where there's a will there's a way. 

Self-determination

US/American Values
“We are operating on a kind of "automatic pilot" and it is not until a problem arises that we think about how we think and act.”

“You may find that everything from proper dining etiquette to what being "on time" means may require relearning, adjusting attitudes, and finding out the local "right way" to do the simplest tasks.” 

Exploration of a new culture  Awareness of our own culture
“Seemingly simple everyday events may be interpreted quite differently when observed by people from different cultures.”

“Avoid making snap judgments about people and situations before you know the background and examine the reasons why they might be behaving and reacting differently than you normally would. [Doing this will help you] interact and communicate more effectively with the local population.”
In the mind of the beholder
1. A person comes to a meeting half an hour after the stated starting time.  
2. Someone kicks a dog.  
3. At the end of a meal, people belch audibly.  
4. Someone makes the OK gesture at you.  
5. A student attends a university lecture wearing flip flops, pajama pants, and a hoodie.  
6. A young man and young woman are kissing each other while seated on a park bench.
7. While taking an exam, a student copies from the paper of another student.
In the mind of the beholder
Prepare to be Understood and to Understand
If you go abroad with absolutely no understanding of how that culture expects to give and receive information, you are going to inevitably experience increased miscommunication and misunderstandings.

Learn the Language (even when its English)

Learn Why Culture Matters
"What’s wrong with them, why can’t they do it the right way?"
"That’s interesting. I wonder why they do that?"

Get the Logistical and Practical Arrangements Settled

Find a Mentor

Stay Curious

Watch for Culture Shock

Keep a journal or notebook

Chill out
“Be flexible, adaptable, and cheerful without abandoning your core values or compromising your sense of self.”
Tips for a successful experience abroad
Common symptoms of culture shock:

According to many people from other countries, Americans are…

Don't give in to the temptation to disparage what you do not like or understand.  

Identify a support network among host nationals, teachers, fellow students, etc. Use it, but don't rely upon it exclusively. 

Understand that any "cultural clash" will likely be temporary.

Give yourself "quiet time," some private space, and be kind to yourself.
Understand symptoms and recognize signs of "culture fatigue" and “culture shock.”

Realize that some degree of discomfort and stress is natural in a cross-cultural experience.

Recognize that your reactions are often emotional and not always (or easily) subject to rational control.

Gather information. Look for the logical reasons behind host culture patterns.

Relax your grip on your normal culture and try to cheerfully adapt to new rules and roles.
Culture Shock
Touch
Who, when, how, why…?
Public / private
Greetings / Goodbyes

Personal space

Eye contact

Gestures

Lining up

Eating
Attitude towards…
Age
Change
Taking risks
Formality
Doing (vs. talking or thinking)

Views of…
Human nature
The natural world

Concept of…
Fate and destiny
Suffering and misfortune
Honesty / directness
Equality

Source of…
Self-esteem / self-worth

Degree of…
Realism (Optimism - Cynicism)
Your culture, Their culture
The drawing below represents a shopkeeper standing behind the counter in his shop. Imagine eight patrons ready to check out.
“Seemingly simple everyday events may be interpreted quite differently when observed by people from different cultures.”

Avoid snap judgments
Examine reasons for behavior
In the mind of the beholder
1. A person comes to a meeting half an hour after the stated starting time.  
2. Someone kicks a dog.  
3. At the end of a meal, people belch audibly.  
4. Someone makes the OK gesture at you.  
5. A student attends a university lecture wearing flip flops, pajama pants, and a hoodie.  
6. A young man and young woman are kissing each other while seated on a park bench.
7. While taking an exam, a student copies from the paper of another student.
In the mind of the beholder
Useful or problematic?
Prepare to be Understood and to Understand
If you go abroad with absolutely no understanding of how that culture expects to give and receive information, you are going to inevitably experience increased miscommunication and misunderstandings.

Learn the Language (even when its English)

Learn Why Culture Matters
"What’s wrong with them, why can’t they do it the right way?"
"That’s interesting. I wonder why they do that?"

Get the Logistical and Practical Arrangements Settled

Find a Mentor

Stay Curious

Watch for Culture Shock

Keep a journal or notebook

Chill out
“Be flexible, adaptable, and cheerful without abandoning your core values or compromising your sense of self.”
Tips for a successful experience abroad

Extreme homesickness
Feelings of helplessness/dependency
Disorientation and isolation
Depression and sadness

Hyper-irritability, may include inappropriate anger and hostility
Excessive critical reactions to host culture/stereotyping

Hypochondria
Extreme concerns over sanitation, safety, and being taken advantage of

Sleep and eating disturbances (too little or too much)
Loss of focus and ability to complete tasks

Excessive drinking
Recreational drug dependency
Common symptoms of culture shock:
Culturally determined behavior

Don't criticize what you do not like or understand.  

Identify a support network

Understand that it's temporary

Give yourself necessary alone time
Recognize...

signs of culture shock

that it's natural

that reactions are emotional, not necessarily rational

Gather information

Relax and try to adapt
Avoiding/Overcoming Culture Shock
Touch
Personal space
Eye contact
Gestures
Lining up
Eating
Dress
Etc.
Attitude towards…
Age
Change
Taking risks
Formality
Doing (vs. talking or thinking)

Views of…
Human nature
The natural world

Concept of…
Fate and destiny
Suffering and misfortune
Honesty / directness
Equality

Source of…
Self-esteem / self-worth

Degree of…
Realism (Optimism - Cynicism)
While attempting to get money out of an ATM in Italy, your card gets sucked into the ATM. You notice the ATM is attached to a bank, but it is after hours. You do not have a credit card to use and this is your only way to pay for things.

What do you do?
Scenario: Card Catastrophe in Italy
Ethnocentrism
Ethnorelativism
The assumption  that cultures can only be understood relative to one another, and that a particular behavior can only be understood within a cultural context. 
Stereotyping
A strong tendency to characterize people of other cultures unfairly, collectively, and often negatively.
Generalizing
Categorizing predominant tendencies in a cultural group; in other words, the tendency of the majority of people to hold certain values and beliefs and engage in certain patterns of behavior.
The idea that your own group or culture is better or more important than others.
Discuss the following with your partner.
Culture Surprise
Culture Stress
Culture Irritation
Culture Fatigue
Educational culture
Class sizes
Professor-student interaction
Course structure
Where’s my syllabus?
Course verification while abroad
Academics Abroad
Scenario: Housing Horror

After a long day of traveling from Chicago to Prague, you finally get to your homestay, thankful for a chance to rest. Two days later, you realize this is not relaxing at all. Your host mom wakes you up early every morning and only allows you to take 5 minute showers. She asks you to inform her if you will be coming home past 11pm and, to top it off, she cooks all her meals with meat and you are a vegetarian.

What do you do?
Auto-pilot
Cultural
Clash
Reflection
Awareness of
NEW Culture
Awareness of
OWN culture
Snap Judgement
Misunderstandings
Culture Shock
http://www2.pacific.edu/sis/culture/
Culture Shock
Research
Values/Beliefs
Behavior
What else?
Identify differences
Re-train
London CEA - Room #103
Sheffield - Room #103
Budapest - #103
Rome Film - Room #202
Rome (Fall) - Room #202
Madrid - Room #207
London Theatre - Free to go!
Melbourne - Room #209
Breakout Rooms
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