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Welcome Back to School 2012-13

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by

Stephen Widrick

on 3 September 2012

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Transcript of Welcome Back to School 2012-13

Together we can. Welcome Back! photo (cc) Malte Sörensen @ flickr Becky Goodell
Heather Von Uderitz
Rebecca Trevisani
Dick Cangemi New Staff Members Miranda Dye
Irene McCarthy
Vicki McPeck
Sheri Perkins
Penny Cambs-Wayne Additional New Staff Bus Drill - Friday, September 7
First Fire Drill - Friday, September 7 @ 9:30 a.m.
8 Firedrills in fall, 4 in Spring
Review Fire Drill Procedures - Yellow Folders
All Exit doors remained closed
Safety information available to substitutes
Confidentiality of student information
Mandated Reporter Responsibilities
School Badges & Car Tags
Universal Precautions - Dot Safety Staff Handbook
Schedules
Procedures
Security
Duties & Supervision
Deadlines Professional Responsibilities "One Foot Rule"
Walk students to specials & lunch
Arrive to duties on time Supervision Attendance - 9:05 a.m.
Substitutes - 6:00-6:15 a.m.
Copy Machine vs. BOCES
Sign out of LGI, Caf. & Rm. 102
Laminator
Color Copying Routines Lunch/Recess Detention
Contact parents the same day
Complete Referral Forms
Student dress
Bullying Discipline Student Illness - Nurse
Cell Phones
Videos
Student Free Time
Faculty Room
Professional Courtesies
Timeliness Reminders What does it look like?
Where are we going?
What can we all do? APPR
We're in this
journey together. An EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATOR
An EFFECTIVE GOAL ACHIEVER
A CRITICAL and CREATIVE THINKER
A COLLABORATIVE CONTRIBUTOR
A QUALITY PRODUCER Commencement Expectations Student Growth So far we have been talking about “similar” students as those with the same prior year assessment score

We will now add two additional features to the conversation:
Two additional years of prior assessment scores
Remember—a student MUST have current year and prior year assessment score to be included
Student-level factors
Economic disadvantage (ED)
Students with disabilities (SWDs)
English language learners (ELLs) Expanding the Definition of “Similar” Students 9 www.engageNY.org A principal’s performance is measured by finding the mean growth percentile for all students in the school. To measure teacher performance, we find the mean growth percentile (MGP) for his or her students. To find an educator’s mean growth percentile, take the average of SGPs in the classroom. In this case:

Step 1: 45+40+70+60+40=255

Step 2. 255/5=51

Ms. Smith’s mean growth percentile (MGP) is 51, meaning on average her students performed better than 51% of similar students. From Student Growth to Teachers and Principals 7 www.engageNY.org SGPs for Ms. Smith’s Students 5 www.engageNY.org Prior and Current Year Performance for Ms. Smith’s Students 3 www.engageNY.org ─ Proficiency Current Year Performance of Same Students 2 www.engageNY.org ─ Proficiency Prior Year Performance for Students in Two Teachers’ Classrooms 1 www.engageNY.org In order for an educator to receive a growth score, he or she must have a minimum sample size of 16 student scores in ELA or mathematics across all grades taught.
Examples:
A teacher has a self-contained classroom with 8 students who take the 4th grade ELA and math assessments; this teacher would then have 16 student scores contributing to his or her growth score.
A teacher has a class with 12 students in varied grades (4th, 5th, 6th) who take the ELA and math assessments for their respective enrolled grade level; this teacher would then have 24 student scores contributing to his or her growth score.

If an educator does not have 16 student scores, he or she will not receive a growth score from the state and will not receive information in the reporting system.
Educators likely to have fewer than 16 scores should use student learning objectives (SLOs). From Student Growth to Teachers and Principals 8 www.engageNY.org A student with an SGP of 50 performed better than 50% of similar students.
A student with an SGP of 80 must be proficient.
A student with an SGP of 20 grew less than a student with an SGP of 60.
The highest SGP that a student can receive is 99.
A student with an SGP of 80 grew twice as much as a student with an SGP of 40. Student Growth Percentiles: True or False? 6 www.engageNY.org If we compare student A’s current score to other students who had the same prior score (450), we can measure her growth relative to other students. We describe her growth as a “student growth percentile” (SGP). Student A’s SGP is the result of a statistical model and in this example is 45, meaning she performed better in the current year than 45% of similar students. Student A’s Current Year Performance Compared to “Similar” Students Low SGPs High SGPs 450 Student A 2012 2011 ELA Scale Score 4 www.engageNY.org Now if student A is economically disadvantaged, we compare student A’s current score to other students who had the same prior score (450) AND who are also economically disadvantaged. In this new comparison group, we see that student A now has an SGP of 48. Expanding the Definition of “Similar” Students to Include Economically Disadvantaged—An Example Low SGPs High SGPs 450 Student A 2012 2011 ELA Scale Score 10 www.engageNY.org Reported to Educators
Used for Evaluation Reported to Educators “Similar” Students: A Summary 11 www.engageNY.org So far we have been talking about “similar” students as those with the same prior year assessment score

We will now add two additional features to the conversation:
Two additional years of prior assessment scores
Remember—a student MUST have current year and prior year assessment score to be included
Student-level factors
Economic disadvantage (ED)
Students with disabilities (SWDs)
English language learners (ELLs) Expanding the Definition of “Similar” Students 9 www.engageNY.org In order for an educator to receive a growth score, he or she must have a minimum sample size of 16 student scores in ELA or mathematics across all grades taught.
Examples:
A teacher has a self-contained classroom with 8 students who take the 4th grade ELA and math assessments; this teacher would then have 16 student scores contributing to his or her growth score.
A teacher has a class with 12 students in varied grades (4th, 5th, 6th) who take the ELA and math assessments for their respective enrolled grade level; this teacher would then have 24 student scores contributing to his or her growth score.

If an educator does not have 16 student scores, he or she will not receive a growth score from the state and will not receive information in the reporting system.
Educators likely to have fewer than 16 scores should use student learning objectives (SLOs). From Student Growth to Teachers and Principals 8 www.engageNY.org A principal’s performance is measured by finding the mean growth percentile for all students in the school. To measure teacher performance, we find the mean growth percentile (MGP) for his or her students. To find an educator’s mean growth percentile, take the average of SGPs in the classroom. In this case:

Step 1: 45+40+70+60+40=255

Step 2. 255/5=51

Ms. Smith’s mean growth percentile (MGP) is 51, meaning on average her students performed better than 51% of similar students. From Student Growth to Teachers and Principals 7 www.engageNY.org SGPs for Ms. Smith’s Students 5 www.engageNY.org Prior and Current Year Performance for Ms. Smith’s Students 3 www.engageNY.org ─ Proficiency Current Year Performance of Same Students 2 www.engageNY.org ─ Proficiency Prior Year Performance for Students in Two Teachers’ Classrooms 1 www.engageNY.org Reported to Educators
Used for Evaluation Reported to Educators “Similar” Students: A Summary 11 www.engageNY.org A student with an SGP of 50 performed better than 50% of similar students.
A student with an SGP of 80 must be proficient.
A student with an SGP of 20 grew less than a student with an SGP of 60.
The highest SGP that a student can receive is 99.
A student with an SGP of 80 grew twice as much as a student with an SGP of 40. Student Growth Percentiles: True or False? 6 www.engageNY.org If we compare student A’s current score to other students who had the same prior score (450), we can measure her growth relative to other students. We describe her growth as a “student growth percentile” (SGP). Student A’s SGP is the result of a statistical model and in this example is 45, meaning she performed better in the current year than 45% of similar students. Student A’s Current Year Performance Compared to “Similar” Students Low SGPs High SGPs 450 Student A 2012 2011 ELA Scale Score 4 www.engageNY.org Now if student A is economically disadvantaged, we compare student A’s current score to other students who had the same prior score (450) AND who are also economically disadvantaged. In this new comparison group, we see that student A now has an SGP of 48. Expanding the Definition of “Similar” Students to Include Economically Disadvantaged—An Example Low SGPs High SGPs 450 Student A 2012 2011 ELA Scale Score 10 www.engageNY.org True False True True False
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