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Forensic Psychology

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by

Silvia Rosado

on 17 October 2014

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Transcript of Forensic Psychology

Voluntary False Confession:
Given voluntarily with minimal police pressure
Protecting family members or loved ones
Self-guilt

Persuaded False Confession:
Doubt of own memory
Convinced

Compliant False Confession:
Confession due to prolonged interrogation
Short-term benefits outweigh the long-term benefits

Forensic psychology is the use of psychology in a legal setting
Forensic Psychologists:
Evaluate defendants mental state
Help professionals prepare for trials
Testify in court regarding their knowledge of psychology
Eyewitness identification: a witness is asked to identify the perpetrator
False confession: someone confesses to a crime they did not commit
Police errors can include: misclassification, coercion, contamination
The details of a crime can describe the perpetrator
PTSD
Focus on weapon instead of perpetrator
Officer can influence
Specifics That Can Interfere With Accurate Identification
Overview
Diving Into Forensic Psychology
What is Forensic Psychology?
A witness is presented with one or more suspects along with “fillers” and asked to identify one as the perpetrator.
What is Eyewitness Identification

The intersection of law and psychological studies.
Ways to Improve Eyewitness Identification
Have one suspect per group of photos
Show the photos one at a time
The Branches of Forensic Psychology
Trial consultant:
Assists legal professionals in preparing a case
Expert witness:
Testifies in court regarding psychology
Evaluator:
Evaluates the mental state of defendants
False Confessions
Why would someone confess when they are innocent?

Frightened young people are easily manipulated
Mental disabilities
Police exploitation
physical threats/ violence
sentence threats
accusations of selective memory
Coercion
Intoxication
Types of False Confessions
How Crime Details Describe the Criminal
Police Errors
Classification:
Having misconceptions about the perpetrator before the interrogation takes place.
Coercion:
Breaking the suspect's resistance to confessing.
Contamination:
Revealing private information about the crime which they then use to describe in detail the way in which the suspect committed the crime.

(Hritz)
The way they murdered the victim
The weapons they used
*Isabella Guzman*
References
Thinking like a
Forensic Psychologist
The Guilty Sketch




Activities:
Thinking like a
Forensic Psychologist cont.
Activities:
Eyewitness Testimony
Using the crime scene scenario draw a sketch of what the criminal might look like.



Cashmore, A. (2010) . The Lucretian Serve: The Biological Basis of Human Behavior and the Criminal Justice System.
PNAs.107. Retrieved from
http://www.pnas.org/content/107/10/4499.full?tab=author-info
Information: Connection between psychology and law

Cohen, A. (2013) . Why Innocent Men Make False Confessions. Time Case Study, Retrieved from http:/
ideas.time.com/2013/02/11/why-innocent-men-make-false-confessions/
Information: Why innocent men make false confessions.
Use: Informs us on the different causes why an innocent might confess to a crime they didn't commit.

False Confessions. (n.d.). False Confessions. Retrieved September 9, 2014, from http://courses2.cit.cornell.edu/sociallaw/stu

Hernandez, L. (2014) . Judge accepts Isabella Guzman's insanity plea; accused of stabbing mother 151 times. ABC Denver
Channel, Retrieved from http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/isabella-guzman-pleads-not-guilty-by-reason-of-insanity-in-stabbing-death-of-her-mom-yun-
Information: Isabella was mentally ill.
Use:Shows us how a person's mental state is shown through the way they commit the crime

Hrits, A. Blau, M. Tomezsko, S. (N/A) . False Confessions. Cornell University Law School. Social Science and Law Student
Projects, Retrieved from http://courses2.cit.cornell.edu/sociallaw/student_projects/FalseConfessions.html
Information: False Confessions

Jay, J. (N/A) . Department of Psychology. The City University of New York, Retrieved from http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/departments/
psychology/about.php
Information: Definition of Forensic Psychology
Use: Gives us a primary knowledge of forensic psychology

Rissman, J. etc. (2010) . Detecting Individual Memories Through the Neural Decoding of Memory States and Past Experience.
PNAS. Retrieved from http://www.pnas.org/content/107/21/9849.full.pdf+html
Information: Eyewitness Identification
Use: This informs us on how a persons brain works on remembering things like when they are witnesses to a crime


Why Innocent Men Make False Confessions | TIME.com. (n.d.). Ideas Why Innocent Men Make False Confessions Comments. Retrieved September 9, 2014, from http://ideas.time.com/2013/02/11/why-innocent-men-make-false-confessions/
Rabasca, L. (2000) . A Court that Sentences Psychological Care Rather Than Jail. American Psychological Association. 31, 7. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/monitor/julaug00/court.aspx
Information: Criminals that are not mentally stable are not sent to jail or prison.
Use: We get a glimpse at how psychologists analyze people and their actions to see if they're mentally stable
.

Zapf, P. (2011) . What are the Roles and Responsibilities of a Forensic Psychologist?. ForensicPsychology.org, Retrieved from
http://www.clinicalforensicpsychology.org/what-are-the-roles-and-responsibilities-of-a-forensic-psychologist/
Information: What forensic psychologists truly do.
Use: Informs us what specific work forensic psychologists, how they help crimes.

Reference:Information: eyewitness identification
Use: informs us on how common it is for witnesses to misidentify somebody which ends up in a wrongful conviction

(2011) . Eyewitness Identification. National Institute of Justice. Retrieved from http://www.nij.gov/topics/law-enforcement/investigations/eyewitness-identification/pages/welcome.aspx
Information: Eyewitness identification
Hrits, A. Blau, M. Tomezsko, S. (N/A) . False Confessions. Cornell University Law School. Social Science and Law Student Projects, Retrieved from http://courses2.cit.cornell.edu/sociallaw/student_projects/FalseConfessions.html
Information: False Confessions
Rabasca, L. (2000) . A Court that Sentences Psychological Care Rather Than Jail. American Psychological Association. 31, 7. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/monitor/julaug00/court.aspx
Information: Criminals that are not mentally stable are not sent to jail or prison.
Use: We get a glimpse at how psychologists analyze people and their actions to see if they're mentally stable.

Rissman, J. etc. (2010) . Detecting Individual Memories Through the Neural Decoding of Memory States and Past Experience. PNAS. Retrieved from http://www.pnas.org/content/107/21/9849.full.pdf+html
Information: Eyewitness Identification
Use: This informs us on how a persons brain works on remembering things like when they are witnesses to a crime

Cashmore, A. (2010) . The Lucretian Serve: The Biological Basis of Human Behavior and the Criminal Justice System. PNAs. 107. Retrieved from
http://www.pnas.org/content/107/10/4499.full?tab=author-info
INformation: Connection between psychology and law
Use: Informs us on

Reference:Information: eyewitness identification
Use: informs us on how common it is for witnesses to misidentify somebody which ends up in a wrongful conviction

(2011) . Eyewitness Identification. National Institute of Justice. Retrieved from http://www.nij.gov/topics/law-enforcement/investigations/eyewitness-identification/pages/welcome.aspx
Information: Eyewitness identification
You were a first hand witness of a crime. Without talking to anyone else describe what you saw happen.
(Zapf 2011)
(National Institute of Justice
2011)
(California Innocence Project 2011)
(California Innocence Project 2011)
(Cohen 2013)
(Hirtz)
Full transcript