Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Sexting: 15 Seconds of Fame for a Lifetime of Shame!

No description
by

Kenneth Wilks

on 12 September 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Sexting: 15 Seconds of Fame for a Lifetime of Shame!

http://au.news.yahoo.com/today-tonight/video/watch/30339404/the-dangers-of-sexting/ SAFE SEXTING...THERE IS NO SUCH THING! Tamara Baghous
Courtney Holmes
Emma Jackson
Ailie Horswell
Kenneth Wilks
Andrew Owens S e x t I n g
Children & the law Overview Definition of ‘sexting’
Relevance of children and young people’s representation in the media
Megan’s story
Social Issues
Legal Implications
Suggestions… Overview Definition of ‘sexting’
Relevance of children and young people’s representation in the media
Megan’s story
Social Issues
Legal Implications
Suggestions… According to the National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children in the USA (2009), the term ‘sexting’ refers to the practice of ‘youth writing sexually explicit messages, taking sexually explicit photos of themselves or others in their peer group, and transmitting those photos and/or messages to their peers’

For the purpose of this presentation we will be focusing on sexually explicit images that involving young people. Sexting: 15 minutes of Fame for
a Lifetime of Shame ‘sexting’ Sexting and the Media Sexting craze draws in kids at age 10
Katherine Danks
June 25 2012 12:00AM
The Daily Telegraph

BoysTown, which runs the Kids Helpline counselling service, said sexting-related awareness and education campaigns should target children and young people aged 10-18.
Almost 500 young people across Australia contacted the service with concerns about sexting - sending sexually explicit texts or photos to mobile phones - between January and March. More than 75 per cent were female.
Counselling sessions tended to be with people aged under 19 and one in three was aged 10 to 14 years.
"When sexting behaviour gets out of hand, or more specifically, sext images get into undesirable hands, the impacts of sexting can be multi-faceted and extreme," BoysTown said in a submission to the Victorian Law Reform Committee's inquiry into sexting.

"Young people can find themselves the victims of humiliation, bullying, harassment, threat, punishment (from school and/or parents) and criminalisation."

The Royal Children's Hospital Gatehouse Centre for assessment and treatment of child abuse said it had seen a marked increase in the age range of participants, with some as young as 10 years.
Sexting has legal consequences if the person involved is under 18 because it can be considered child porn.
The inquiry heard from the mother of a teenager whose son was placed on the child sex offenders register after sharing images from a consensual video of he and his girlfriend having sex when they were 17.
He was fined $1000 and no conviction recorded, but was placed on the child sex offenders register for 15 years.

A Salvation Army submission used the example of a teenage girl in America who committed suicide after photos she sent to her boyfriend were sent to hundreds of people.
Cyber-safety campaigner Nina Funnell said young people need to be taught about the ethical use of technology, including how to preserve their own and other people's reputations. Broken hill teenagers concerned about 'sexting' laws
Natalie Whiting
Posted Mon Aug 13, 2012 9:57am AEST
ABC News

Broken Hill students have spoken out against laws that classify consensual texting as child pornography.

A solicitor from Legal Aid met with students to discuss "sexting" - sending sexually explicit text messages - as part of a law reform project.
Julianne Elliott, who met with the students, said many weren't aware sexting could be included under child pornography offences.

"There was a strong feeling that they were two very different things," she said.

"People sexting as teenagers, especially where it's a consensual activity, that's very different in their minds from what we would consider to be adult predatory sex offenders, in a more traditional understanding of what child pornography might mean."

The visit was part of a project called 'New voices, new laws' which is gathering the opinions of teenagers from across the state on the issue.

Ms Elliott said the opinions of the teenagers will form the basis of the project.

"In terms of law reform or writing to whoever we might be writing to, to at least let the people who make policy and law change decisions what young people actually think of the situation," she said.

"Those voices are the voices of young people, and we wanted to include that in any work around law reform on this issue." New laws needed for teen sexting: inquiry
Melissa Jenkins
Tue Aug 7 2012 18:23 AEST
9News

New laws should be introduced in Victoria to deal with sexting, with almost one fifth of children aged 10 to 15 having either sent or received a sext, an inquiry has been told.


Youth 'sexting' and the law

ABC Radio: Broadcast: Tuesday 3 April 2012 5:40PM Social issues Global & National DATA In 2010, close to 100 teenagers from across the country were charged and many more cautioned, in relation to child pornography offences related to sexting where the person infringed was under the age of 16.

A reader poll conducted by Girlfriend magazine found that four in ten respondents had previously been asked to forward a nude photo of themselves, and half that number complied.

Girls are more likely to sext, most of the girls cited the fear of intimidation or of not wanting to disappoint a boyfriend or male admirer. The use of mobile technologies makes it easier to create, exchange and display images.

Technology amplifies the problem by facilitating the objectification of girls

Popular social media sites such Facebook have increasingly become a telecommunications tool of choice that young people use to distribute explicit images of themselves or others

The digital domain of today is forever, and YouTube videos, nude snapshots, and strings of sexually explicit text travel around cyberspace without a burn-out date. Technology amplifies the problem CYBERBULLYING The issues of cyber bullying and ‘sexting’, are emerging as the number one issue confronting the safety and wellbeing of young people.

Sexting is considered a form of cyberbullying when nude images are uploaded and shared on the internet. This is especially the case where images are shared past the intended audience or when accompanied by nasty comments.

Cyberbullying is extremely detrimental to a young
person’s wellbeing and can lead to serious mental
health problems. In extreme cases it can lead to
suicide. Responsibility of schools The parties involved in cyberbullying, harassment and sexting are often from within the same school or neighbouring schools

When bullying occurs online, regardless of where it actually took place, and the fallout is obvious to school staff, it does become a school issue.

Schools, teachers and school leaders have a legal responsibility to respond to bullying behaviour, including when it occurs online or through texts. Confidentiality & Reporting Confidentiality issues with reports of sexing and cyber bullying can be difficult and ethically challenging for therapists and youth workers.

Youth workers are mandated to report child abuse, and any cyber bullying that takes the form of sexually explicit images of a minor must be reported to local law enforcement.

As the prevalence of “sexting” increases, many therapists and/ or youth workers will be faced with increasing instances of the need to report. Confidentiality& Reporting Confidentiality issues with reports of sexing and cyber bullying can be difficult and ethically challenging for therapists and youth workers.

Youth workers are mandated to report child abuse, and any cyber bullying that takes the form of sexually explicit images of a minor must be reported to local law enforcement.

As the prevalence of “sexting” increases, many therapists and/ or youth workers will be faced with increasing instances of the need to report. Megan’s Story, as a high-profile public campaign against sexting, provides a useful starting point for analysing the current understandings of sexting practices by young people.

It was produced by ThinkUKnowAustralia, a partnership organisation that includes the Australian Federal Police (AFP), the Virtual Global Taskforce and Microsoft Australia. Megan's story Megan’s story cont.

It aims to warn young people against the dangers of mobile ‘sexting’.

The narrative of ‘Megan’s Story’ illustrates that the consequences of sexting are only serious for the subject of the image resulting in public humiliation and shame.

Some academics and high-profile educators have branded this well-meaning initiative ‘dull and unrealistic’.
"Once these images are out there, you have no control as to who will access them or when," he said.
"These images may be viewed by thousands of people across various social media networks where paedophiles can download them and add them to their collection." "We are certainly seeing more occurrences of 'sexting' - however, we know that teenage victims are often reluctant to report this crime”. “75% of teenagers knew about the risk involved with sexting but many went ahead and did it anyway” “Teenagers are being lured into a sexting subculture” "Nude and sexual images, videos and text messages of people under the age of 18 are considered child pornography and it may be a criminal offence." "If images are posted online it can be almost impossible to remove them or to control access to them” "When sexting behaviour gets out of hand, or more specifically, 'sext' images get into undesirable hands, the impacts of sexting can be multi-faceted and extreme" “Sharing sexually suggestive images or text messages may be seen as innocent flirting or amusement, but sexting can have serious personal, social and legal consequence." “Now kids are sexting in primary school” Sexting & The Law Sexting & The Law Cont. NSW Legislation Director of Public Prosecutions v Eades [2009] NSWSC 1352 Cth Legislation Sex Offenders Register As is common with social problems that stem from rapidly developing technology, the law in Australia has failed to keep up.

As a result the issue of sexting is covered by an overlapping matrix of existing laws that may touch on sexting, but which do not adequately address the problem. Most of the debate, and the area which receives the most attention in the media, is the criminal law and more specifically, child pornography offences. S91H(2) of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW) holds that a person who produces, disseminates or possesses child abuse material is guilty of an offence. The maximum penalty under this section is 10 years imprisonment.

Under s61N of the same act it is an offence to commit an act of indecency with or towards a person under the age of 16 years, or to incite a person under that age to an act of indecency with or towards that or another person. The maximum penalty under this section is 2 years imprisonment. In 2009, the boyfriend of a 13-year old schoolgirl became the first person in Australia to be prosecuted in relation to sexting. Mr Eades had asked his 13 year old girlfriend to send him a ‘hot steamy picture’ after he sent this image of himself to his girlfriend. The girlfriend sent Mr. Eades a full frontal naked photo of herself via picture message. Her dad checked her mobile, found the text and went to police. At a federal level this issue is covered by the telecommunication provisions under the Criminal Code Act. The definition in Section 473.1 of the act is very similar to the definition under the Crimes Act 1900. The most significant concern for those children engaged in sexting is that if convicted of the above offences under a young person may be placed on the sex offenders register.

The most concerning part of this aside from the significant burden is the stigma attached to such a label and the impact it will have on their future employment and their ability to become a functioning member of society. Issues With Current Law One-size-fits-all approach that lumps children sexting other children in the same category as paedophiles grooming children.

placing sexting teenagers in the same group as paedophiles and other more serious sex offenders has the affect of diluting the sex offender registry

contrary to the principle of doli incapax THERE IS NO SUCH THING! The symptom not the problem Young Persons and Sexting:
You take a picture of yourself either naked or in your underwear and send it to your partner.

Your phone beeps. You pick it up. You’ve just been sent images of topless girls.

You and your boyfriend or girlfriend film yourselves having sex. After breaking up you discover they have sent still pictures of the film to their friends. Common scenarios Do teenage “sexting” laws in Australia adequately respect the rights of children ? The real issue Each state requires that offenders are placed on a register for a minimum period of time

May affect their freedom of movement and whether they can have future contact with children.

The Sex Offenders Registration Act 2004 (Vic) places offenders on the Register for a non-reviewable period of eight years.

A similar, though life-long, non-reviewable reporting requirement has been found to be contrary to the European Human Rights Convention. Sex Offenders Register Australia is a signatory of CROC
Commitment to ensure certain protection and rights to all children below the age of 18 including:
that in all actions taken by a state the best interests of the child must be taken into consideration;
the right to freedom of expression subject to appropriate restrictions including the need to respect the reputation of others and for the protection of public health or morals; and
protection of the child from all forms of sexual exploitation and sexual abuse. Convention of the Rights of the Child Do our laws take into account the best interests of
the child? The Question? You take a picture of yourself either naked or in your underwear and send it to your partner.

Your phone beeps. You pick it up. You’ve just been sent images of topless girls.

You and your boyfriend or girlfriend film yourselves having sex. After breaking up you discover they have sent still pictures of the film to their friends. Common scenarios As a non-threatening way to explore their sexuality

Avoids the risk of pregnancy or a sexually transmitted disease

Control over production of the images Young persons’ perceptions
of “sexting” Current laws in some Australian states do not consider the best interests of the child, and should be amended to give judges discretion not to put young people on the Sex Offenders Register. Law Reform
Full transcript