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BATH SALTS

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cory lemon

on 10 April 2014

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Transcript of BATH SALTS

BATH SALTS
a presentation by Cory Lemon
WHAT DO BATH SALTS LOOK LIKE?
WHAT ARE BATH SALTS?
Bath salts are stimulants composed of the chemicals methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), mephedrone and methylone.
These chemicals are all cathinones, synthetic versions of the active ingredient in khat.
WHAT ELSE IS IT CALLED?
several brand names include:
Bliss
Blue Silk
Cloud Nine
Drone
Energy-1
Ivory Wave
Lunar Wave
Meow Meow
Ocean Burst
Pure Ivory
Purple Wave
Red Dove
Snow Leopard
Stardust
Vanilla Sky
White Dove
White Knight
White Lightning
MDPV is an off-white or fine-white powder.
Bath salts can be snorted, wrapped in cigarette paper and swallowed, or dissolved in liquid and injected.
Bath Salt products are sold in powder, capsule, or tablet form in small plastic or foil packages of 200 and 500 milligrams under various brand names.
SHORT TERM EFFECTS
rapid heartbeat
extreme paranoia
psychosis
high blood pressure
nausea and vomiting
extreme agitation
blurry vision
profuse sweating
irritation/bleeding of the nose mouth or throat
muscle twitching/convulsions
*Note: number of and extremity of effects depends on the dosage.
LONG TERM EFFECTS
The long term effects of bath salts are mostly unknown because the drug is so new.
However, some long term effects may include:
Suicide
Erratic behavior
Hallucinations
Psychosis
Insomnia
Kidney failure
Tolerance
WHAT IS THE HISTORY OF BATH SALTS?
In the 1970s, medical chemist Richard A. Glennon began researching how one could turn a stimulant into a hallucinogen.
The cathinone he synthesized:
was identical to the active ingredient in khat
had been showing up in the Soviet Union for years, under the street name "Jeff"
Bath salts first started making an appearance in the United States in 2010, when 304 calls to Poison Control centers were made reporting the use of bath salts. In 2011, this number was 6, 138.
“Imagine the space between the nerve cells as a kitchen sink and the water as dopamine. In the brain's natural state, the faucet, or nerve cell endings, are always leaking some dopamine, and the drain is always slightly open, vacuuming some of the chemical back into the cell. Methamphetamine turns the faucet on high. Cocaine closes the drain. Bath salts, researchers discovered, do both at the same time. With the faucet on and the drain closed, the water overflows. In other words, the drug was flooding the brain.”
TRUE OR FALSE?
Bath salts can be easily detected through means of detection dogs or urinalysis.
False.
ARE BATH SALTS LEGAL?
Substances containing MDPV are legally sold on the Internet and in convenience stores and head shops.
October 21, 2011: DEA used its emergency powers to classify three ingredients of bath salts as Schedule I drugs under the Controlled Substances Act.
Schedule I: No “currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States,” highly addictive
July 9, 2012: President Obama signed the Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act, which bans MDPV, mephedrone and 29 other ingredients of bath salts
July 26, 2012: the Drug Enforcement Administration announced that it had seized more than five million packets of synthetic drugs and arrested 90 people in a nationwide crackdown called Operation Log Jam
60% of reported cases have been 25 or younger
DRUG ABUSE HOTLINE FOR BATH SALTS
(855) 954-2724
NEW YORK—To report synthetic drug abuse, sale, manufacturing, distribution
or possession:
1-888-99-SALTS (1-888-997-2587)
SOURCES
MULTIPLE CHOICE
Bath salts are classified as a(n) _______
(a) inhalant
(b) stimulant
(c) depressant
(d) hallucinogen
On May 26, Miami police shot and killed a homeless man who was allegedly feasting on the face of another homeless man in a daylight attack on a busy highway.
Derived from Catha Edulis Plant
Khat: (aka Arabian Tea, Qat, Gat, Jaad, Jimma
Cathinone Origin
Chewed since the 14th century throughout the Middle East and Africa
An amphetamine-like central nervous system stimulant.
Works Cited
Walton, Alice G.
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