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On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

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by

Mikee Pallera

on 6 November 2013

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Transcript of On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer
Reading/Structure
Paraphrase
Figurative Language
1) Personification: "Planet swims"/line:10
John Keats (1795-1821)
Theme
Discovering a new wonder comes along with a new experience.
Much have I traveled in the realms of gold,
And many goodly states and kingdoms seen;
Round many western islands have I been
Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold.
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told
That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne;
Yet did I never breathe its pure serene
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold:
Then felt I like some watcher of the skies
When a new planet swims into his ken;
Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes
He stared at the Pacific--and all his men
Looked at each other with a wild surmise--
Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
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Sonnet type: Italian
Much have I traveled in the realms of gold,
And many goodly states and kingdoms seen;
Round many western islands have I been Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold.
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told
That deep-browed Homer ruled his demesne;
Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold:
When a new planet swims into his ken;
Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific-- and all his men Looked at each other with a wild surmise-- Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
"Apollo = Greek God"
"deep-browed" = intellect/wisdom
describes Homer
knowledge
"his" = Homer
Describes Keat's excitement of traveling to Homer's land
possession of own land
poet
sworn loyalty to the lord
"realms of gold" being the different literature works Keats has read
wide expanse to the pure serene
evidence
on Connecticut's "Gold Coast"
Cortez's "eagle eyes"
"...wild surmise--Silent..."
-looks silent, but inside contains excitement- *in awe
2) Alliteration: "surmise--Silent"/line:13-14
3) Metaphor: "eagle eyes"/line:11
octave
sestet
Having a "wild" surmise then adding a pause continuing to transition into the word "silent" creates dynamics in the lyrical structure.
Adds imagery by moving from "realms of gold" from the beginning of the sonnet, into the "planet".
The positive comparison creates visuals of the speaker staring onto the Pacific.
By: Mikee Pallera (2B)
Preface
John Keats:
-Father died, then lived with his mother
-After attending school, lived with his grandparents since his mother passed
-Under authority of Keat's grandparents, John was in apprenticeship to become a surgeon
-Became a hospital student and had a friend named Cowden Clarke
-Under influence of Clarke, exchanged his medical ambitions for a literary life
Keat's experience when
he read Chapman's
Homer
... in the wonderful world of poetry
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey
Setting up imagery from going to the western islands to the 'eastern islands'
Chapman: George Chapman=English dramatist during the Renaissance period
Cortez: Spanish Conquistador
...The world of poetry
Then felt I like some watcher of the skies
Full transcript