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BOOKS THAT READ BY JOSE P. RIZAL

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rafadz onofre

on 21 March 2014

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Transcript of BOOKS THAT READ BY JOSE P. RIZAL

BOOKS THAT READ BY
DR. JOSE P. RIZAL

What is interesting are the “pragmatic” books, which show the breadth of the hero’s interests and an inkling into his plan to create a Philippine colony in North Borneo later in life: guidebooks to Paris, Germany, the Rhine, Central Italy, Switzerland; Baille’s Las Maravillas de la Electricidad; Baire’s six-volume Studies of Birds; Buenet’s Drawings and Ornaments of Architecture; Balter’s The Art of Grafting and Budding; Duyckinck’s Lives and Pictures of the Presidents of the United States; Money’s Java: or How to Manage a Colony; Levy’s Treatise on Public and Private Hygiene; Nasau Lees’ Tea Cultivation, Cotton and other Agricultural Experiments in India.


Esteban de Ocampo, in his monograph Rizal as Bibliophile, copied the bibliographic cards of Rizal in Fort Santiago and those cards kept by Rizal’s relatives. He listed 252 cards, not knowing that the Lopez Museum had 99 more cards. Rizal owned a valuable collection of over 2,000 books, which he left with Jose Ma. Basa in Hong Kong. Josephine Bracken, realizing the monetary value of Rizal’s library, tried to claim it as Rizal’s “widow,” but because she was unable to present concrete proof of her marriage to Rizal, she dropped the claim.
Rizal grew up in a home with a large library—a rarity in the nineteenth century Philippines. Thus, he developed a liking for books and learning. In Europe, though he was on a shoestring budget, with his allowance sometimes arriving late, he would still scrimp and save to buy books.
Rizal read books in the Philippines
Azcarraga y Pamero’s La Libertad de comercio en las Isalas Filipinas; Blumentritt’s Breve diccionario etnografico de Filipinas:Meyer’s Album von Philippinen Typen; and Montero y Vidal’s El Archipelago Filipino y las Islas Marianas, Carolinas y Palaos, among many others.
Rizal also read Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, Charle’s Dicken’s David Copperfield,and Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales, five of which he even translated into Tagalog for his nephew and nieces. He read The Barber of Seville and the Marriage of Figaro by Beaumarchais, so it is highly probable that after reading these, he went to Mozart’s operas (0r vice versa).
Rizal read a lot of French literature
Honore de Balzac, Alexander Dumas pére Three Musketeers and Count of Monte Cristo; the complete works of Pierre Jean de Beranger, Moliere [Jean Baptiste Poquelin], Charles de Secondat Montesquieu andfrom Sainte Helene.
Most of his books were in Spanish translation, although he did read English, French, and German too.Honore de Balzac, Alexander Dumas pére Three Musketeers and Count of Monte Cristo; the complete works of Pierre Jean de Beranger, Moliere [Jean Baptiste Poquelin], Charles de Secondat Montesquieu and from Sainte Helene. Most of his books were in Spanish translation, although he did read English, French, and German too.
Some pictures of the books that had been read by Dr. Jose P. Rizal
Alexandre Dumas (French: [a.lɛk.sɑ̃dʁ dy.ma], born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie, [dy.ma da.vi də la pa.jə.tʁi]; 24 July 1802 – 5 December 1870),[1] also known as Alexandre Dumas, père, was a French writer. His works have been translated into nearly 100 languages, and he is one of the most widely read French authors.
Mikhaíl Afanasyevich Bulgakov was a Russian writer and playwright active in the first half of the 20th century. He is best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which has been called one of the masterpieces of the 20th century.
The End
Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published on 25 April 1719. This first edition credited the work's fictional protagonist Robinson Crusoe as its author, leading many readers to believe he was a real person and the book a travelogue of true incidents.
David Copperfield is the common name of the eighth novel by Charles Dickens, first published as a novel in 1850. Its full title is The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account).[1] Like most of his works, it originally appeared in serial form during the two preceding years. Many elements of the novel follow events in Dickens' own life, and it is probably the most autobiographical of his novels.[
The Three Musketeers (French: Les Trois Mousquetaires is a novel by Alexandre Dumas, first serialized in March–July 1844. Set in the 17th century, it recounts the adventures of a young man named d'Artagnan after he leaves home to travel to Paris, to join the Musketeers of the Guard.
Hans Christian Andersen was a Danish author and poet. Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues, novels, and poems, Andersen is best remembered for his fairy tales.
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