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Making Inferences

Using picture books to make inferences.
by

Heidi Suttle

on 20 March 2012

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Transcript of Making Inferences

Before We Make Inferences...
In order to making an inference

you must
“read between the lines”
or
“fill in the gaps”
.

Inferring in reading – and in life itself – is figuring out the answers using two tools:
your own
background information

whatever
new information
you have access to
Writer's Notebook
Making Inferences
Find the ERROR
Find the ERROR
Flashbacks: Fragments
Ask ourselves:
What are some qualities of a scary movie? What happens at the beginning? In the middle? At the end? Most importantly:
how do you know?
Don't forget: "So What" projects are due Tuesday!
For Example:
If my little sister’s lips are quivering, it signals me to give her a big hug.


What background information do you have about little kids?


What new information were you given in this sentence?
A. My favorite novel, surprisingly by a British author, won out over such books as Moby Dick, The House of the Seven Gables, and The Trumpet of the Swan, all of which were written by Americans.

B. My favorite novel, winning out over such books as Moby Dick, The House of the Seven Gables, and The Trumpet of the Swan, surprisingly by a British author, not an American one.

C. My favorite novel, winning out over such books as Moby Dick, The House of the Seven Gables, and The Trumpet of the Swan, was surprisingly by a British author, not by an American one.
A. Not only do books' bindings sometimes break, but often the pages then begin falling out and getting lost. 

B. Not only do books' bindings sometimes break, but pages fall out and get lost. 

C. Books' bindings sometimes breaking, and pages fall out and get lost. 
What do I already know about this topic?
Activating Prior Knowledge:
Children's Books
What do we know about children's books?
Qualities of
Children's Books
lessons learned
repetition of activities
pictures
happy ending
funny
sets of 3
formulaic
Making Inferences
What background information do we have about relatives? (Think about your own relatives - the good and the bad.)
Quote or Illustration:
"their grapes were nearly purple enough to pick, but not quite."
Inference:
The grapes are important. They will be significant.
Quote or Illustration:
the car was traveling over the last four pages
Inference:
The relatives live very far away. This family probably doesn't see each other very often. The relatives will probably stay a long time with their family.
Quote or Illustration:
There are lots of pictures of hugging family members and smiling faces.
Inference:
This family loves each other! They are happy to see each other.
Quote or Illustration:
There are too many people in this house! They don't have enough beds.
Inference:
The family may start to get irritated with each other because there is no room.
Quote or Illustration:
"we crawled back into our beds that felt too big and too quiet."
Inference:
The family is sad that the relatives are gone. They miss them.
Quote or Illustration:
"dark purple grapes"
Inference:
The grapes went from light purple to dark purple, so I know that lots of time has passed from when the relatives first left.
Quote or Illustration:
"dreamed about next summer"
Inference:
The relatives had a good time visiting their family and can't wait to go back!
Look at the last column on your handout.

Which of these inferences were proven? Disproven?
An inference is an assumption you make based on information in the text, even though the wording of the text doesn’t specifically say that the inferred conclusion is correct.
For instance, you may infer from the dialogue that a character is evil, heroic, noble, or dishonest.
You may also infer that the author thinks highly of a person he or she is describing, or you may you infer that the author is highly critical of the subject of the text.
Making Inferences
If my boss looks grumpy, it may not be the best day to discuss a new project I have in mind.

What background information do you have about bosses?


What new information were you given in this sentence?
For Example:
Complete the Study Island assignment.
Assignment
Be sure to write down your background information and new information from the article.
With your table groups, choose a children's book.

Together, make a list of what you already know about this topic.

Then, using pictures and quotes, make
inferences.
You try...
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